Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Civil War History] Mercenaries

Expand Messages
  • deo_vindice_2000
    ... As recorded in the Official Records, Major General David Hunter advised Brigadier General Isaac I. Stevens (May 8, 1862, Hilton Head, South Carolina): I
    Message 1 of 157 , Aug 25, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      >>Blacks fighting for the union were already free.<<

      As recorded in the Official Records, Major General David Hunter
      advised Brigadier General Isaac I. Stevens (May 8, 1862, Hilton Head,
      South Carolina): "I am authorized by the War Department to form the
      negroes into 'squads, companies, or otherwise,' as I may deem most
      beneficial to the public service. I have concluded to enlist two
      regiments." Brigadier General Stevens then issued this order: "In
      accordance with....orders of Major-General Hunter...the several
      agents or overseers of plantations will send to Beaufort to-morrow
      morning every able-bodied negro between the ages of eighteen and
      forty-five, capable of bearing arms."

      Edward L. Pierce, special agent, Treasury Department, after
      witnessing the first such forced conscription on May 12 at Port
      Royal, wrote to Major General Hunter on May 13, 1862, from Pope's
      Plantation, Saint Helena Island: "scenes transpiring yesterday in the
      execution of your order...The colored people became suspicious of the
      presence of the companies of soldiers detailed for the service, who
      were marching through the islands during the night...They were taken
      from the fields without being allowed to go to their homes even to
      get a jacket...

      "There was sadness in all. As those on this plantation were called in
      from the fields, the soldiers, under orders, and while on the steps
      of my headquarters, loaded their guns, so that the negroes might see
      what would take place in case they attempted to get away.

      "On some plantations the wailing and screaming were loud and the
      women threw themselves in despair on the ground. On some plantations
      the people took to the woods and were hunted up by the soldiers...I
      doubt if the recruiting service in this country has ever been
      attended with such scenes before."




      --- In civilwarhistory2@y..., "kokoa111" <kokoa111@y...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarhistory2@y..., eddieinman <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > <<Yeah, almost like Confederates wanting slaves to fight.>>
      >
      > And that is almost as good as the yankees torturing and
      > forcing them to fight for their own freedom.
      >
      > Blacks fighting for the union were already free.
    • Christi
      ... Abraham Lincoln with regards to this?
      Message 157 of 157 , Oct 24, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        >>Have you ever read Alexander Stephen's letter to
        Abraham Lincoln with regards to this?<<

        I've never read it...is it on the web somewhere?

        --- Lisa <kokoa111@...> wrote:
        > --- In civilwarhistory2@y..., deo_vindice_2000
        > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > lincoln said that he would not interfere with
        > slavery -- that
        > DEFINITELY would have made a difference to people
        > whose only concern
        > was maintaining slavery.
        >
        > The key words in Lincoln's statement which you quite
        > intentionally
        > left out were "where it existed." Lincoln was not
        > budging on
        > allowing slavery in the territories and that
        > (popular sovereignty)
        > is the point on which all compromises failed.
        >
        > Deo: As a matter of fact, the planned thirteenth
        > amendment was to guarantee the right of slave
        > holders to continue
        > slavery perpetually, with a clause written into that
        > amendment that
        > it could never be changed nor rescinded. With
        > guarantees like that,
        > why would the South have left if the sole concern
        > was perpetuating
        > slavery?
        >
        > Because they were already gone. By the time this
        > proposed amendment
        > had passed the house the CSA was already
        > established.
        >
        > Deo: If I had one concern, and if that concern was
        > guaranteed to
        > be protected by an iron-clad contract, I'd stay
        > where that concern
        > would be protected, wouldn't you?
        >
        > I absolutely agree with you on this. After the
        > proposed 13th
        > amendment (which by the way was only ratified by one
        > state), the
        > South could have came back to the U.S. under the
        > guarantees that
        > their beloved institution would be protected, but
        > they knew there
        > were still those hostile to their institutions and
        > thus there was
        > still danger in it's eventual demise. So, they
        > stayed where their
        > Constitution protected it and their people supported
        > it. Have you
        > ever read Alexander Stephen's letter to Abraham
        > Lincoln with regards
        > to this?
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Y! Web Hosting - Let the expert host your web site
        http://webhosting.yahoo.com/
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.