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Experimental Orange Shipment

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  • thecitrusbelt
    Here is a report on an experimental orange shipment from Southern California to England that did not involve overland rail transport to the East Coast. This
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 1, 2014
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      Here is a report on an experimental orange shipment from Southern California to England that did not involve overland rail transport to the East Coast.  This was reported in THE WESTERN FRUIT JOBBER, Volume 7, Issue 12, April 1921.

       

      I have no information as to whether this approach ever became widespread.

       

      Bob Chaparro

      Moderator

      ++++

      Experimental Orange Shipment

       

      Following closely the recent experimental shipping of citrus fruits to the Atlantic seaboard via the Panama Canal, the California Fruit Growers Exchange is planning a shipment of some 4500 boxes of oranges from San Pedro direct to Liverpool, England, the latter part of February or the first of March. The fruit, which will go under refrigeration, will be carried by the S. S. Eemdyke, of the Holland-American Line, which promises a trans-Atlantic service via the Canal with sailings about every 30 days.

       

      The fruit will be shipped to Liverpool at a cost of $1.75 a box, which is the same as the railroad rate under refrigeration simply to New York. There will thus be a saving of the rate for cargo space from New York to Liverpool.

       

      It is also pointed out that by the direct route much expensive and damaging re-handling can be eliminated and the fruit kept from the congested ports such as New York. The sailing is expected to take in the neighborhood of 25 days, which is about the time consumed in making a rail shipment to New York and consignment to England from there.

       

      If this shipment proves successful, it is likely that regular shipments of citrus fruit to European ports will be made, since prospects of a demand for California fruit in England are good.

       

      A small experimental shipment of 6 boxes of oranges were recently made from San Francisco to New York by the Union American Steamship Company. Results of these experimental shipments will be awaited with much interest.

       

      Sunkist Courier

    • Russ Bellinis
      When I worked for Sea Land as well as for Overseas Shipping Terminal on Terminal Island, Most of the out going refrigerated cargo was citrus or avocados, and
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 2, 2014
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        When I worked for Sea Land as well as for Overseas Shipping Terminal on Terminal Island, Most of the out going refrigerated cargo was citrus or avocados, and it went both to Europe and Asia.  Most went to Asia because Israel grows a  lot of citrus and avocados since their climate is very similar to Southern California and the shipping distance to Europe was shorter. 

        Sea Land did not use the Panama Canal because their ships were too big to get through it. 

        I'm guessing that the shipments of citrus by ship was probably successful in 1921 and probably continued, but I have no factual information to back that statement up.

        Russ Bellinis


        On Sat, Mar 1, 2014 at 11:40 PM, <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote:
         

        Here is a report on an experimental orange shipment from Southern California to England that did not involve overland rail transport to the East Coast.  This was reported in THE WESTERN FRUIT JOBBER, Volume 7, Issue 12, April 1921.

         

        I have no information as to whether this approach ever became widespread.

         

        Bob Chaparro

        Moderator

        ++++

        Experimental Orange Shipment

         

        Following closely the recent experimental shipping of citrus fruits to the Atlantic seaboard via the Panama Canal, the California Fruit Growers Exchange is planning a shipment of some 4500 boxes of oranges from San Pedro direct to Liverpool, England, the latter part of February or the first of March. The fruit, which will go under refrigeration, will be carried by the S. S. Eemdyke, of the Holland-American Line, which promises a trans-Atlantic service via the Canal with sailings about every 30 days.

         

        The fruit will be shipped to Liverpool at a cost of $1.75 a box, which is the same as the railroad rate under refrigeration simply to New York. There will thus be a saving of the rate for cargo space from New York to Liverpool.

         

        It is also pointed out that by the direct route much expensive and damaging re-handling can be eliminated and the fruit kept from the congested ports such as New York. The sailing is expected to take in the neighborhood of 25 days, which is about the time consumed in making a rail shipment to New York and consignment to England from there.

         

        If this shipment proves successful, it is likely that regular shipments of citrus fruit to European ports will be made, since prospects of a demand for California fruit in England are good.

         

        A small experimental shipment of 6 boxes of oranges were recently made from San Francisco to New York by the Union American Steamship Company. Results of these experimental shipments will be awaited with much interest.

         

        Sunkist Courier


      • Tom VanWormer
        Fellow Citrusmodelers, In 1895 the Peach growers of the Western Slope of Colorado where exporting peach out of the Ports of New Orleans and Galveston to
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 2, 2014
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          Fellow Citrusmodelers,
          In 1895 the Peach growers of the Western Slope of Colorado where exporting peach out of the Ports of New Orleans and Galveston to England and western Europe with great success. 
          Tom VanWormer
          Monument CO

          Russ Bellinis wrote:
           
          When I worked for Sea Land as well as for Overseas Shipping Terminal on Terminal Island, Most of the out going refrigerated cargo was citrus or avocados, and it went both to Europe and Asia.  Most went to Asia because Israel grows a  lot of citrus and avocados since their climate is very similar to Southern California and the shipping distance to Europe was shorter. 

          Sea Land did not use the Panama Canal because their ships were too big to get through it. 

          I'm guessing that the shipments of citrus by ship was probably successful in 1921 and probably continued, but I have no factual information to back that statement up.

          Russ Bellinis


          On Sat, Mar 1, 2014 at 11:40 PM, <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote:
           

          Here is a report on an experimental orange shipment from Southern California to England that did not involve overland rail transport to the East Coast.  This was reported in THE WESTERN FRUIT JOBBER, Volume 7, Issue 12, April 1921.

           

          I have no information as to whether this approach ever became widespread.

           

          Bob Chaparro

          Moderator

          ++++

          Experimental Orange Shipment

           

          Following closely the recent experimental shipping of citrus fruits to the Atlantic seaboard via the Panama Canal, the California Fruit Growers Exchange is planning a shipment of some 4500 boxes of oranges from San Pedro direct to Liverpool, England, the latter part of February or the first of March. The fruit, which will go under refrigeration, will be carried by the S. S. Eemdyke, of the Holland-American Line, which promises a trans-Atlantic service via the Canal with sailings about every 30 days.

           

          The fruit will be shipped to Liverpool at a cost of $1.75 a box, which is the same as the railroad rate under refrigeration simply to New York. There will thus be a saving of the rate for cargo space from New York to Liverpool.

           

          It is also pointed out that by the direct route much expensive and damaging re-handling can be eliminated and the fruit kept from the congested ports such as New York. The sailing is expected to take in the neighborhood of 25 days, which is about the time consumed in making a rail shipment to New York and consignment to England from there.

           

          If this shipment proves successful, it is likely that regular shipments of citrus fruit to European ports will be made, since prospects of a demand for California fruit in England are good.

           

          A small experimental shipment of 6 boxes of oranges were recently made from San Francisco to New York by the Union American Steamship Company. Results of these experimental shipments will be awaited with much interest.

           

          Sunkist Courier


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