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[civilwarwest] Bragg RE- ReConsidered

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  • L.A. Chambliss
    VERY interesting question indeed! However, for those of us who are recovering Eastern-Theater addicts or new to the CW in general and not yet up-to-speed on
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 26, 1999
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      VERY interesting question indeed! However, for those of us who are
      recovering Eastern-Theater addicts or new to the CW in general and not yet
      up-to-speed on matters in the West, how about some time just considering
      Bragg (or other commanders and activities) before we get into
      re-consideration thereof?

      For instance, Steve writes:

      "...some of the general's truly significant military achievements during the
      conflict, he took command of command of the primary field Army in the
      Western theatre, at a time that was in total disarray and disorganization.
      Yet, within a mere two months he had completely reversed the strategic
      initiative and carried
      the war from the middle of East Mississippi to the outskirts of
      Louisville Kentucky."

      How about filling us in on this, or suggesting sources for further reading
      on this campaign? What were the dates, who were the opponents, what happened
      after he got to Louisville.....stuff like that.

      It would help bring many of us up to speed. We have to know what happened
      the first time around before we can have any opinions on how it could have
      been done differently.

      Just a thought...;)

      Laurie (Xan) Chambliss
    • L.A. Chambliss
      VERY interesting question indeed! However, for those of us who are recovering Eastern-Theater addicts or new to the CW in general and not yet up-to-speed on
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 26, 1999
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        VERY interesting question indeed! However, for those of us who are
        recovering Eastern-Theater addicts or new to the CW in general and not yet
        up-to-speed on matters in the West, how about some time just considering
        Bragg (or other commanders and activities) before we get into
        re-consideration thereof?

        For instance, Steve writes:

        "...some of the general's truly significant military achievements during the
        conflict, he took command of command of the primary field Army in the
        Western theatre, at a time that was in total disarray and disorganization.
        Yet, within a mere two months he had completely reversed the strategic
        initiative and carried
        the war from the middle of East Mississippi to the outskirts of
        Louisville Kentucky."

        How about filling us in on this, or suggesting sources for further reading
        on this campaign? What were the dates, who were the opponents, what happened
        after he got to Louisville.....stuff like that.

        It would help bring many of us up to speed. We have to know what happened
        the first time around before we can have any opinions on how it could have
        been done differently.

        Just a thought...;)

        Laurie (Xan) Chambliss
      • michael.d.cantor@us.arthurandersen.com
        I d like to pose one other issue, if I may. Bragg s influence did not stop once he was relieved (or relieved himself) of command of the AoT. If you refer to
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 27, 1999
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          I'd like to pose one other issue, if I may. Bragg's influence did not stop
          once he was relieved (or relieved himself) of command of the AoT. If you refer
          to Wiley Sword's "Embrace An Angry Wind", you can see that Bragg was quite
          influential in not only deciding to replace Johnson with Hood, but that he was
          also one of Hood's most ardent supporters after Atlanta. This is relatively
          important considering Bragg's influence with Davis as a friend and advisor. But
          Sword asserts that, in part, Bragg's decisions and support for Hood were driven
          by his extreme bitterness towards those which undermined his authority as
          commander (Hardee, Clebourne, to name a few), and that he used these situations
          as opportunities to exact revenge on these generals. One which received so much
          of the brunt of these attacks is Clebourne, who is passed up for corps command
          not once but four times, due in part to the advice of Bragg.

          In short, Bragg may not have possessed those qualities associated with great
          commanders, but he did possess those which made him a bad one. His inability to
          manage relationships between himself and his subordinates, his inability to
          compromise, and his utter vindictiveness against those who defied him or his
          authority tend to undermine or erase any of Bragg's positive traits as a
          commander (he did have some, you know!!!)

          Just my humble ramblings!

          Take care,

          Mike Cantor


          To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
          cc: (bcc: Michael D. Cantor)
          Date: 09/26/99 08:28 PM
          From: xanthipp@...
          Subject: [civilwarwest] Bragg RE- ReConsidered




          VERY interesting question indeed! However, for those of us who are
          recovering Eastern-Theater addicts or new to the CW in general and not yet
          up-to-speed on matters in the West, how about some time just considering
          Bragg (or other commanders and activities) before we get into
          re-consideration thereof?

