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Re: [citrusmodeling] Digest Number 1801[1 Attachment]

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  • Richard Vaughan
    The big Shell storage tanks that were in Aransas Pass, Texas used to be black.  And the Shell logo really stood out.  I think the best way to describe the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 2, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      The big Shell storage tanks that were in Aransas Pass, Texas used to be black.  And the Shell logo really stood out.  I think the best way to describe the black would be Floquil "Grimy black".


      On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 12:40 AM, "citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com" <citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


      Citrus Industry Modeling Group

      6 Messages

      Digest #1801
      1a
      Re: Color of oil tanks by "Alain KAP, MMR" alain1lu
      1b
      Re: Color of oil tanks by clark3332003
      1c
      Re: Color of oil tanks by "Christopher Palermo" chris_palermo95125
      1d
      Re: Color of oil tanks by "Ed Workman" ebwx2000
      2b

      Messages

      Tue Jul 1, 2014 8:51 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Alain KAP, MMR" alain1lu

      Chris,

      I consult Tony's blog on a regular basis but he has no Shell tanks on
      his layout.

      Attached is a picture from the Historical Society of San Juan Capistrano
      showing a vertical tank with Shell lettering. It is definitely not grey
      or silver. But I'm not too good in translating b/w shades into colors.

      Thanks for your help

      --
      Alain KAP, MMR
      D-54439 SAARBURG
      NMRA # 099843-00
      SFRH&M #3590
      ____________ _________ _________ _
      Please consider your environmental responsibility before printing this
      e-mail
      ____________ _________ _________ _

      Attachment(s) from Alain KAP, MMR
      1 of 1 Photo(s)

      Tue Jul 1, 2014 8:53 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      clark3332003

      I'd wonder if the darker colour was red, but a colour photo would be good.

      '... In 1915, when the Shell Company of California first built service stations, they had to compete against other companies. Bright colours were the solution, but colours that would not offend the Californians. Because of the state’s strong Spanish connections, the red and yellow of Spain were chosen. http://www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/who-we-are/our-history/history-of-pecten.html http://www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/who-we-are/our-history/history-of-pecten.html ...'

      Phil Clark, Catarman, Philippines.











      Tue Jul 1, 2014 9:37 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Christopher Palermo" chris_palermo95125

      That's a fascinating photo. Interestingly, the second "L" in SHELL is indistinct or missing, which makes me wonder if we're seeing a tank that has been repainted in a medium gray, blue or green that didn't fully cover the original red-orange lettering. All examples I've seen, at the Ventura Oil Fields, Signal Hill and Martinez refinery used red-orange lettering, sometimes on a small yellow field or with shadowed letters, over a light gray tank. All these are refinery tanks, though, rather than bulk oil dealers, but I tend to feel that light gray would be correct to represent dealers also. Here's a corporate video from 1997 with brief refinery shots (see 1:10 in the video) that are consistent with this.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2Mo6n_lJDQ
      You might consider seeing if Shell has a corporate historian.

      Best,
      Chris

      Tue Jul 1, 2014 9:37 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Ed Workman" ebwx2000

      Older film was Orthochromatic- could 'see' green but not red.
      Before that , and concurrent with ortho cuz it was cheaper, film was
      colorblind except for blue.
      Ortho film spectrum was sufficient to permit limited use of yellow filters.
      Perhaps the almost black of the tank body is a deep yellow, or orange.
      As a color pic is almost certainly not gonna show up- who'd take a color
      snapshot of an oil tank on potato flour- go with yellow

      On Tue, Jul 1, 2014 at 3:02 AM, clark3332003@... [citrusmodeling] <
      citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      >
      >
      > I'd wonder if the darker colour was red, but a colour photo would be good.
      >
      > '... In 1915, when the Shell Company of California first built service
      > stations, they had to compete against other companies. Bright colours were
      > the solution, but colours that would not offend the Californians. Because
      > of the state’s strong Spanish connections, the red and yellow of Spain were
      > chosen.
      > http://www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/who-we-are/our-history/history-of-pecten.html
      > ...'
      >
      > Phil Clark, Catarman, Philippines.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      Tue Jul 1, 2014 9:32 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      thecitrusbelt



      I just saw this post on another group. We now have another item to add to the list of non-perishable loads known to have been shipped in refrigerator cars.



