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USB Chordite for Christmas

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  • John McKown
    Atmel s at90usbkey development board for their AVR+USB chip family costs $33 at Digi-Key. Right now they ve got 105 in stock. It programs right through its
    Message 1 of 29 , Dec 7, 2007
      Atmel's "at90usbkey" development board for their AVR+USB chip family costs $33 at Digi-Key.  Right now they've got 105 in stock.  It programs right through its USB port using Atmel's free FLIP 3

      About a year ago I started to use their accompanying demo software to make a USB chordite but gave it up because they didn't have their source converted over to the free WinAVR (i.e., avr-gcc on Windows) compiler.  It was just too much hassle to convert it myself.  

      But now they've done that for me. They've now got a mouse demo   that compiles on WinAVR and runs on the at90usbkey board, which has the at90usb1287 chip.  They've also got a keyboard demo   that runs on the not-so-cheap STK526 board ($211, two available) which has the smaller, cheaper at90usb162 chip which is really more suitable than the '1287 for keyboards.

      So now the project looks as follows.

      (1) Combine the 2 demos to make a mouse+keyboard demo that runs on the 'key board. This is a USB compound device with 2 interfaces.
      (2) Replace Atmel's keyboard part (which merely prints a canned message when you punch the joystick button) with Chordite keyboard code.
      (3) Replace the mouse demo part with the mouse Chordite part.
      (4) Move the code back to the '162 chip and lay out a little board for it.
      (5) Use emachineshop for the physical design

      Voila, USB Chordite (or, for that matter, other chording keyboards) for the masses.

      At the moment I've finished steps 1 and 2 and I'm starting on 3, which should be the easiest.  I know what I want for 4 and 5.  The beauty of all this is that Atmel has made it unnecessary to learn much about their USB implementation or even USB in general.  They just give you a nice little niche to plug your stuff into.

      Unfortunately the way I understand Atmel's license I can't publish the source code that results. I can only post a hex (i.e., executable) file.  The 0.1 version should be in the files section within a week or so.
    • John McKown
      As promised I ve posted a hex file that implements a usb chordite on the at90usbkey board. I haven t hooked my board up to a real handset yet so it s only been
      Message 2 of 29 , Dec 10, 2007
        As promised I've posted a hex file that implements a usb chordite on
        the at90usbkey board. I haven't hooked my board up to a real handset
        yet so it's only been tested with one-key chords but those seem to
        work fine for both mouse and keyboard. It uses port A. This code
        comes up as a mouse and you have to toggle into keyboard mode. I'll
        probably replace this code with a later version that uses port B and
        sleeps better.

        This is meant for (the amusement of) what you might call insanely
        early adopters who think it's fun to (a) buy the at90usbkey, (b)
        download the flex 3 programmer (c) use it to load the hex file into
        the '1287 on the board and (d) build their own devices (handset switch
        assemblies) and connect them to the board.
      • John McKown
        I ve replaced the hex file with one that uses port B because that s the port I ll use when I get around to making it sleep better.
        Message 3 of 29 , Dec 22, 2007
          I've replaced the hex file with one that uses port B because that's
          the port I'll use when I get around to making it sleep better.

          --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "John McKown" <john_3000@...> wrote:
          >
          > As promised I've posted a hex file that implements a usb chordite on
          > the at90usbkey board. I haven't hooked my board up to a real handset
          > yet so it's only been tested with one-key chords but those seem to
          > work fine for both mouse and keyboard. It uses port A. This code
          > comes up as a mouse and you have to toggle into keyboard mode. I'll
          > probably replace this code with a later version that uses port B and
          > sleeps better.
          >
          > This is meant for (the amusement of) what you might call insanely
          > early adopters who think it's fun to (a) buy the at90usbkey, (b)
          > download the flex 3 programmer (c) use it to load the hex file into
          > the '1287 on the board and (d) build their own devices (handset switch
          > assemblies) and connect them to the board.
          >
        • John McKown
          A new file chordite003.hex is now in place. Chordite002.hex didn t actually work. 003 has been a little better tested. I hooked it up to a real switch assembly
          Message 4 of 29 , Jan 1, 2008
            A new file chordite003.hex is now in place. Chordite002.hex didn't
            actually work.