          For instance, Steve writes:

          "...some of the general's truly significant military achievements during the
          conflict, he took command of command of the primary field Army in the
          Western theatre, at a time that was in total disarray and disorganization.
          Yet, within a mere two months he had completely reversed the strategic
          initiative and carried
          the war from the middle of East Mississippi to the outskirts of
          Louisville Kentucky."

          How about filling us in on this, or suggesting sources for further reading
          on this campaign? What were the dates, who were the opponents, what happened
          after he got to Louisville.....stuff like that.

          It would help bring many of us up to speed. We have to know what happened
          the first time around before we can have any opinions on how it could have
          been done differently.

          Just a thought...;)

          Laurie (Xan) Chambliss




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        • michael.d.cantor@us.arthurandersen.com
          I d like to pose one other issue, if I may. Bragg s influence did not stop once he was relieved (or relieved himself) of command of the AoT. If you refer to
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 27, 1999
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            I'd like to pose one other issue, if I may. Bragg's influence did not stop
            once he was relieved (or relieved himself) of command of the AoT. If you refer
            to Wiley Sword's "Embrace An Angry Wind", you can see that Bragg was quite
            influential in not only deciding to replace Johnson with Hood, but that he was
            also one of Hood's most ardent supporters after Atlanta. This is relatively
            important considering Bragg's influence with Davis as a friend and advisor. But
            Sword asserts that, in part, Bragg's decisions and support for Hood were driven
            by his extreme bitterness towards those which undermined his authority as
            commander (Hardee, Clebourne, to name a few), and that he used these situations
            as opportunities to exact revenge on these generals. One which received so much
            of the brunt of these attacks is Clebourne, who is passed up for corps command
            not once but four times, due in part to the advice of Bragg.

            In short, Bragg may not have possessed those qualities associated with great
            commanders, but he did possess those which made him a bad one. His inability to
            manage relationships between himself and his subordinates, his inability to
            compromise, and his utter vindictiveness against those who defied him or his
            authority tend to undermine or erase any of Bragg's positive traits as a
            commander (he did have some, you know!!!)

            Just my humble ramblings!

            Take care,

            Mike Cantor


            To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
            cc: (bcc: Michael D. Cantor)
            Date: 09/26/99 08:28 PM
            From: xanthipp@...
            Subject: [civilwarwest] Bragg RE- ReConsidered




            VERY interesting question indeed! However, for those of us who are
            recovering Eastern-Theater addicts or new to the CW in general and not yet
            up-to-speed on matters in the West, how about some time just considering
            Bragg (or other commanders and activities) before we get into
            re-consideration thereof?

            For instance, Steve writes:

            "...some of the general's truly significant military achievements during the
            conflict, he took command of command of the primary field Army in the
            Western theatre, at a time that was in total disarray and disorganization.
            Yet, within a mere two months he had completely reversed the strategic
            initiative and carried
            the war from the middle of East Mississippi to the outskirts of
            Louisville Kentucky."

            How about filling us in on this, or suggesting sources for further reading
            on this campaign? What were the dates, who were the opponents, what happened
            after he got to Louisville.....stuff like that.

            It would help bring many of us up to speed. We have to know what happened
            the first time around before we can have any opinions on how it could have
            been done differently.

            Just a thought...;)

            Laurie (Xan) Chambliss




            ------------------------------------------------------------------------

            eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest
            http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications











            *******************Internet Email Confidentiality Footer*******************


            Privileged/Confidential Information may be contained in this message. If you
            are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for delivery of
            the message to such person), you may not copy or deliver this message to anyone.
            In such case, you should destroy this message and kindly notify the sender by
            reply email. Please advise immediately if you or your employer does not consent
            to Internet email for messages of this kind. Opinions, conclusions and other
            information in this message that do not relate to the official business of my
            firm shall be understood as neither given nor endorsed by it.
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