      Ken Roth writes…" I'm a little late on the discussion, but the best "non-food" ; load I ever saw was a picture in a little book on the history of Grants Pass, Oregon.



      In it was a picture of a PFE 40-10 reefer being unloaded in Grants Pass, and ... the cargo? Refrigerators !!"



      Bob Chaparro

      Moderator

      Tue Jul 1, 2014 2:11 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

      "michael bishop" goldrod_1

      In the 1960s the Santa Fe used reefer to haul grain from Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas during the "Grain Rush". Also, during the post WWII era the Santa Fe used reefers during the pre Christmas mail rush. On the GN, NP and CB&Q in the early 1900s Christmas trees were sent from the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountains area to the Mid West by REA reefers. A fresh cut pine tree delivered to your door in 4 to 5 days.

      Michael Bishop

       

      On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 9:38 AM, "thecitrusbelt@... [citrusmodeling]" <citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


       
      I just saw this post on another group.  We now have another item to add to the list
      of non-perishable loads known to have been shipped in refrigerator cars.
       
      Ken Roth writes…" I'm a little late on the discussion, but
      the best "non-food" ; load I ever saw was a picture in a little book on
      the history of Grants Pass, Oregon.
       
      In it was a picture of a PFE40-10 reefer being unloaded in Grants Pass,
      and ... the cargo?  Refrigerators !!"
       
      Bob Chaparro
      Moderator
      When replying to a message, be sure to eliminate unnecessary or redundant text.  If your reply does not directly address the original topic, add further text to the subject line.

      Please show respect and consideration for other points of view in your replies.


    • Richard Vaughan
      OH...and the Shell black Texas tanks had red lettering on a bright yellow background. On , Richard Vaughan wrote: The big Shell storage
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        OH...and the Shell black Texas tanks had red lettering on a bright yellow background.


        On , Richard Vaughan <richardv88@...> wrote:


        The big Shell storage tanks that were in Aransas Pass, Texas used to be black.  And the Shell logo really stood out.  I think the best way to describe the black would be Floquil "Grimy black".


        On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 12:40 AM, "citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com" <citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


        Citrus Industry Modeling Group

        6 Messages

        Digest #1801
        1a
        Re: Color of oil tanks by "Alain KAP, MMR" alain1lu
        1b
        Re: Color of oil tanks by clark3332003
        1c
        Re: Color of oil tanks by "Christopher Palermo" chris_palermo95125
        1d
        Re: Color of oil tanks by "Ed Workman" ebwx2000
        2b

        Messages

        Tue Jul 1, 2014 8:51 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Alain KAP, MMR" alain1lu

        Chris,

        I consult Tony's blog on a regular basis but he has no Shell tanks on
        his layout.

        Attached is a picture from the Historical Society of San Juan Capistrano
        showing a vertical tank with Shell lettering. It is definitely not grey
        or silver. But I'm not too good in translating b/w shades into colors.

        Thanks for your help

        --
        Alain KAP, MMR
        D-54439 SAARBURG
        NMRA # 099843-00
        SFRH&M #3590
        ____________ _________ _________ _
        Please consider your environmental responsibility before printing this
        e-mail
        ____________ _________ _________ _

        Attachment(s) from Alain KAP, MMR
        1 of 1 Photo(s)

        Tue Jul 1, 2014 8:53 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        clark3332003

        I'd wonder if the darker colour was red, but a colour photo would be good.

        '... In 1915, when the Shell Company of California first built service stations, they had to compete against other companies. Bright colours were the solution, but colours that would not offend the Californians. Because of the state’s strong Spanish connections, the red and yellow of Spain were chosen. http://www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/who-we-are/our-history/history-of-pecten.html http://www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/who-we-are/our-history/history-of-pecten.html ...'

