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Re: [cia-drugs] Tom Heneghen report on July 17

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  • E Bryant Holman
    No he can t. Why didn t Clinton just fire Starr? No one can fire a special prosecutor. He was hired just for that reason. ... From: james Karl To:
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      No he can't. Why didn't Clinton just fire Starr? No one can fire a special prosecutor. He was hired just for that reason.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 11:36 AM
      Subject: Re: [cia-drugs] Tom Heneghen report on July 17

      Bullshit.  Bush as President can fire any US Attorney.

      Linda Minor <lminor@...> wrote:
      This show aired before the disclosure about the actual indictments reported by Flocco.
      =======

      http://www.total911.info/2005/07/tenet-under-investigation-for-pre-911.html
      Tom Heneghen reports to Cloak & Dagger Internet Radio (late of 50,000-watt blowtorch CFMJ-AM) that a trusted "source close to the Fitzgerald investigation" says the independent prosecutor is looking into former CIA Director George Tenet's role in pre-9/11 put options placed on American Airlines.

      Previous editions of Cloak & Dagger reported that the special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald has taken his investigation beyond who named Valerie Plame as a CIA agent into who frauded up claims that Saddam Hussien was seeking yellowcake uranium and, ultimately, the 9/11 scam.

      C&D correspondent Tom Heneghen reported on the July 17 show that Fitzgerald is looking into insider trading on airline stocks before 9/11. Heneghen reports that over the three trading days before 9/11 on the Chicago Board of Options 4,516 put options (bets the price would tank) were placed on American Airlines stock vs only 748 call options (bets the price would go up).

      According to C&D, Fitzgerald is investigating Tenet's role in connection to Buzzy Krongard, a former No. 3 at the CIA, and that man's relation to the 2,157 airline options placed through Morgan Stanley/Dean Witter, located on 22 floors of the WTC.
      ============
      Texas money laundering operation involving Hunts
      Philippines
      V.K. Durham trust
      Beverly Enterprises and Stephens, Inc.--45 nursing home associates--Mena, Ark.
      bogus gold cert.
      Brady Bond fraud
      Wachovia Bank
      assassinations--William Doonesbury and ____ ?
      offshoot of Muslim Brotherhood
      financial and operational terrorist fraud
      leaker to Judith Miller
      Bolton cables and intercepts with Uzbekistan
      hedge fund in London involving two "suicides" in NY
      James Warren at Chicago Trib is obstructing justice
      Chicago Mercantile
      Roger Morris, NSC--Air Force One signal of Bush and Cheney talking about Valerie Plame
      Leo Wanta letter to Dick Cheney about Philippine money --linked to Wachovia Bank
      Marc Rich
      Russian Mafiya
      Arrest of "E.P" in London, money laundered through Denmark
      If Bush fires Patrick Fitzgerald, it will set P.F. free to talk.
      white-skinned Moslems in Texas
      Arrests in London are the same as what went on in NY after 9/11 to shut up people who knew too much
      Subway bombs were underneath the trains and could not have been planted by the youths they arrested.
      Private company, mock drill, piggy-backed with actual bombing.
      P-2 and Calipari, who was assassinated in Iraq.
      Niger's embassy broken into and papers stolen
      Bush is desperate to fire Fitz., but can't.  Indictments will open up the whole money laundering network.
      Throughout the tape, there has been no mention of any sources for the information--where any leaks are coming from other than documents submitted by Tom Heneghen.

      =======
      http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/sts/bmartin/dissent/documents/health/beverly_arkansas.html

      A Rose Law Firm Deal, Revisited
      The Wall Street Journal PAGE A20 - - - 03/15/1994
      Jonathan Roos
      (Copyright (c) 1994, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.)

      The following is reprinted with permission from the Des Moines Register of June 13, 1993. A related editorial appears nearby {see related editorial: "Review & Outlook (Editorial): Who Was Webster Hubbell? -- I" -- WSJ March 15, 1994}.

      When Hillary Rodham Clinton complained in a recent speech about profiteering in the health care industry, she could have found a ready example in the role one of her former Arkansas law partners played in an Iowa nursing-homes deal that made millions for the deal makers.

