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Ltr #52 Camp Jackson, St. Louis, by H. B. Talbert

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  • Jack Hultquist
    [Camp Jackson was originally built by southern sympathizers. Bitters - A beverage for stimulating the appetite and digestion. Some bitters contained alcohol.]
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 1, 2002
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      [Camp Jackson was originally built by southern sympathizers.

       

      Bitters - A beverage for stimulating the appetite and digestion.  Some bitters contained alcohol.]

       

       

      No 28

      Camp Jackson [at] St Louis Mo

                      November 8th / 63

      Dear Parents

             Through the mercies of kind providence my life is still spared and I am blessed with good health and the privilege of again writing you a few lines: Franklin is with us, and able for duty but is not yet quite as stout as he was before he was taken sick.  William Worth and two or three more was left sick in the hospital at Rolla, all the rest of the boys are hearty and in fine spirits.  We are all rejoiced at the change that has been made in positions since I last wrote.  We left Rolla [by railroad] on the 2nd inst and arrived safe at this place [St. Louis] the same evening.  We are camped about three miles west of the river in the outskirts of town, the street cars run with in two hundred yards of camp and our boys hardly ever let them go or come empty.  We have got the nicest camp here that we ever have had since we have been in the service it seems as though we have just emerged from a great wilderness into civilization and for my part I dont care how long we stay here but it is generally thought by all that we will not stay here long but our final destination is not known.  Our Battery is in good trim, our harness & carriages look splendid since they have been fixed up, and our horses are in tolerable good fix.

             One of our boys has gon[e] home to recruit.  His name is John O Cothrell and he is now in Shelbyville Ind", boarding at the Bennett House. He is a good hearted kind of fellow and if you would call and see him you might gain a good deal of inflamation [information] in regard to this Battery.  That box you sent us arrived at Rolla the same evening that we got here.  It was immediately sent back here [St Louis] and we have it now in our care.  We had to pay $1.50 extra charges from Rolla back here.  The socks and shirts suits me first rate.  The chickens were all spoilt and the can of pickled pears was spoilt, the can was broke.  The bottle of bitters was broke and had run over a good deal of cake and dried apples.  From the taste the bitters gave the apples & cake we would not of drank much of it if it had not been spilt.  The butter is good and cakes, except the bitters on them.  The cakes Eliza sent was all smashed to pieces, they made good spoon victuals [food].  That picture of Monts [baby Harrison Fremont Talbert] looks natural except he looks as though he was mad & pouting when it was taken.  I will have to quit and go to the burial of a Major.  Hoping these few lines will find you all well.  I will close

                                                                 H. Talbert

       

      P. S.  We are well satisfied with our box and for the next week to come we will feast on the contents.  We are ten times obliged to all concerned in sending it.  Except [Accept] our thanks for that is all we can tender to you now.

       

       

       

       

       

    • fishx111@cs.com
      Question??? Does anyone know how you could send chicken?The can of pickled pears, did they pickle these,or were they canned?a lot of soldiers died from disease
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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        Question???

        Does anyone know how you could send chicken?The can of pickled pears, did
        they pickle these,or were they canned?a lot of soldiers died from disease
        andthe chicked sounds like an instant real sick or death.I know the salted
        pork and jerkied beef, but chicken.

        Was Camp JACKSON , ANDREW,THOMAS??


        James Fish
      • WmHiram
        ... pears, did ... disease ... salted ... James, there was a home canning process in which a whole cooked chicken could be put up in a metal can (rather than a
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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          --- In civilwarwest@y..., fishx111@c... wrote:
          > Question???
          >
          > Does anyone know how you could send chicken?The can of pickled
          pears, did
          > they pickle these,or were they canned?a lot of soldiers died from
          disease
          > andthe chicked sounds like an instant real sick or death.I know the
          salted
          > pork and jerkied beef, but chicken.
          >
          > Was Camp JACKSON , ANDREW,THOMAS??
          >
          >
          > James Fish

          James, there was a home canning process in which a whole cooked
          chicken could be put up in a metal can (rather than a jar).
          Unfortunately, the spoilage rate was high. I read a letter from a
          Union surgeon once in which he said he could tell which boxes had the
          canned chickens in them from the horrible smell!