            003 has been a little better tested. I hooked it up to a real switch
            assembly and worked out some timing issues. I may not be able to
            remain as ignorant of USB as I would prefer. Anyway 003 seems to work
            just fine. I'm using it to type this. It goes in and out of mouse
            mode properly. Modifiers work. No doubt I'll find some rough edges
            though and then on to 004.
          • John McKown
            Another day, another version. ver. 004 uses the board s LEDs to show caps lock, modifiers and mouse mode. It still doesn t sleep. The at90usbkey board also
            Message 5 of 29 , Jan 2, 2008
              Another day, another version. ver. 004 uses the board's LEDs to show
              caps lock, modifiers and mouse mode. It still doesn't sleep.

              The at90usbkey board also includes about 16MB of flash memory to
              support Atmel's USB mass storage device demo. It seems possible that
              demo code could be tweaked and folded into what I've got so far to
              yield a compound USB device with 3 interfaces; keyboard, mouse and
              mass storage device. What you would do with such a thing eludes me
              though.

              The chordite code fills less than 4% of the at90usb1287's cavernous
              program memory. There is plenty of room for lots of alternate
              chording schemes, optimized game controller modes and whatever.
            • Matthew Welland
              Does the chordite code fit on an attiny26 with the firmware only USB? http://www.obdev.at/products/avrusb/index.html Seems like it d be a nice solution.
              Message 6 of 29 , Jan 4, 2008
                Does the chordite code fit on an attiny26 with the firmware only USB?

                http://www.obdev.at/products/avrusb/index.html

                Seems like it'd be a nice solution. Bluetooth would be nicer still I
                suppose :-)

                Matt
                --

                On Wednesday 02 January 2008 02:48:16 pm John McKown wrote:
                > Another day, another version. ver. 004 uses the board's LEDs to show
                > caps lock, modifiers and mouse mode. It still doesn't sleep.
                >
                > The at90usbkey board also includes about 16MB of flash memory to
                > support Atmel's USB mass storage device demo. It seems possible that
                > demo code could be tweaked and folded into what I've got so far to
                > yield a compound USB device with 3 interfaces; keyboard, mouse and
                > mass storage device. What you would do with such a thing eludes me
                > though.
                >
                > The chordite code fills less than 4% of the at90usb1287's cavernous
                > program memory. There is plenty of room for lots of alternate
                > chording schemes, optimized game controller modes and whatever.
              • der_muri
                Hi John Thanks for sharing! I bought some AT90USB162´s several weeks ago with exactly what you did in mind. Except the part with the AT90USBKEY. I didn t
                Message 7 of 29 , Jan 5, 2008
                  Hi John
                  Thanks for sharing!

                  I bought some AT90USB162´s several weeks ago with exactly what you did
                  in mind. Except the part with the AT90USBKEY. I didn't write any code
                  so far, but I thought about the license issue with the atmel code,
                  because I'd want to share mine. With no real conclusion.
                  I thought of two possibilities.
                  1. Rewrite all Atmel stuff.
                  2. Only release your changes as diff files and the hex code. Which
                  would be enough for the hobbyists (and users don't need the code).

                  I'd go with 2. and start rewriting when time comes.

                  The features, I wanted to implement:
                  8 keys for chording
                  minijoystick (4 dir + push) for thumb (mouse mode alternate)
                  3 switches for setting the chording layout
                  3 LEDs to show caps lock, break and roll.. (or status or..)

                  At the university I go to, I got to etch my own circuit board and
                  already soldered the chip but I don't know if I got it right and I'm
                  again busy with revisions.

