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[civilwarwest] KY: Some Brother Against Brother Pre- and Early War History

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  • pickettm@computronicsusa.com
    According to what I understand, Ky s neutrality was precarious from the start. The state had, for a full generation, been striving for a compromise. As the
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 9, 1999
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      According to what I understand, Ky's neutrality was precarious from the
      start. The state had, for a full generation, been striving for a
      compromise. As the war approached, this mainly frontier state was very
      nationalistic, but economically pro-Southern. PapaP's family would be
      an example of this. They, like many settlers in south central KY, had
      migrated from VA with a small number of slaves to work the land and a
      family background that would support CSA philosophies. KY's governor,
      the Honorable B. Magoffin, was pro-Southern being frank and open in his
      desire for secession; the legislature was mostly pro-Northern and
      cautious. On May 6, 1861, an extra session of the legislature adopted
      an "armed neutrality" stance and amended the militia law of KY to
      compel the "State Guard" to take an oath of allegiance not only to KY,
      but also to the U.S. This "State Guard" was inclined toward the CSA
      however, so being forced to take the oath did not equate to support.
      It did, however, stop the use of this armed force in pushing the state
      toward the CSA. A new body which soon spread throughout the state was
      formed in Louisville by their city council called the "Home Guard". It
      was very pro-Union, and was used to check the "State Guard". The "Home
      Guard" had both more men and more equipment. It was when this happened
      men like Simon Buckner resigned their commissions as officers of the
      "State Guard" and officially joined the CSA. By September, 1861, 3 CSA
      camps were located just over the southern border of the state.
      Similarly, the Union had established camps on the nothern state border.
      Between these boundaries, the state's citizens must have been reeling.
      It was when Polk pleaded military necessity to occupy Columbus on
      Sept. 5 that Grant occupied Paducah on Sept. 7. Once these troops
      were within the boundaries of the state, KY was forced to abandon her
      neutrality and make a stance one way or the other in alliance. The
      only other option would have been to maintain neutrality by resisting
      both powers which by that time seems all but impossible IMHO. The KY
      State Legislature called on the Federal government to assist in
      expelling Polk, thereby committing KY to the Union. By Nov. 1, 1/3 of
      the state was in possession of the Confederacy. A provisional
      government was established in Russelville which refused to recognize
      the earlier government act which had committed KY to the USA by stating
      that it was an unfair political move and not indicative of the majority
      of the inhabitants true sentiments. CSA KY soldiers adopted an
      ordinance of secession at this convention. Buell was given command of
      the Dept. of the Ohio, headquarted in Louisville, and began organizing
      and equiping the scattered Union forces in the state for an anticipated
      drive toward the Confederates. Southern soldiers, too, began
      organizing in Bowling Green and strengthed their lines from Columbus
      through Mundordville to the Cumberland Gap. The stage was set and it
      was only a matter of time before act one began.

      As far as sympathies one way or the other, "Historical Times Ad
      Nauseum" states 76,000 Kentuckians served with Union forces and about
      25,000 with the CSA. If one can use these figures as any sort of a
      basis, it would seem the state was indeed mostly pro-Union. Whatever
      their allegiance, 30,000 of these men died (10,000 of wounds and 20,000
      of disease and exposure) fighting for their beiefs.

      Now, you all know I didn't get this off the top of my head! I just was
      doing some reading and thought I'd share what I've learned. (-:%

      MAP
    • pickettm@computronicsusa.com
      According to what I understand, Ky s neutrality was precarious from the start. The state had, for a full generation, been striving for a compromise. As the
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 9, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        According to what I understand, Ky's neutrality was precarious from the
        start. The state had, for a full generation, been striving for a
        compromise. As the war approached, this mainly frontier state was very
        nationalistic, but economically pro-Southern. PapaP's family would be
        an example of this. They, like many settlers in south central KY, had
        migrated from VA with a small number of slaves to work the land and a
        family background that would support CSA philosophies. KY's governor,
        the Honorable B. Magoffin, was pro-Southern being frank and open in his
        desire for secession; the legislature was mostly pro-Northern and
        cautious. On May 6, 1861, an extra session of the legislature adopted
        an "armed neutrality" stance and amended the militia law of KY to
        compel the "State Guard" to take an oath of allegiance not only to KY,
        but also to the U.S. This "State Guard" was inclined toward the CSA
        however, so being forced to take the oath did not equate to support.
        It did, however, stop the use of this armed force in pushing the state
        toward the CSA. A new body which soon spread throughout the state was
        formed in Louisville by their city council called the "Home Guard". It
        was very pro-Union, and was used to check the "State Guard". The "Home
        Guard" had both more men and more equipment. It was when this happened
        men like Simon Buckner resigned their commissions as officers of the
        "State Guard" and officially joined the CSA. By September, 1861, 3 CSA
        camps were located just over the southern border of the state.
        Similarly, the Union had established camps on the nothern state border.
        Between these boundaries, the state's citizens must have been reeling.
        It was when Polk pleaded military necessity to occupy Columbus on
        Sept. 5 that Grant occupied Paducah on Sept. 7. Once these troops
        were within the boundaries of the state, KY was forced to abandon her
        neutrality and make a stance one way or the other in alliance. The
        only other option would have been to maintain neutrality by resisting
        both powers which by that time seems all but impossible IMHO. The KY
        State Legislature called on the Federal government to assist in
        expelling Polk, thereby committing KY to the Union. By Nov. 1, 1/3 of
        the state was in possession of the Confederacy. A provisional
        government was established in Russelville which refused to recognize
        the earlier government act which had committed KY to the USA by stating
        that it was an unfair political move and not indicative of the majority
        of the inhabitants true sentiments. CSA KY soldiers adopted an
        ordinance of secession at this convention. Buell was given command of
        the Dept. of the Ohio, headquarted in Louisville, and began organizing
        and equiping the scattered Union forces in the state for an anticipated
        drive toward the Confederates. Southern soldiers, too, began
        organizing in Bowling Green and strengthed their lines from Columbus
        through Mundordville to the Cumberland Gap. The stage was set and it
        was only a matter of time before act one began.

        As far as sympathies one way or the other, "Historical Times Ad
        Nauseum" states 76,000 Kentuckians served with Union forces and about
        25,000 with the CSA. If one can use these figures as any sort of a
        basis, it would seem the state was indeed mostly pro-Union. Whatever
        their allegiance, 30,000 of these men died (10,000 of wounds and 20,000
        of disease and exposure) fighting for their beiefs.

        Now, you all know I didn't get this off the top of my head! I just was
        doing some reading and thought I'd share what I've learned. (-:%

        MAP
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