          When I get home I'll consult my period cookbooks and see if any of
          them describe the process.

          Billie
        • wh_keene
          ... It was probably named for Clairborne Fox Jackson
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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            --- In civilwarwest@y..., fishx111@c... wrote:

            > Was Camp JACKSON , ANDREW,THOMAS??
            >
            >
            > James Fish


            It was probably named for Clairborne Fox Jackson
          • ACES_DUGOUT
            Hi Y all The tinned foods were available from kippers to olives in pickled or regular. and I would agree that food poising probably played a part. The Boys in
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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              Hi Y'all
              The tinned foods were available from kippers to olives in pickled or regular.
              and I would agree that food poising probably played a part.
               The Boys in Arkansas had Canned Lobster and Ham Bully beef and Pheasant captured from a Sutlers stores.
              Yours in Service
              James Acerra
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, August 02, 2002 1:29 PM
              Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Ltr #52 Camp Jackson, St. Louis, by H. B. Talbert

              Question???

              Does anyone know how you could send chicken?The can of pickled pears, did
              they pickle these,or were they canned?a lot of soldiers died from disease
              andthe chicked sounds like an instant real sick or death.I know the salted
              pork and jerkied beef, but chicken.

              Was Camp JACKSON , ANDREW,THOMAS??


              James Fish


              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            • carlw4514
              Hadn t heard that the canning process went back that far. Canning meat as opposed to vegetables is always trickier. A friend had a funny story about that: he
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                Hadn't heard that the canning process went back that far. Canning meat
                as opposed to vegetables is always trickier. A friend had a funny
                story about that: he was to can his meat [chili?] in jars in a
                pressure cooker for a considerable time, but had to then take it off
                the heat. Well, he forgot and left it on there way too long. As
                quickly as he could get the pressure off it, then, he did so, sighing
                a sigh of relief, leaving the jars off the heat and cooling.
                Fortunately he had walked out of the kitchen: the jars had reached the
                boiling point and exploded, totally trashing everything in the kitchen
                including the ceiling ---

                --- In civilwarwest@y..., "ACES_DUGOUT" <acesdugout@c...> wrote:
                > Hi Y'all
                > The tinned foods were available from kippers to olives in pickled or
                regular.
                > and I would agree that food poising probably played a part.
                > The Boys in Arkansas had Canned Lobster and Ham Bully beef and
                Pheasant captured from a Sutlers stores.
                > Yours in Service
                > James Acerra
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: fishx111@c...
                > To: civilwarwest@y...
                > Sent: Friday, August 02, 2002 1:29 PM
                > Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Ltr #52 Camp Jackson, St. Louis, by H.
                B. Talbert
                >
                >
                > Question???
                >
                > Does anyone know how you could send chicken?The can of pickled
                pears, did
                > they pickle these,or were they canned?a lot of soldiers died from
                disease
                > andthe chicked sounds like an instant real sick or death.I know
                the salted
                > pork and jerkied beef, but chicken.
                >
                > Was Camp JACKSON , ANDREW,THOMAS??
                >
                >
                > James Fish
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                > ADVERTISEMENT
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              • fishx111@cs.com
                BILLIE: I didnt know back in that time frame they could can such things as meat safely.I thought they preserved through salting and drying such as jerky.I have
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                  BILLIE:





                  I didnt know back in that time frame they could can such things as meat
                  safely.I thought they preserved through salting and drying such as jerky.I
                  have helped my mother can fruits and vegetables pickle beets, cucumbers, but
                  never meat.It was always a rather trying time for me, because,I did some of
                  the bean snapping, corn chucking, peach peeling, slicing,tomato peeling
                  etc.Then I knew the pressure cooker would explode.Everything had to seal
                  properly, the mason jars had to be sanitary,etc.But this was a time frame
                  when we knew abt sanitation.Back in the 1860s ,they would use the same
                  scalpel etc.The chicken just sounded real real risky. James
                • WmHiram
                  Here are a couple of websites which talk about the history of canned foods. The second has pictures of original cans, albeit not from the American Civil War.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                    Here are a couple of websites which talk about the history of canned
                    foods. The second has pictures of original cans, albeit not from the
                    American Civil War.