                  One thing I also wanted to share:
                  I'm taking the fibre glass mat and epoxy resin approach (with all it's
                  drawbacks like non-adjustable keys) - nice material. I can share
                  pictures if you want.

                  By the way - happy new year!

                  Marius

                  Ps: A SD card slot would be awesome :)
                • John McKown
                  Happy New Year to you too Marius. The at90usbkey board of course has a little joystick but so far I m not using it, mainly because it requires the board be
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jan 5, 2008
                    Happy New Year to you too Marius.   The at90usbkey board of course has a little joystick but so far I'm not using it, mainly because it requires the board be securely mounted somewhere and I haven't gotten that far yet. 

                    Re the code:  Dr. Stefan Salewski has given the world a GPL USB device stack for Atmel's USB chips.  I haven't tried yet to use it but I probably will as soon as I get my hardware design sent off to emachineshop.  BTW isn't it awesome how the Internet empowers us all to empower each other.  Thanks to the IETF and Larry & Sergey et al. we now live in a world where basically everyone gets a useful answer immediately to basically every question they encounter.  This fundamental change in productivity or I might as well say human existence seems to dwarf every other  invention and resource.  Except maybe fire.

                    Anyway, I'll look into the diff idea.  I don't think Atmel had in mind hobbiests when they wrote that license but today the line between hobbiest and manufacturer is hard to draw.  Yesterday I read somewhere that half of all businesses in the USA are operated out of homes. 

                    BTW what would you do with the SD card in a keyboard/mouse thingy?  I'm drawing a complete blank.  I guess if  you had a Bluetooth wearable keyboard with internal memory you could use it like a memory stick?  Seems like that would require the host to be pretty cooperative.
                  • John McKown
                    Wow, that would be sweet. I think the attiny26 is a hair too small. The ATtiny861 should be more than comfortably big enough. Thanks for the link!
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jan 5, 2008
                      Wow, that would be sweet. I think the attiny26 is a hair too small. The
                      ATtiny861 should be more than comfortably big enough. Thanks for the
                      link!

                      ===========================

                      --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Welland <matt@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Does the chordite code fit on an attiny26 with the firmware only USB?
                      >
                      > http://www.obdev.at/products/avrusb/index.html
                      >
                      > Seems like it'd be a nice solution. Bluetooth would be nicer still I
                      > suppose :-)
                      >
                      > Matt
                      > --
                    • John McKown
                      And yes please do send pictures. Do you want a hex file for the 162?
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jan 5, 2008
                        And yes please do send pictures. Do you want a hex file for the '162?
                      • der_muri
                        ... I looked into Stefan Salewski s description of his libs, too. But I didn t consider it, because they don t support the HID device class, which is the
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jan 6, 2008
                          --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "John McKown" <john_3000@...> wrote:

                          > Re the code: Dr. Stefan Salewski has given the world a GPL USB device
                          > stack <http://www.ssalewski.de/AT90USB_firmware.html.en> for Atmel's
                          > USB chips.

                          I looked into Stefan Salewski's description of his libs, too. But I
                          didn't consider it, because they don't support the HID device class,
                          which is the standard for MSWindows devices. You don't need to install
                          device drivers for HID class devices (neither on MSWindows nor other
                          operating systems). At a second glance - I don't know if his LibUSB
                          needs to be installed on the OS.

                          > BTW isn't it awesome
                          > how the Internet empowers us all to empower each other. Thanks to the
                          > IETF and Larry & Sergey et al. we now live in a world where basically
                          > everyone gets a useful answer immediately to basically every question
                          > they encounter. This fundamental change in productivity or I might as
                          > well say human existence seems to dwarf every other invention and
                          > resource. Except maybe fire.

                          Yes it's totally awesome.
                          But I'm not sure about that part containing 'useful'.
                          Fire and Towels.