      William H. Kennedy III, a partner in the Rose Law Firm of Little Rock and now associate counsel to President Clinton, shepherded the deal for Beverly Enterprises, a giant nursing-home company that paired up with a Texas banker to sell its Iowa and Arkansas nursing homes.

      Forty-one Iowa homes were acquired four years ago by a nonprofit corporation, now known as Care Initiatives, that was effectively controlled by the banker, Bruce Whitehead. The deal was financed by $86 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds.

      Whitehead and the bond underwriters took up-front profits exceeding $15 million.

      Beverly, which needed cash to reduce its crippling debt, made about $10 million.

      "Kennedy was involved in the whole thing, period. He was the point man for Beverly," says Frank Pechacek, a Council Bluffs lawyer who investigated the deal for county assessors. The assessors were contesting Care Initiatives' claim to property tax exemptions for its nursing homes in about 30 counties.

      Kennedy could not be reached for comment.

      Other Rose Law Firm partners who now work in the Clinton administration may have been involved, too. Webster Hubbell, who holds the No. 3 slot in the Justice Department {Mr. Hubbell resigned yesterday}, listed Beverly Enterprises among his 26 Rose Law Firm clients.

      Vincent Foster Jr., deputy counsel to the president, represented Stephens Inc., a Little Rock investment-banking firm that owns 10% of Beverly's stock. Beverly hired Stephens to find a buyer for many of its nursing homes. The search led Beverly to Whitehead.

      "There was absolutely no way that these people didn't know what was going on," said Roy Drew, a former Stephens broker and an independent investment adviser whose criticism of a similar nursing-home transaction in Arkansas involving Beverly, Whitehead and a nonprofit corporation helped touch off a political furor that scuttled the deal.

      No one is saying that nursing-home company executives, lawyers, bankers or others involved in the Iowa homes' sale acted illegally. In fact, great care was taken to dot the i's and cross the t's on the contracts.

      But critics of the transaction have complained of profiteering.

      Said Drew: " Rose Law Firm made it legal, but it didn't have anything to do with what was right or fair to taxpayers or people in nursing homes. It had only to do with getting Beverly and Stephens Inc. off the hook."

      Last month, the Iowa Supreme Court upheld District Judge Gene Needles's denial of Care Initiatives' request for an exemption from paying property taxes on its nursing homes. Total taxes on the homes exceed $800,000 a year.

      Needles and the Supreme Court sided with county assessors in concluding that Care Initiatives did not meet the tests of a charitable institution.

      Said Needles, "Care Initiatives is a `shell' nonprofit corporation used by Bruce H. Whitehead and the bond underwriters to obtain the financing necessary to enable them to make millions of dollars of excessive profits."

      Whitehead and lawyers for Care Initiatives contended that the profits were reasonable, given the size of the deal and the financial risk involved.

      Court records and transcripts of testimony by Whitehead and his lawyer show that Kennedy looked after the interests of Beverly Enterprises. He prepared the financial documents and negotiated with Whitehead and other parties to the Iowa and Arkansas nursing-home deals.

      Whitehead testified that the nation's largest operator of nursing homes "was having severe financial difficulty. They needed to raise cash desperately because of the financial problems they were having."

      In 1988, Beverly sought to sell off its nursing homes in Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska and Arkansas. But finding a buyer and conventional financing for the sale would be difficult.

      Whitehead, the Texas banker, was interested in only the Iowa and Arkansas homes. A proposed sale agreement prepared by Kennedy called for a company controlled by Whitehead to buy Beverly's Iowa and Arkansas homes for about $115 million.

      The Iowa portion of the deal was sealed in the summer of 1989. Whitehead's Ventana Investments bought the Iowa nursing homes for $57 million as part of a two-step transaction that left Whitehead a hefty profit. The homes were then sold to nonprofit Care Initiatives (known then as Mercy Health Initiatives) for $63.5 million.

      The money was borrowed through the sale of $86 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds that the Iowa Finance Authority, a public agency, agreed to issue.

      The Iowa Finance Authority served as a conduit; no state money was loaned. Nursing-home revenue is used to repay investors who purchased the bonds.

      The Iowa transaction caused no ripples. At a public hearing, Whitehead assured the Iowa Finance Authority board that the Beverly employees in Iowa would keep their jobs. At a follow-up meeting conducted over the telephone, the board voted unanimously to authorize the bond sale.