                    http://www.cancentral.com/history.htm

                    http://www.cannedfood.org/history.html

                    And for all you food buffs (like me) here is a food timeline, with
                    recipes!
                    http://www.gti.net/mocolib1/kid/food.html

                    Billie


                    --- In civilwarwest@y..., "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...> wrote:
                    > Hadn't heard that the canning process went back that far. Canning
                    meat
                    > as opposed to vegetables is always trickier. A friend had a funny
                    > story about that: he was to can his meat [chili?] in jars in a
                    > pressure cooker for a considerable time, but had to then take it off
                    > the heat. Well, he forgot and left it on there way too long. As
                    > quickly as he could get the pressure off it, then, he did so,
                    sighing
                    > a sigh of relief, leaving the jars off the heat and cooling.
                    > Fortunately he had walked out of the kitchen: the jars had reached
                    the
                    > boiling point and exploded, totally trashing everything in the
                    kitchen
                    > including the ceiling ---
                    >
                    > --- In civilwarwest@y..., "ACES_DUGOUT" <acesdugout@c...> wrote:
                    > > Hi Y'all
                    > > The tinned foods were available from kippers to olives in pickled
                    or
                    > regular.
                    > > and I would agree that food poising probably played a part.
                    > > The Boys in Arkansas had Canned Lobster and Ham Bully beef and
                    > Pheasant captured from a Sutlers stores.
                    > > Yours in Service
                    > > James Acerra
                    > >
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: fishx111@c...
                    > > To: civilwarwest@y...
                    > > Sent: Friday, August 02, 2002 1:29 PM
                    > > Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Ltr #52 Camp Jackson, St. Louis, by
                    H.
                    > B. Talbert
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Question???
                    > >
                    > > Does anyone know how you could send chicken?The can of pickled
                    > pears, did
                    > > they pickle these,or were they canned?a lot of soldiers died
                    from
                    > disease
                    > > andthe chicked sounds like an instant real sick or death.I know
                    > the salted
                    > > pork and jerkied beef, but chicken.
                    > >
                    > > Was Camp JACKSON , ANDREW,THOMAS??
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > James Fish
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                    > > ADVERTISEMENT
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                    Service.
                  • WmHiram
                    James, like I say, I need to check my period cookbooks when I get home. I m sure I read about the process in there. And I agree, home canning meat is very
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                      James, like I say, I need to check my period cookbooks when I get
                      home. I'm sure I read about the process in there. And I agree, home
                      canning meat is very risky.

                      I've done my time prepping foods for canning, myself. Snapping the
                      beans was among the worst because they're kind of fuzzy and they rub
                      your hands raw. But I've peeled the peaches and tomatoes too, and
                      shelled peas. Nowadays I'm a grownup working stiff and I just buy
                      food. And my kids think they're abused because they have to unload
                      the dishwasher!

                      Billie

                      --- In civilwarwest@y..., fishx111@c... wrote:
                      > BILLIE:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I didnt know back in that time frame they could can such things as
                      meat
                      > safely.I thought they preserved through salting and drying such as
                      jerky.I
                      > have helped my mother can fruits and vegetables pickle beets,
                      cucumbers, but
                      > never meat.It was always a rather trying time for me, because,I did
                      some of
                      > the bean snapping, corn chucking, peach peeling, slicing,tomato
                      peeling
                      > etc.Then I knew the pressure cooker would explode.Everything had to
                      seal
                      > properly, the mason jars had to be sanitary,etc.But this was a time
                      frame
                      > when we knew abt sanitation.Back in the 1860s ,they would use the
                      same
                      > scalpel etc.The chicken just sounded real real risky. James
                    • fishx111@cs.com
                      CARL : From the responses it sounds like it did.I have helped my mom can, in Mason jars.I know of people who on a group effort had their items tinned.We never
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                        CARL :


