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Question About the 44th Indiana and the Hornets nest...Shiloh

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  • Matt Meador
    I am in Memphsi so I frequently visit shiloh.....Most of my friends are in Corinth Ms. So the area is where most of my knowledge is.... Last week we made our
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 24, 2002
      I am in Memphsi so I frequently visit shiloh.....Most of my
      friends are in Corinth Ms. So the area is where most of my knowledge
      is.... Last week we made our way up to Shiloh again and we were walking
      down the " Old Sunken Road"... Well off to the left we noticed where the
      ground indented more or less looking like an old road that had been over
      grown with foliage from the years... We went down that way and it was...
      It was a road.... then we came into a clearing..... There was a monument
      in the middle of the woods for the 44th Indiana the right flank of the
      hornet's nest.....Once we proceeded into the treeline we could see make
      sift mounds.... Three to be exact.... And then there was a continuous
      mound off to the left and behind the line mound.... My question is....
      Was there any record of "digging in" on a battlefield that early in the
      war? I have seen the four inland campaign battle fields in Virginia as
      well as peninsula and cold harbor... I know what the trenches look like
      as well as rifle pits... And that is what these made out to be..
      Seeing there were numerous attacks on the hornets nest through out the
      battle I woud think that the flank would be a little more protected...


      Thanks Matt
    • slippymississippi
      ... continuous ... is.... ... the ... Virginia as ... like ... the ... protected... ... Those are likely burial mounds, where they dumped the Confederate dead
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 30, 2002
        --- In civilwarwest@y..., Matt Meador <historyb@b...> wrote:
        > sift mounds.... Three to be exact.... And then there was a
        continuous
        > mound off to the left and behind the line mound.... My question
        is....
        > Was there any record of "digging in" on a battlefield that early in
        the
        > war? I have seen the four inland campaign battle fields in
        Virginia as
        > well as peninsula and cold harbor... I know what the trenches look
        like
        > as well as rifle pits... And that is what these made out to be..
        > Seeing there were numerous attacks on the hornets nest through out
        the
        > battle I woud think that the flank would be a little more
        protected...
        >

        Those are likely burial mounds, where they dumped the Confederate
        dead in trenches five bodies deep.

        I don't believe there was ever any time to "dig in" at the Hornets
        Nest. Prentiss fell back to that position after the first assault,
        and the fighting was more or less continuous after that point.
      • theme_music
        I too noticed the features I believe you speak of during my last visit to Shiloh. I had intended to ask the Park Ranger about it but, I pulled a Lew Wallace,
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 2, 2002
          I too noticed the features I believe you speak of during my last
          visit to Shiloh. I had intended to ask the Park Ranger about it but,
          I pulled a Lew Wallace, taking the long way back to my car, and
          didn't get back to the visitors center till after dark.

          These sunken roads form from wagon ruts and erosion. Eventually, if
          not maintained or improved, they become unusable. The farmer then
          makes a new road, and the old one becomes overgrown. There are quite
          a few examples of this on my uncle's farm in Pennsylvania.

          Though I have no evidence to back this up, this is what it looked
          like to me. The battlefield continued to be used as farmland for
          about 40 years, IIRC, until it was turned over to the Park Service.
          Over that period of time, it is very likely an already sunken road
          would either be abandoned, unless it had been improved to keep it
          usable. So I think undoubtedly, the road had changed from it's
          condition on the day of the battle. The Park Service then went about
          restoring the area to how they believe it was during the battle, with
          the assistance of many participants and locals.

          Anyway....

          Eric

          --- In civilwarwest@y..., "slippymississippi"
          <slippymississippi@y...> wrote:
          > --- In civilwarwest@y..., Matt Meador <historyb@b...> wrote:
          > > sift mounds.... Three to be exact.... And then there was a
          > continuous
          > > mound off to the left and behind the line mound.... My question
          > is....
          > > Was there any record of "digging in" on a battlefield that early
          in
          > the
          > > war? I have seen the four inland campaign battle fields in
          > Virginia as
          > > well as peninsula and cold harbor... I know what the trenches
          look
          > like
          > > as well as rifle pits... And that is what these made out to be..
          > > Seeing there were numerous attacks on the hornets nest through
          out
          > the
          > > battle I woud think that the flank would be a little more
          > protected...
          > >
          >
          > Those are likely burial mounds, where they dumped the Confederate
          > dead in trenches five bodies deep.
          >
          > I don't believe there was ever any time to "dig in" at the Hornets
          > Nest. Prentiss fell back to that position after the first assault,
          > and the fighting was more or less continuous after that point.
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