      "There was the belief that there was a danger that some of those {nursing homes} could have closed," said Ted Chapler, executive director of the Iowa Finance Authority.

      The lost jobs would have dealt an economic blow to the rural communities where the nursing homes are located, said Chapler, who was the finance authority's general counsel when the bond sale was approved by the group's board and Gov. Terry Branstad.

      Care Initiatives employs 2,800 workers in Iowa. Its nursing homes have 3,200 residents.

      The sale of 36 nursing homes in Arkansas was to be financed in the same way, using $81 million in revenue bonds and another nonprofit corporation that had been set up for Whitehead. He stood to gain $4 million from the transaction. But during the fall of 1989 the deal unraveled.

      The Arkansas Development Finance Authority, which had become an important economic tool for then-Gov. Bill Clinton, initially supported the proposed bond sale but backed away as criticism of the deal mounted. When Bob Nash, president of the Arkansas agency, recommended rejecting the deal, Whitehead challenged him to a fist fight, according to Little Rock news accounts. Whitehead later testified in the Iowa property-tax case that he lost over $2 million in Arkansas.

      Clinton, who had the last word in killing the deal, was brushed by the controversy but suffered no lasting political damage. He was re-elected governor in 1990.

      There have been changes in Iowa since the deal. Last year, Care Initiatives severed its ties with Whitehead and his nursing-home management company. Duncan Graham, the firm's president, says Care Initiatives now is managing the nursing homes itself.

      He says the move should strengthen the firm's new bid for property-tax exemptions for its Iowa homes. That's expected to touch off another court battle.

      Copyright (c) 1999 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.






      End the oppression of cannabis and its consumers. Self defense is always correct, and it is never illegal.  b_jb2001


      Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

    • mark urban
      The following is from Archibald Cox s obituary at Washingtonpost.com That fuck Bork fired Special Prosecutor Cox. That is why Bork never made the Supreme
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 3, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        The following is from Archibald Cox's obituary at Washingtonpost.com

        That fuck Bork fired Special Prosecutor Cox.

        That is why Bork never made the Supreme Court.

        xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


        "...An angry Nixon demanded Cox's firing. But Attorney General
        Elliot Richardson, who had recruited Cox as the Watergate special
        prosecutor, refused to carry out the president's order. He resigned,
        as did his deputy, William D. Ruckelshaus. Robert H. Bork, who as
        solicitor general was the third-ranking officer of the Justice
        Department, dismissed Cox.

        Almost overnight, from Capitol Hill and in the national media, came
        the sounds of protest and dismay. Sen. Barry M. Goldwater (Ariz.),
        one of the most influential Republicans in Congress, declared that
        Nixon's credibility "has reached an all-time low from which he may
        not be able to recover."

        In the House of Representatives, members introduced 22 bills calling
        for the impeachment of the president or an investigation into
        impeachment proceedings. More than a million telegrams demanding
        impeachment poured into congressional offices.

        Newspaper editorial writers and columnists made somber references to
        an "attempted coup d'etat." Cox appeared on the cover of Newsweek
        magazine, wearing his trademark bow tie, neatly knotted as always.
        Time had photos of Cox and the president facing each other over the
        caption, "Nixon on the Brink."

        The firing of Cox, on Oct. 20, 1973, came at a time of high
        turbulence and political unrest. The Watergate scandal was
        increasingly engulfing the Nixon presidency. A summer of televised
        hearings on Capitol Hill had produced a steady flow of testimony
        suggesting burglary, lies, duplicity and criminality at the highest
        levels..."