                          > Anyway, I'll look into the diff idea. I don't think Atmel had in mind
                          > hobbiests when they wrote that license but today the line between
                          > hobbiest and manufacturer is hard to draw.

                          I really don't know, what Atmel tries to achieve with their somewhat
                          crippled license.

                          > BTW what would you do with the SD card in a keyboard/mouse thingy? I'm
                          > drawing a complete blank. I guess if you had a Bluetooth wearable
                          > keyboard with internal memory you could use it like a memory stick?

                          You could use it to do everything you use your memoy stick to. I
                          actually use a very small microSD card reader and a microSD card to
                          store files for my studies / university. (I don't know where I will
                          need them and if there is a connection to the internet.) And the
                          chordite is big enough to hold a normal SD card.
                          If I like to carry my chordite with me to avoid those dull qwertzies
                          it would be neat if I didn't have to remember where I left my
                          usb-stick. (Does that make sense grammatically?)

                          I'm not so convinced about Bluetooth. I can imagine that the needed
                          batteries make the chordite too heavy - but I could be wrong, of
                          course. It also makes me think about my experience with wireless mice.
                          They always run out of power at the wrong time. And what about
                          security? It's unlikely, but still possible that Ill Minded People
                          catch the key-signals and read your passwords. Encryption adds another
                          layer of complexity, but could help... maybe.
                          Don't get me wrong, wireless would be really nice, but it has to
                          outweight the drawbacks.

                          > Seems like that would require the host to be pretty cooperative.

                          I don't get it - what do you mean with cooperative?

                          > And yes please do send pictures. Do you want a hex file for the '162?

                          Images follow soon, but you'll have to upload them - I don't have the
                          permissions. I'd prefer the diffs.
                        • John McKown
                          I ve posted Marius photos.
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jan 6, 2008
                            I've posted Marius' photos.
                          • John McKown
                            I ve posted in the files section of this group a patch, m103k101_patch.zip, which converts Atmel s source code into the source for my current USB chordite
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                              I've posted in the files section of this group a patch, m103k101_patch.zip, which converts Atmel's source code into the source for my current USB chordite implementation.  You must get the Atmel code directly from Atmel.  I included instructions.

                              And what a pain in the ass it was.  The great thing about Linux is you can do anything.  Unfortunately you can never find out HOW to do anything.  The man pages truly suck and so does most of what you can google up about patch and diff.  I will stop there but I could go on.

                              For the benefit of those who prefer not to join Yahoo Inc. I'll post the patch on my website  as well.

                            • barry.odonovan
                              Hi all, i m new to this group so first off, kudos to John and others for work so far on this concept. i ve been playing about with ideas for this kind of thing
                              Message 14 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                Hi all,

                                i'm new to this group so first off, kudos to John and others for work
                                so far on this concept.

                                i've been playing about with ideas for this kind of thing for years
                                but Johns kingpin prototype is the first model i felt i could easily
                                fit the building of into my time-poor lifestyle.

                                i've built a first run of the hardware in a few hours over the weekend
                                and have begun practicing the chord sequences (amazing the difference
                                a piece of hardware makes to grasping - pun intended - the chording
                                idea) (can i post photo on this group?)

                                now i'm gonna do the electronics...

                                usb or bluetooth are the way for me since my wearable (n800) doesn't
                                have any other i/o's so i'm gonna start with the usb.

                                i'm about to order the at90usbkey demo board but before i do i just
                                want to confirm that there is no additional work needed to this before
                                i can program it up with john hex etc.
                                ie do i need any other hardware to interface this board with my pc
                                (windows or linux)???


                                tia,

                                barry
                              • John McKown
                                Hi Barry, The at90usbkey comes with a cable to connect to your host s usb port. Strictly speaking, you could buy a header (connector) to mount on the board
                                Message 15 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                  Hi Barry,

                                  The at90usbkey comes with a cable to connect to your host's usb port.

