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Ltr #53 Schofield, Veteran Corps, by H. B. Talbert

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  • Jack Hultquist
    [CLICK HERE for Harrison s picture. Tintype photographs are mirror-like images where right is left and left is right. The tintype of Harrison was probably
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2002
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      [CLICK HERE for Harrison's picture.
       
      Tintype photographs are mirror-like images where right is left and left is right.  The tintype of Harrison was probably taken at St. Louis in November 1863.  By then Harrison was 21, had served two of his three years, and had seen six of his best friends killed.]
       
      No  30   Camp Jackson St" Louis Mo   Nov" 29th 1863

                    Dear Brother Alpheus;

             After a delay of several days I seat myself this cold and disagreeable Sabbathday to write you a few lines in answer to yours that came to hand in due time, which had been anxiously looked for, for several weeks.  I expect you will think strange after waiting this long, that I have nothing of interest to write, but however it is true, which my letter will plainly show for itself.  I am in excellent health and spirits.  Franklin is complaining this morning with a bad cold, which is common in camp, as we have had very disagreeable weather for the last three or four days.  And for the last two days it has been as cold as I ever want to see it while soldiering, and we are still laying here exposed to all the inclement weather when there is barricks enough laying idle to hold half a dozen batteries.  I think if we winter here, that we will shortly move into the barricks.  We see quite easy times here.  Our forage, wood, water and rations are all delivered to us here in camp.  Wood sells for $8.00 per cord [pile 8’X4’X4’] here in the city, that alone costs Uncle Sam considerable but he is liberal and gives enough to answer our purposes. When we was paid off I concluded to send some money home, but since [then] my teeth has been bothering considerable, and I have concluded to spend apart of my earnings in getting them repaired [ouch].  I also have spent some in getting photographs, I exchange with the boys and if nothing happens I will get about two dozen together and then I expect to get an album and send all home.

             Some twenty four of our boys have reenlisted into the Veteran Corps, and several more of them are talking of reenlisting.  I would not be surprised if one half the Battery went in before spring.  That $402.00 bounty is a great inducement to most of the boys, but money is no inducement to me.  I will never enlist for the sole purpose of money.  Our boys got between $100.00 & $200.00 upon reenlisting, and they spend it upon the rule of come easy, go easy.  Several of them has bought a full rig of citizens clothes, and they pass as such through all parts of the city.  A soldier can go or come at his leisure during the day, but at night they have to [have] a pass signed by the Post Commander and resigned by the Provost Martial and then it is not respected if caught in certain places, but it will pass me in any place I want to go.  We get the news here from all parts of the U. S. but I dont know whether you do or not.  But if you get it from this section you already know how well every loyal man likes Genrl" Schofield.  He is considered a Union man by a great many but I cannot construe it in that light.  And I have my reasons, censuring him as disloyal, founded on facts, but I can not here enter into a full detail but will give one item that seems to me alone, ought to remove him from his present position.  He has suppressed a number of the best Union Papers in the state from the simple fact that they were radicals.  I sent one or two numbers of the Rolla Express home which you can judge for yourselves whether it is loyal or not.  He arrested it’s editor, but released him on conditions forbidding him from editing his paper.  Many people in this state think Lincoln doing wrong in keeping Schofield in his present position, and in this is only thing I can fault him [Lincoln] for.  I rcvd a letter from Mother a few days ago, and I rcvd one from Uncle since I commenced writing this. Me & Frank has agreed to write a letter home turn about, him write one week, and me the next.  This way you can hear from us once a week and I think this is sufficient, unless we had more to write about.

                So for the present farewell,       Harrison Talbert

       

       

      [The following is on a separate piece of paper that is most likely a P. S. to Harrison’s Nov. 29, 1863 letter to brother Alpheus.  Notice Alpheus’ wife, Eliza, is mentioned and the picture of their son Harrison Fremont Talbert is mentioned again.]

       

      P. S.  I either heard or dreampt that the old man Wilcoxon departed this life some time ago.  I think Mother spoke a word or two about it sometime back.  I want to know the particulars for it seems to me good deal like a dream.  I also want to know if Scallys Folks have heard from Addison and Anderson since they left and so on etc. And another thing I forgot, [baby] Fremonts picture looks very natural, still I think he was surely mad and pouting when it was taken.  Eliza’s cakes was the best in the box and Mariah’s next best.  I am almost ashamed of my letter but I hope you will consider my chance and excuse all mistakes.  Write again as soon as convenient.

           Yours affectionately       Harrison Talbert

                To all whom it may concern or wish to read it.

       

       

      [Available to the first 100 e-mail respondents who include their mailing address.  FREE CD that includes a quality scanned copy of each letter in Harrison B. Talbert's collection plus enlightening historical data and CW memorabilia graphics.  If you use Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator and enjoyed any portion of these letters, you will enjoy the CD.  Send requests and mailing address to jahultqu@...  ]

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • Charles Pate
      Dear Jack, I forgot my mailing address. It is Charles Pate P.O. Box 6322 Falls Church, VA 22040 Charlie ... From: Jack Hultquist To:
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Jack,
        I forgot my mailing address. It is
        Charles Pate
        P.O. Box 6322
        Falls Church, VA 22040
         
        Charlie
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, September 01, 2002 7:11 AM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Ltr #53 Schofield, Veteran Corps, by H. B. Talbert

        [CLICK HERE for Harrison's picture.
         