        --- In cia-drugs@yahoogroups.com, "E Bryant Holman" <bryanth@p...>
        wrote:
        > No he can't. Why didn't Clinton just fire Starr? No one can fire a
        special prosecutor. He was hired just for that reason.
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: james Karl
        > To: cia-drugs@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 11:36 AM
        > Subject: Re: [cia-drugs] Tom Heneghen report on July 17
        >
        >
        > Bullshit. Bush as President can fire any US Attorney.
        >
        > Linda Minor <lminor@v...> wrote:
        > This show aired before the disclosure about the actual
        indictments reported by Flocco.
        > =======
        >
        > http://www.total911.info/2005/07/tenet-under-investigation-for-
        pre-911.html
        > Tom Heneghen reports to Cloak & Dagger Internet Radio (late of
        50,000-watt blowtorch CFMJ-AM) that a trusted "source close to the
        Fitzgerald investigation" says the independent prosecutor is looking
        into former CIA Director George Tenet's role in pre-9/11 put options
        placed on American Airlines.
        >
        > Previous editions of Cloak & Dagger reported that the special
        prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald has taken his investigation beyond who
        named Valerie Plame as a CIA agent into who frauded up claims that
        Saddam Hussien was seeking yellowcake uranium and, ultimately, the
        9/11 scam.
        >
        > C&D correspondent Tom Heneghen reported on the July 17 show
        that Fitzgerald is looking into insider trading on airline stocks
        before 9/11. Heneghen reports that over the three trading days
        before 9/11 on the Chicago Board of Options 4,516 put options (bets
        the price would tank) were placed on American Airlines stock vs only
        748 call options (bets the price would go up).
        >
        > According to C&D, Fitzgerald is investigating Tenet's role in
        connection to Buzzy Krongard, a former No. 3 at the CIA, and that
        man's relation to the 2,157 airline options placed through Morgan
        Stanley/Dean Witter, located on 22 floors of the WTC.
        > ============
        > Texas money laundering operation involving Hunts
        > Philippines
        > V.K. Durham trust
        > Beverly Enterprises and Stephens, Inc.--45 nursing home
        associates--Mena, Ark.
        > bogus gold cert.
        > Brady Bond fraud
        > Wachovia Bank
        > assassinations--William Doonesbury and ____ ?
        > offshoot of Muslim Brotherhood
        > financial and operational terrorist fraud
        > leaker to Judith Miller
        > Bolton cables and intercepts with Uzbekistan
        > hedge fund in London involving two "suicides" in NY
        > James Warren at Chicago Trib is obstructing justice
        > Chicago Mercantile
        > Roger Morris, NSC--Air Force One signal of Bush and Cheney
        talking about Valerie Plame
        > Leo Wanta letter to Dick Cheney about Philippine money --
        linked to Wachovia Bank
        > Marc Rich
        > Russian Mafiya
        > Arrest of "E.P" in London, money laundered through Denmark
        > If Bush fires Patrick Fitzgerald, it will set P.F. free to
        talk.
        > white-skinned Moslems in Texas
        > Arrests in London are the same as what went on in NY after
        9/11 to shut up people who knew too much
        > Subway bombs were underneath the trains and could not have
        been planted by the youths they arrested.
        > Private company, mock drill, piggy-backed with actual bombing.
        > P-2 and Calipari, who was assassinated in Iraq.
        > Niger's embassy broken into and papers stolen
        > Bush is desperate to fire Fitz., but can't. Indictments will
        open up the whole money laundering network.
        > Throughout the tape, there has been no mention of any sources
        for the information--where any leaks are coming from other than
        documents submitted by Tom Heneghen.
        >
        > =======
        >
        http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/sts/bmartin/dissent/documents/health/bever
        ly_arkansas.html
        >
        > A Rose Law Firm Deal, Revisited
        > The Wall Street Journal PAGE A20 - - - 03/15/1994
        > Jonathan Roos
        > (Copyright (c) 1994, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.)
        >
        > The following is reprinted with permission from the Des Moines
        Register of June 13, 1993. A related editorial appears nearby {see
        related editorial: "Review & Outlook (Editorial): Who Was Webster
        Hubbell? -- I" -- WSJ March 15, 1994}.
        >
        > When Hillary Rodham Clinton complained in a recent speech
        about profiteering in the health care industry, she could have found
        a ready example in the role one of her former Arkansas law partners
        played in an Iowa nursing-homes deal that made millions for the deal
        makers.
        >
        > William H. Kennedy III, a partner in the Rose Law Firm of
        Little Rock and now associate counsel to President Clinton,
        shepherded the deal for Beverly Enterprises, a giant nursing-home
        company that paired up with a Texas banker to sell its Iowa and
        Arkansas nursing homes.
        >
        > Forty-one Iowa homes were acquired four years ago by a
        nonprofit corporation, now known as Care Initiatives, that was
        effectively controlled by the banker, Bruce Whitehead. The deal was
        financed by $86 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds.
        >
        > Whitehead and the bond underwriters took up-front profits
        exceeding $15 million.
        >
        > Beverly, which needed cash to reduce its crippling debt, made
        about $10 million.
        >
        > "Kennedy was involved in the whole thing, period. He was the
        point man for Beverly," says Frank Pechacek, a Council Bluffs lawyer
        who investigated the deal for county assessors. The assessors were
        contesting Care Initiatives' claim to property tax exemptions for
        its nursing homes in about 30 counties.
        >
        > Kennedy could not be reached for comment.
        >
        > Other Rose Law Firm partners who now work in the Clinton
        administration may have been involved, too. Webster Hubbell, who
        holds the No. 3 slot in the Justice Department {Mr. Hubbell resigned
        yesterday}, listed Beverly Enterprises among his 26 Rose Law Firm
        clients.
        >
        > Vincent Foster Jr., deputy counsel to the president,
        represented Stephens Inc., a Little Rock investment-banking firm
        that owns 10% of Beverly's stock. Beverly hired Stephens to find a
        buyer for many of its nursing homes. The search led Beverly to
        Whitehead.
        >
        > "There was absolutely no way that these people didn't know
        what was going on," said Roy Drew, a former Stephens broker and an
        independent investment adviser whose criticism of a similar nursing-
        home transaction in Arkansas involving Beverly, Whitehead and a
        nonprofit corporation helped touch off a political furor that
        scuttled the deal.
        >