                                  Strictly speaking, you could buy a header (connector) to mount on the
                                  board because Atmel doesn't supply it, and then a ribbon cable with
                                  matching socket, to connect the keys . I think most people just
                                  solder individual wires directly to the tiny pads and then hot glue
                                  them. The board is designed for a 5 by 2 header with .127mm (.05 inch)
                                  pitch within the rows and .254 mm (.1 inch) between the rows. They're
                                  tough to find.


                                  ==========================
                                  --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "barry.odonovan" <fixit@...> wrote:
                                  >... do i need any other hardware to interface this board with my pc
                                  > (windows or linux)???
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > tia,
                                  >
                                  > barry
                                  >
                                • John McKown
                                  There s some discussion of the headers at avrfreaks.net
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                    There's some discussion of the headers at avrfreaks.net .   What I did is run short wires from the board to a standard .1in. pitch header.  That's what my switch assemblies expect since they're wired with ribbon cable.
                                  • Nick Marshall
                                    It is my understanding that the N800 does not support USB in host mode. Thus you can t connect this to it, by USB. As a Bluetooth keyboard sure. Nick ... -- é
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                      It is my understanding that the N800 does not support USB in host mode.
                                      Thus you can't connect this to it, by USB. As a Bluetooth keyboard sure.
                                       
                                      Nick
                                       
                                      On 1/8/08, barry.odonovan <fixit@...> wrote:

                                      Hi all,

                                      i'm new to this group so first off, kudos to John and others for work
                                      so far on this concept.

                                      i've been playing about with ideas for this kind of thing for years
                                      but Johns kingpin prototype is the first model i felt i could easily
                                      fit the building of into my time-poor lifestyle.

                                      i've built a first run of the hardware in a few hours over the weekend
                                      and have begun practicing the chord sequences (amazing the difference
                                      a piece of hardware makes to grasping - pun intended - the chording
                                      idea) (can i post photo on this group?)

                                      now i'm gonna do the electronics...

                                      usb or bluetooth are the way for me since my wearable (n800) doesn't
                                      have any other i/o's so i'm gonna start with the usb.

                                      i'm about to order the at90usbkey demo board but before i do i just
                                      want to confirm that there is no additional work needed to this before
                                      i can program it up with john hex etc.
                                      ie do i need any other hardware to interface this board with my pc
                                      (windows or linux)???

                                      tia,

                                      barry




                                      --
                                      И

                                      http://blog.nocturnaltechie.com
                                    • barry
                                      the N800 has an OTG usb controller in it so can do both host and slave. the big problem is the mini-B connector, even though this is 5 pin as per OTG spec, it
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                        the N800 has an OTG usb controller in it so can do both host and slave.
                                         
                                        the big problem is the mini-B connector, even though this is 5 pin as per OTG spec, it is intended for the client side, with a mini-A on the host side.
                                         
                                        however by hacking a mini-B plug (short pins 4&5) and using OS2008 the N800 will auto sense host mode.
                                         
                                        magic ;-)
                                         
                                        barry


                                        From: chordite@yahoogroups.com [mailto:chordite@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nick Marshall
                                        Sent: 08 January 2008 18:09
                                        To: chordite@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: Re: [chordite] Re: USB Chordite for Christmas

                                        It is my understanding that the N800 does not support USB in host mode.
                                        Thus you can't connect this to it, by USB. As a Bluetooth keyboard sure.
                                         
                                        Nick
                                         
                                        On 1/8/08, barry.odonovan <fixit@brokenstuff. org> wrote:

                                        Hi all,

                                        i'm new to this group so first off, kudos to John and others for work
                                        so far on this concept.

                                        i've been playing about with ideas for this kind of thing for years
                                        but Johns kingpin prototype is the first model i felt i could easily
                                        fit the building of into my time-poor lifestyle.

                                        i've built a first run of the hardware in a few hours over the weekend
                                        and have begun practicing the chord sequences (amazing the difference
                                        a piece of hardware makes to grasping - pun intended - the chording
                                        idea) (can i post photo on this group?)

