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Re: Personal Story Relating to Free State of Jones

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  • dmsmith001
    Ugh. Have you read the new book out on the Free State of Jones? Dave ... GGG- ... that damned ... from ... deserted ... Mississippi ... as ... the ... from
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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      Ugh.

      Have you read the new book out on the Free State of Jones?

      Dave

      --- In civilwarwest@y..., "slippymississippi"
      <slippymississippi@y...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a friend whose oral family history includes a tale of his
      GGG-
      > grandfather, a man up in years, who tried to stay out of
      that "damned
      > Confederate War" but was conscripted into the 6th Mississippi
      > Infantry. He joined the unit, got in a couple of scrapes, then
      > showed up back at the house in early 1863 in time for planting
      > season. Early the next year, two guys showed up at the door and
      > asked to see him in private. Minutes later, a gunshot rang out
      from
      > down the road and he was never seen from again.
      >
      > Out of curiosity, I looked up his service record and regimental
      > history. His history closely parallels that of Newt Knight, leader
      > of the Free State of Jones. He was conscripted in 1862. He
      deserted
      > after passage of the "20 Negro Law," got captured and sent back to
      > his unit, and escaped again just before the Vicksburg Campaign.
      >
      > In early 1864, Grant and Sherman's destruction in central
      Mississippi
      > had left much of the area in chaos and open rebellion against the
      > Confederate government. The 6th Mississippi Infantry Regiment (my
      > friend's GGG-Grandfather's own regiment) was dispatched to Raleigh
      as
      > a summary execution squad tasked with hunting down and destroying
      the
      > rebels of the Free State of Jones. So it appears that my friend's
      > GGG-Grandfather was summarily executed by friends and neighbors
      from
      > his own regiment as part of the sweep to eliminate the insurgency
      in
      > central Mississippi.
    • slippymississippi
      ... I just ordered that book, and Slave Patrols. My friend was pretty emotionally torn up that his GGG-grandfather was shot in the Free State of Jones sweep
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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        --- In civilwarwest@y..., "dmsmith001" <dmsmith001@y...> wrote:
        > Ugh.
        >
        > Have you read the new book out on the Free State of Jones?
        >
        > Dave

        I just ordered that book, and "Slave Patrols."

        My friend was pretty emotionally torn up that his GGG-grandfather was
        shot in the Free State of Jones sweep of central Mississippi. He's
        an unreconstructed save-the-flag type who has always asserted that
        there never was a Free State of Jones, and that Knight's men and the
        men caught up in the sweep were bushwackers and bandits.

        I'll give him a few days to recover emotionally, then try to use this
        time to recruit him in the he-man Confederate-haters club.
      • slippymississippi
        Another website on the Peace Society: http://www.rmcleod.com/6thalabama/history.htm In early December 1863, the dubious quality of the recruits in the
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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          Another website on the "Peace Society:"

          http://www.rmcleod.com/6thalabama/history.htm

          In early December 1863, the dubious quality of the recruits in the
          brigade's infantry regiments came back to haunt CLANTON, and
          permanently changed the mission of all regiments in the brigade. 60
          of 300 men - nearly all from the two infantry regiments - laid down
          their arms while on picket duty near Gonzales (about 15 miles from
          Pensacola), and refused to fight as part of an orchestrated plan by
          the 'Peace Society', a secret organization with special identifying
          handshakes and signals. The so-called 'Peace Men' had earlier roots
          among officers and enlisted men in units of BRAGG's Army of
          Tennessee, especially in East Tennessee. CLANTON addressed the
          problem swiftly and decisively. The military courts that tried the
          mutineers completely vindicated CLANTON, and the cavalry regiments do
          not appear to have been involved. However, the reputation of the
          entire brigade among senior C.S.A. officers was permanently stained,
          and all regiments remained suspect as to their reliability despite
          their subsequent peformance on the battlefield. The regimental
          elements of the brigade seldom fought together as a unified command -
          they were quickly dispersed to 'temporary' assignments in other
          commands away from the home territory that had been their original
          mission and reason for existence.
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