        > No one is saying that nursing-home company executives,
        lawyers, bankers or others involved in the Iowa homes' sale acted
        illegally. In fact, great care was taken to dot the i's and cross
        the t's on the contracts.
        >
        > But critics of the transaction have complained of profiteering.
        >
        > Said Drew: " Rose Law Firm made it legal, but it didn't have
        anything to do with what was right or fair to taxpayers or people in
        nursing homes. It had only to do with getting Beverly and Stephens
        Inc. off the hook."
        >
        > Last month, the Iowa Supreme Court upheld District Judge Gene
        Needles's denial of Care Initiatives' request for an exemption from
        paying property taxes on its nursing homes. Total taxes on the homes
        exceed $800,000 a year.
        >
        > Needles and the Supreme Court sided with county assessors in
        concluding that Care Initiatives did not meet the tests of a
        charitable institution.
        >
        > Said Needles, "Care Initiatives is a `shell' nonprofit
        corporation used by Bruce H. Whitehead and the bond underwriters to
        obtain the financing necessary to enable them to make millions of
        dollars of excessive profits."
        >
        > Whitehead and lawyers for Care Initiatives contended that the
        profits were reasonable, given the size of the deal and the
        financial risk involved.
        >
        > Court records and transcripts of testimony by Whitehead and
        his lawyer show that Kennedy looked after the interests of Beverly
        Enterprises. He prepared the financial documents and negotiated with
        Whitehead and other parties to the Iowa and Arkansas nursing-home
        deals.
        >
        > Whitehead testified that the nation's largest operator of
        nursing homes "was having severe financial difficulty. They needed
        to raise cash desperately because of the financial problems they
        were having."
        >
        > In 1988, Beverly sought to sell off its nursing homes in Iowa,
        South Dakota, Nebraska and Arkansas. But finding a buyer and
        conventional financing for the sale would be difficult.
        >
        > Whitehead, the Texas banker, was interested in only the Iowa
        and Arkansas homes. A proposed sale agreement prepared by Kennedy
        called for a company controlled by Whitehead to buy Beverly's Iowa
        and Arkansas homes for about $115 million.
        >
        > The Iowa portion of the deal was sealed in the summer of 1989.
        Whitehead's Ventana Investments bought the Iowa nursing homes for
        $57 million as part of a two-step transaction that left Whitehead a
        hefty profit. The homes were then sold to nonprofit Care Initiatives
        (known then as Mercy Health Initiatives) for $63.5 million.
        >
        > The money was borrowed through the sale of $86 million in tax-
        exempt revenue bonds that the Iowa Finance Authority, a public
        agency, agreed to issue.
        >
        > The Iowa Finance Authority served as a conduit; no state money
        was loaned. Nursing-home revenue is used to repay investors who
        purchased the bonds.
        >
        > The Iowa transaction caused no ripples. At a public hearing,
        Whitehead assured the Iowa Finance Authority board that the Beverly
        employees in Iowa would keep their jobs. At a follow-up meeting
        conducted over the telephone, the board voted unanimously to
        authorize the bond sale.
        >
        > "There was the belief that there was a danger that some of
        those {nursing homes} could have closed," said Ted Chapler,
        executive director of the Iowa Finance Authority.
        >
        > The lost jobs would have dealt an economic blow to the rural
        communities where the nursing homes are located, said Chapler, who
        was the finance authority's general counsel when the bond sale was
        approved by the group's board and Gov. Terry Branstad.
        >
        > Care Initiatives employs 2,800 workers in Iowa. Its nursing
        homes have 3,200 residents.
        >
        > The sale of 36 nursing homes in Arkansas was to be financed in
        the same way, using $81 million in revenue bonds and another
        nonprofit corporation that had been set up for Whitehead. He stood
        to gain $4 million from the transaction. But during the fall of 1989
        the deal unraveled.
        >
        > The Arkansas Development Finance Authority, which had become
        an important economic tool for then-Gov. Bill Clinton, initially
        supported the proposed bond sale but backed away as criticism of the
        deal mounted. When Bob Nash, president of the Arkansas agency,
        recommended rejecting the deal, Whitehead challenged him to a fist
        fight, according to Little Rock news accounts. Whitehead later
        testified in the Iowa property-tax case that he lost over $2 million
        in Arkansas.
        >
        > Clinton, who had the last word in killing the deal, was
        brushed by the controversy but suffered no lasting political damage.
        He was re-elected governor in 1990.
        >
        > There have been changes in Iowa since the deal. Last year,
        Care Initiatives severed its ties with Whitehead and his nursing-
        home management company. Duncan Graham, the firm's president, says
        Care Initiatives now is managing the nursing homes itself.
        >
        > He says the move should strengthen the firm's new bid for
        property-tax exemptions for its Iowa homes. That's expected to touch
        off another court battle.
        >
        > Copyright (c) 1999 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights
        Reserved.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > End the oppression of cannabis and its consumers. Self defense
        is always correct, and it is never illegal. b_jb2001
        >
        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----------
        > Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
        >
        > Complete archives at http://www.sitbot.net/
        >
        > Please let us stay on topic and be civil.
        >
        > OM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        > a.. Visit your group "cia-drugs" on the web.
        >
        > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > cia-drugs-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
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        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----------
      • Vigilius Haufniensis
        STARR was an independent council. the law creating those does not exist anymore. starr was illegally representing the same chinese intel front corporation he
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 3, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          STARR was an independent council.  the law creating those does not exist anymore.
          starr was illegally representing the same chinese intel front corporation he was ostensibly investigating clinton over, btw.
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 9:08 PM
          Subject: Re: [cia-drugs] Tom Heneghen report on July 17