        Phil Clark, Catarman, Philippines.











        Tue Jul 1, 2014 9:37 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Christopher Palermo" chris_palermo95125

        That's a fascinating photo. Interestingly, the second "L" in SHELL is indistinct or missing, which makes me wonder if we're seeing a tank that has been repainted in a medium gray, blue or green that didn't fully cover the original red-orange lettering. All examples I've seen, at the Ventura Oil Fields, Signal Hill and Martinez refinery used red-orange lettering, sometimes on a small yellow field or with shadowed letters, over a light gray tank. All these are refinery tanks, though, rather than bulk oil dealers, but I tend to feel that light gray would be correct to represent dealers also. Here's a corporate video from 1997 with brief refinery shots (see 1:10 in the video) that are consistent with this.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2Mo6n_lJDQ
        You might consider seeing if Shell has a corporate historian.

        Best,
        Chris

        Tue Jul 1, 2014 9:37 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Ed Workman" ebwx2000

        Older film was Orthochromatic- could 'see' green but not red.
        Before that , and concurrent with ortho cuz it was cheaper, film was
        colorblind except for blue.
        Ortho film spectrum was sufficient to permit limited use of yellow filters.
        Perhaps the almost black of the tank body is a deep yellow, or orange.
        As a color pic is almost certainly not gonna show up- who'd take a color
        snapshot of an oil tank on potato flour- go with yellow

        On Tue, Jul 1, 2014 at 3:02 AM, clark3332003@... [citrusmodeling] <
        citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        >
        >
        > I'd wonder if the darker colour was red, but a colour photo would be good.
        >
        > '... In 1915, when the Shell Company of California first built service
        > stations, they had to compete against other companies. Bright colours were
        > the solution, but colours that would not offend the Californians. Because
        > of the state’s strong Spanish connections, the red and yellow of Spain were
        > chosen.
        > http://www.shell.com/global/aboutshell/who-we-are/our-history/history-of-pecten.html
        > ...'
        >
        > Phil Clark, Catarman, Philippines.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        Tue Jul 1, 2014 9:32 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        thecitrusbelt



        I just saw this post on another group. We now have another item to add to the list of non-perishable loads known to have been shipped in refrigerator cars.



        Ken Roth writes…" I'm a little late on the discussion, but the best "non-food" ; load I ever saw was a picture in a little book on the history of Grants Pass, Oregon.



        In it was a picture of a PFE 40-10 reefer being unloaded in Grants Pass, and ... the cargo? Refrigerators !!"



        Bob Chaparro

        Moderator

        Tue Jul 1, 2014 2:11 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

        "michael bishop" goldrod_1

        In the 1960s the Santa Fe used reefer to haul grain from Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas during the "Grain Rush". Also, during the post WWII era the Santa Fe used reefers during the pre Christmas mail rush. On the GN, NP and CB&Q in the early 1900s Christmas trees were sent from the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountains area to the Mid West by REA reefers. A fresh cut pine tree delivered to your door in 4 to 5 days.

        Michael Bishop

         

        On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 9:38 AM, "thecitrusbelt@... [citrusmodeling]" <citrusmodeling@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         
        I just saw this post on another group.  We now have another item to add to the list
        of non-perishable loads known to have been shipped in refrigerator cars.
         
        Ken Roth writes…" I'm a little late on the discussion, but
        the best "non-food" ; load I ever saw was a picture in a little book on
        the history of Grants Pass, Oregon.
         
        In it was a picture of a PFE40-10 reefer being unloaded in Grants Pass,
        and ... the cargo?  Refrigerators !!"
         
        Bob Chaparro
        Moderator
        When replying to a message, be sure to eliminate unnecessary or redundant text.  If your reply does not directly address the original topic, add further text to the subject line.

        Please show respect and consideration for other points of view in your replies.




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