        Tintype photographs are mirror-like images where right is left and left is right.  The tintype of Harrison was probably taken at St. Louis in November 1863.  By then Harrison was 21, had served two of his three years, and had seen six of his best friends killed.]
         
        No  30   Camp Jackson St" Louis Mo   Nov" 29th 1863

                      Dear Brother Alpheus;

               After a delay of several days I seat myself this cold and disagreeable Sabbathday to write you a few lines in answer to yours that came to hand in due time, which had been anxiously looked for, for several weeks.  I expect you will think strange after waiting this long, that I have nothing of interest to write, but however it is true, which my letter will plainly show for itself.  I am in excellent health and spirits.  Franklin is complaining this morning with a bad cold, which is common in camp, as we have had very disagreeable weather for the last three or four days.  And for the last two days it has been as cold as I ever want to see it while soldiering, and we are still laying here exposed to all the inclement weather when there is barricks enough laying idle to hold half a dozen batteries.  I think if we winter here, that we will shortly move into the barricks.  We see quite easy times here.  Our forage, wood, water and rations are all delivered to us here in camp.  Wood sells for $8.00 per cord [pile 8’X4’X4’] here in the city, that alone costs Uncle Sam considerable but he is liberal and gives enough to answer our purposes. When we was paid off I concluded to send some money home, but since [then] my teeth has been bothering considerable, and I have concluded to spend apart of my earnings in getting them repaired [ouch].  I also have spent some in getting photographs, I exchange with the boys and if nothing happens I will get about two dozen together and then I expect to get an album and send all home.

               Some twenty four of our boys have reenlisted into the Veteran Corps, and several more of them are talking of reenlisting.  I would not be surprised if one half the Battery went in before spring.  That $402.00 bounty is a great inducement to most of the boys, but money is no inducement to me.  I will never enlist for the sole purpose of money.  Our boys got between $100.00 & $200.00 upon reenlisting, and they spend it upon the rule of come easy, go easy.  Several of them has bought a full rig of citizens clothes, and they pass as such through all parts of the city.  A soldier can go or come at his leisure during the day, but at night they have to [have] a pass signed by the Post Commander and resigned by the Provost Martial and then it is not respected if caught in certain places, but it will pass me in any place I want to go.  We get the news here from all parts of the U. S. but I dont know whether you do or not.  But if you get it from this section you already know how well every loyal man likes Genrl" Schofield.  He is considered a Union man by a great many but I cannot construe it in that light.  And I have my reasons, censuring him as disloyal, founded on facts, but I can not here enter into a full detail but will give one item that seems to me alone, ought to remove him from his present position.  He has suppressed a number of the best Union Papers in the state from the simple fact that they were radicals.  I sent one or two numbers of the Rolla Express home which you can judge for yourselves whether it is loyal or not.  He arrested it’s editor, but released him on conditions forbidding him from editing his paper.  Many people in this state think Lincoln doing wrong in keeping Schofield in his present position, and in this is only thing I can fault him [Lincoln] for.  I rcvd a letter from Mother a few days ago, and I rcvd one from Uncle since I commenced writing this. Me & Frank has agreed to write a letter home turn about, him write one week, and me the next.  This way you can hear from us once a week and I think this is sufficient, unless we had more to write about.

                  So for the present farewell,       Harrison Talbert

         

         

        [The following is on a separate piece of paper that is most likely a P. S. to Harrison’s Nov. 29, 1863 letter to brother Alpheus.  Notice Alpheus’ wife, Eliza, is mentioned and the picture of their son Harrison Fremont Talbert is mentioned again.]

         

        P. S.  I either heard or dreampt that the old man Wilcoxon departed this life some time ago.  I think Mother spoke a word or two about it sometime back.  I want to know the particulars for it seems to me good deal like a dream.  I also want to know if Scallys Folks have heard from Addison and Anderson since they left and so on etc. And another thing I forgot, [baby] Fremonts picture looks very natural, still I think he was surely mad and pouting when it was taken.  Eliza’s cakes was the best in the box and Mariah’s next best.  I am almost ashamed of my letter but I hope you will consider my chance and excuse all mistakes.  Write again as soon as convenient.

             Yours affectionately       Harrison Talbert

                  To all whom it may concern or wish to read it.

         

         

        [Available to the first 100 e-mail respondents who include their mailing address.  FREE CD that includes a quality scanned copy of each letter in Harrison B. Talbert's collection plus enlightening historical data and CW memorabilia graphics.  If you use Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator and enjoyed any portion of these letters, you will enjoy the CD.  Send requests and mailing address to jahultqu@...  ]

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         



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