          No he can't. Why didn't Clinton just fire Starr? No one can fire a special prosecutor. He was hired just for that reason.
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 11:36 AM
          Subject: Re: [cia-drugs] Tom Heneghen report on July 17

          Bullshit.  Bush as President can fire any US Attorney.

          Linda Minor <lminor@...> wrote:
          This show aired before the disclosure about the actual indictments reported by Flocco.
          =======

          http://www.total911.info/2005/07/tenet-under-investigation-for-pre-911.html
          Tom Heneghen reports to Cloak & Dagger Internet Radio (late of 50,000-watt blowtorch CFMJ-AM) that a trusted "source close to the Fitzgerald investigation" says the independent prosecutor is looking into former CIA Director George Tenet's role in pre-9/11 put options placed on American Airlines.

          Previous editions of Cloak & Dagger reported that the special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald has taken his investigation beyond who named Valerie Plame as a CIA agent into who frauded up claims that Saddam Hussien was seeking yellowcake uranium and, ultimately, the 9/11 scam.

          C&D correspondent Tom Heneghen reported on the July 17 show that Fitzgerald is looking into insider trading on airline stocks before 9/11. Heneghen reports that over the three trading days before 9/11 on the Chicago Board of Options 4,516 put options (bets the price would tank) were placed on American Airlines stock vs only 748 call options (bets the price would go up).

