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Re: The Value of Vicksburg

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  • dmsmith001
    If he d had the Van Dorn / Red Jackson division of cavalry, still - yes. To me, that s the true effect of no cavalry - inability to deal with Grant s rear once
    Message 1 of 45 , Jul 2 11:56 AM
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      If he'd had the Van Dorn / Red Jackson division of cavalry, still -
      yes.

      To me, that's the true effect of no cavalry - inability to deal with
      Grant's rear once Grant moved on Raymond.

      One could argue that perhaps Grant can't get to Raymond / Jackson,
      with an energetic cavalry force operating in his rear.

      Dave

      --- In civilwarwest@y..., "wh_keene" <wh_keene@y...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@y..., "dmsmith001" <dmsmith001@y...> wrote:
      > > --- In civilwarwest@y..., "wh_keene" <wh_keene@y...> wrote:
      > > > Wasn't this tried (and failed) at Milliken's Bend and Helena?
      > >
      > > I'd suggest it was half-assed, and too late.
      > >
      > > If we're looking for windows of opportunity, we're talking April
      > and
      > > May of 1863.
      > >
      > > Dave
      >
      >
      > Agreed. Do you think Pemberton missed an opportunity after Grant
      had
      > moved in land to send a force across the Big Black near its mouth
      and
      > attempt to retake Grand Gulf and Port Gibson?
    • Aurelie1999@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/16/02 7:39:01 PM Central Daylight Time, dmsmith001@yahoo.com writes:
      Message 45 of 45 , Jul 16 5:45 PM
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        In a message dated 7/16/02 7:39:01 PM Central Daylight Time,
        dmsmith001@... writes:

        << I agree. Sometimes it's the back of the scene contributions from
        willing men like Hurlbut that make all the difference in a campaign.
        To the best of my knowledge, Hurlbut didn't squawk a bit when Grant
        called on him for reinforcements.
        >>

        Seems to me the only time Grant and Hurlbut disagreed was in how Dodge was
        handling payment to his operatives. IIRC the situation was handled quickly
        and with no obviously hard feelings. Working in tandem was the optimum
        situation, but too often egos or personal agendas muddied the water to the
        detriment of the objective. Grant's talent was to somehow arrange it so that
        his subordinates were his men.

        Connie
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