                        From the responses it sounds like it did.I have helped my mom can, in Mason
                        jars.I know of people who on a group effort had their items tinned.We never
                        exploded the pressure cooker.But as a pre teen, I knew were all doomed during
                        the 4 ,3 day periods of canning.Ater hearing all the dangers of the pressure
                        cooker , the exacting process of the slicing, having to Make sure everything
                        was" sealed", the mason jars sanitized by boiling for an" exact"
                        time'"....when I was 10yrs old and having to go through at least 35 days of
                        canning,Being a teenager was a very doubtful prospect. Then I heard the good
                        die young, so that was some solace during the canning seasons.
                        JAMES
                      • carlw4514
                        From what little canning I have done myself, the danger the pressure cooker would explode comes from letting the jars reach the boiling point and then taking
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                          From what little canning I have done myself, the danger the pressure
                          cooker would explode comes from letting the jars reach the boiling
                          point and then taking the pressure off. I think my friend had taken
                          the lid off completey on the cooker. Unless you have put a nut and
                          bolt in the escape valve, I've seen those [briefly, as I then got the
                          heck out of there].
                          --- In civilwarwest@y..., fishx111@c... wrote:
                          > CARL :
                          >
                          >
                          > From the responses it sounds like it did.I have helped my mom can,
                          in Mason
                          > jars.I know of people who on a group effort had their items
                          tinned.We never
                          > exploded the pressure cooker.But as a pre teen, I knew were all
                          doomed during
                          > the 4 ,3 day periods of canning.Ater hearing all the dangers of the
                          pressure
                          > cooker , the exacting process of the slicing, having to Make sure
                          everything
                          > was" sealed", the mason jars sanitized by boiling for an" exact"
                          > time'"....when I was 10yrs old and having to go through at least 35
                          days of
                          > canning,Being a teenager was a very doubtful prospect. Then I heard
                          the good
                          > die young, so that was some solace during the canning seasons.

                          > JAMES
                        • fishx111@cs.com
                          Billie wrote ,to paraphrase , now that Billie is grown ,Billies children are abused because they have to unload the dishwasher . My children are out on their
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 2, 2002
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                            Billie wrote ,to paraphrase ,'now that Billie is grown ,Billies children are
                            abused because they have to unload the dishwasher'.

                            My children are out on their own now,My first grandchild was born abt 2
                            months ago.They did know what an electric dishwasher is,not a manual one,they
                            did know what a paper towell is ,but not a dish towell.After they have been
                            on their own , they did learn the meaning of manual dish washer, and dish
                            towell.I abused mine in other ways, such as ,you want a car?Get a job. We did
                            assist them on this to an extent.They are really good and you gotta love em
                            forever.

                            I appreciate the in put on the food and an Answer to Talberts letter.


                            JAMES
                          • Aurelie1999@aol.com
                            If you are looking for excellent CW recipes here is a fantastic collection with info from Civil War Interactive:
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 5, 2002
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                              If you are looking for excellent CW recipes here is a fantastic collection
                              with info from Civil War Interactive: <A
                              HREF="http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/cookbook.htm">Civil War Cookbook</A>
                              or http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/cookbook.htm

                              Connie Boone
                            • WmHiram
                              Thanks, Connie, it s been quite awhile since I looked in on that site! I recalled seeing a description of the home process for putting up meat in cans in one
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 5, 2002
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                                Thanks, Connie, it's been quite awhile since I looked in on that site!

                                I recalled seeing a description of the home process for "putting up"
                                meat in cans in one of my period books. It may have been Mrs.
                                Beeton's. But my lack of organization has come back to bite me, and
                                I still haven't found it!

                                Billie

                                --- In civilwarwest@y..., Aurelie1999@a... wrote:
                                > If you are looking for excellent CW recipes here is a fantastic
                                collection
                                > with info from Civil War Interactive: <A
                                > HREF="http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/cookbook.htm">Civil War
                                Cookbook</A>
                                > or http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/cookbook.htm
                                >
                                > Connie Boone
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