          According to C&D, Fitzgerald is investigating Tenet's role in connection to Buzzy Krongard, a former No. 3 at the CIA, and that man's relation to the 2,157 airline options placed through Morgan Stanley/Dean Witter, located on 22 floors of the WTC.
          ============
          Texas money laundering operation involving Hunts
          Philippines
          V.K. Durham trust
          Beverly Enterprises and Stephens, Inc.--45 nursing home associates--Mena, Ark.
          bogus gold cert.
          Brady Bond fraud
          Wachovia Bank
          assassinations--William Doonesbury and ____ ?
          offshoot of Muslim Brotherhood
          financial and operational terrorist fraud
          leaker to Judith Miller
          Bolton cables and intercepts with Uzbekistan
          hedge fund in London involving two "suicides" in NY
          James Warren at Chicago Trib is obstructing justice
          Chicago Mercantile
          Roger Morris, NSC--Air Force One signal of Bush and Cheney talking about Valerie Plame
          Leo Wanta letter to Dick Cheney about Philippine money --linked to Wachovia Bank
          Marc Rich
          Russian Mafiya
          Arrest of "E.P" in London, money laundered through Denmark
          If Bush fires Patrick Fitzgerald, it will set P.F. free to talk.
          white-skinned Moslems in Texas
          Arrests in London are the same as what went on in NY after 9/11 to shut up people who knew too much
          Subway bombs were underneath the trains and could not have been planted by the youths they arrested.
          Private company, mock drill, piggy-backed with actual bombing.
          P-2 and Calipari, who was assassinated in Iraq.
          Niger's embassy broken into and papers stolen
          Bush is desperate to fire Fitz., but can't.  Indictments will open up the whole money laundering network.
          Throughout the tape, there has been no mention of any sources for the information--where any leaks are coming from other than documents submitted by Tom Heneghen.

          =======
          http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/sts/bmartin/dissent/documents/health/beverly_arkansas.html

          A Rose Law Firm Deal, Revisited
          The Wall Street Journal PAGE A20 - - - 03/15/1994
          Jonathan Roos
          (Copyright (c) 1994, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.)

          The following is reprinted with permission from the Des Moines Register of June 13, 1993. A related editorial appears nearby {see related editorial: "Review & Outlook (Editorial): Who Was Webster Hubbell? -- I" -- WSJ March 15, 1994}.

          When Hillary Rodham Clinton complained in a recent speech about profiteering in the health care industry, she could have found a ready example in the role one of her former Arkansas law partners played in an Iowa nursing-homes deal that made millions for the deal makers.

          William H. Kennedy III, a partner in the Rose Law Firm of Little Rock and now associate counsel to President Clinton, shepherded the deal for Beverly Enterprises, a giant nursing-home company that paired up with a Texas banker to sell its Iowa and Arkansas nursing homes.

          Forty-one Iowa homes were acquired four years ago by a nonprofit corporation, now known as Care Initiatives, that was effectively controlled by the banker, Bruce Whitehead. The deal was financed by $86 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds.

          Whitehead and the bond underwriters took up-front profits exceeding $15 million.

          Beverly, which needed cash to reduce its crippling debt, made about $10 million.

          "Kennedy was involved in the whole thing, period. He was the point man for Beverly," says Frank Pechacek, a Council Bluffs lawyer who investigated the deal for county assessors. The assessors were contesting Care Initiatives' claim to property tax exemptions for its nursing homes in about 30 counties.

          Kennedy could not be reached for comment.

          Other Rose Law Firm partners who now work in the Clinton administration may have been involved, too. Webster Hubbell, who holds the No. 3 slot in the Justice Department {Mr. Hubbell resigned yesterday}, listed Beverly Enterprises among his 26 Rose Law Firm clients.

          Vincent Foster Jr., deputy counsel to the president, represented Stephens Inc., a Little Rock investment-banking firm that owns 10% of Beverly's stock. Beverly hired Stephens to find a buyer for many of its nursing homes. The search led Beverly to Whitehead.

          "There was absolutely no way that these people didn't know what was going on," said Roy Drew, a former Stephens broker and an independent investment adviser whose criticism of a similar nursing-home transaction in Arkansas involving Beverly, Whitehead and a nonprofit corporation helped touch off a political furor that scuttled the deal.

          No one is saying that nursing-home company executives, lawyers, bankers or others involved in the Iowa homes' sale acted illegally. In fact, great care was taken to dot the i's and cross the t's on the contracts.

          But critics of the transaction have complained of profiteering.

          Said Drew: " Rose Law Firm made it legal, but it didn't have anything to do with what was right or fair to taxpayers or people in nursing homes. It had only to do with getting Beverly and Stephens Inc. off the hook."

          Last month, the Iowa Supreme Court upheld District Judge Gene Needles's denial of Care Initiatives' request for an exemption from paying property taxes on its nursing homes. Total taxes on the homes exceed $800,000 a year.

          Needles and the Supreme Court sided with county assessors in concluding that Care Initiatives did not meet the tests of a charitable institution.

          Said Needles, "Care Initiatives is a `shell' nonprofit corporation used by Bruce H. Whitehead and the bond underwriters to obtain the financing necessary to enable them to make millions of dollars of excessive profits."

          Whitehead and lawyers for Care Initiatives contended that the profits were reasonable, given the size of the deal and the financial risk involved.

          Court records and transcripts of testimony by Whitehead and his lawyer show that Kennedy looked after the interests of Beverly Enterprises. He prepared the financial documents and negotiated with Whitehead and other parties to the Iowa and Arkansas nursing-home deals.

          Whitehead testified that the nation's largest operator of nursing homes "was having severe financial difficulty. They needed to raise cash desperately because of the financial problems they were having."

          In 1988, Beverly sought to sell off its nursing homes in Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska and Arkansas. But finding a buyer and conventional financing for the sale would be difficult.

          Whitehead, the Texas banker, was interested in only the Iowa and Arkansas homes. A proposed sale agreement prepared by Kennedy called for a company controlled by Whitehead to buy Beverly's Iowa and Arkansas homes for about $115 million.

          The Iowa portion of the deal was sealed in the summer of 1989. Whitehead's Ventana Investments bought the Iowa nursing homes for $57 million as part of a two-step transaction that left Whitehead a hefty profit. The homes were then sold to nonprofit Care Initiatives (known then as Mercy Health Initiatives) for $63.5 million.

          The money was borrowed through the sale of $86 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds that the Iowa Finance Authority, a public agency, agreed to issue.

          The Iowa Finance Authority served as a conduit; no state money was loaned. Nursing-home revenue is used to repay investors who purchased the bonds.

          The Iowa transaction caused no ripples. At a public hearing, Whitehead assured the Iowa Finance Authority board that the Beverly employees in Iowa would keep their jobs. At a follow-up meeting conducted over the telephone, the board voted unanimously to authorize the bond sale.

          "There was the belief that there was a danger that some of those {nursing homes} could have closed," said Ted Chapler, executive director of the Iowa Finance Authority.

          The lost jobs would have dealt an economic blow to the rural communities where the nursing homes are located, said Chapler, who was the finance authority's general counsel when the bond sale was approved by the group's board and Gov. Terry Branstad.

          Care Initiatives employs 2,800 workers in Iowa. Its nursing homes have 3,200 residents.

          The sale of 36 nursing homes in Arkansas was to be financed in the same way, using $81 million in revenue bonds and another nonprofit corporation that had been set up for Whitehead. He stood to gain $4 million from the transaction. But during the fall of 1989 the deal unraveled.

          The Arkansas Development Finance Authority, which had become an important economic tool for then-Gov. Bill Clinton, initially supported the proposed bond sale but backed away as criticism of the deal mounted. When Bob Nash, president of the Arkansas agency, recommended rejecting the deal, Whitehead challenged him to a fist fight, according to Little Rock news accounts. Whitehead later testified in the Iowa property-tax case that he lost over $2 million in Arkansas.

          Clinton, who had the last word in killing the deal, was brushed by the controversy but suffered no lasting political damage. He was re-elected governor in 1990.

          There have been changes in Iowa since the deal. Last year, Care Initiatives severed its ties with Whitehead and his nursing-home management company. Duncan Graham, the firm's president, says Care Initiatives now is managing the nursing homes itself.

          He says the move should strengthen the firm's new bid for property-tax exemptions for its Iowa homes. That's expected to touch off another court battle.

          Copyright (c) 1999 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.






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