                                        now i'm gonna do the electronics. ..

                                        usb or bluetooth are the way for me since my wearable (n800) doesn't
                                        have any other i/o's so i'm gonna start with the usb.

                                        i'm about to order the at90usbkey demo board but before i do i just
                                        want to confirm that there is no additional work needed to this before
                                        i can program it up with john hex etc.
                                        ie do i need any other hardware to interface this board with my pc
                                        (windows or linux)???

                                        tia,

                                        barry




                                        --
                                        И

                                        http://blog. nocturnaltechie. com


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                                      • John McKown
                                        FYI I just now looked and found the box my at90usbkey came in has not only the cable I ve been using, which on one end has a plug which fits into the board s
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                          FYI I just now looked and found the box my at90usbkey came in has not
                                          only the cable I've been using, which on one end has a plug which fits
                                          into the board's mini-ab receptacle and on the other end a big old
                                          plug that goes into the big old usb jack on my big old desktop
                                          machine, which I think is what's called "A."

                                          It also has a short "host adapter" with a little plug marked "a" on
                                          one end and an unmarked big old usb jack like on my big old desktop
                                          machine on the other.
                                        • der_muri
                                          ... Sorry to hear that, but thanks a lot anyway. OT: If you re dissatisfied enough to try something different to a Linux distro and would like complete and
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Jan 8, 2008
                                            --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "John McKown" <john_3000@...> wrote:
                                            > And what a pain in the ass it was. The great thing about Linux is you
                                            > can do anything. Unfortunately you can never find out HOW to do
                                            > anything. The man pages truly suck and so does most of what you can
                                            > google up about patch and diff. I will stop there but I could go on.

                                            Sorry to hear that, but thanks a lot anyway.

                                            OT:
                                            If you're dissatisfied enough to try something different to a Linux
                                            distro and would like complete and helpful documentation, I can
                                            recommend the BSDs (especially OpenBSD -> http://openbsd.org/).
                                          • John McKown
                                            Well, it obviously needed doing, once I learned it can be done. I wonder whether BSD has all the drivers I need for my antique hardware. One of these days I ll
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Jan 10, 2008
                                              Well, it obviously needed doing, once I learned it can be done.

                                              I wonder whether BSD has all the drivers I need for my antique
                                              hardware. One of these days I'll try it out, probably when I inherit
                                              my wife's more modern machine. I certainly do prefer their less
                                              restrictive license(s) over GPL. What I give away I do as public
                                              domain. Even though I wouldn't want one myself, I don't discriminate
                                              against people with jobs. :-)
                                              ===================================
                                              --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "der_muri" <der_muri@...> wrote:

                                              >
                                              > Sorry to hear that, but thanks a lot anyway.
                                              >
                                              > OT:
                                              > If you're dissatisfied enough to try something different to a Linux
                                              > distro and would like complete and helpful documentation, I can
                                              > recommend the BSDs (especially OpenBSD -> http://openbsd.org/).
                                              >
                                            • der_muri
                                              ... Hardware support should be no more a problem, as it is with any Linux distribution. Especially older hardware. Only thing lacking is 3D-acceleration
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Jan 10, 2008
                                                --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "John McKown" <john_3000@...> wrote:

                                                > I wonder whether BSD has all the drivers I need for my antique
                                                > hardware. One of these days I'll try it out, probably when I inherit

                                                Hardware support should be no more a problem, as it is with any Linux
                                                distribution. Especially older hardware. Only thing lacking is
                                                3D-acceleration (no-blobs) and "very new" hardware support. 2D is
                                                totally fine. Wireless is superior since some time and security is
                                                unmatched.

                                                > my wife's more modern machine. I certainly do prefer their less
                                                > restrictive license(s) over GPL. What I give away I do as public

                                                I can't say if I prefer the BSD/MIT/ISC license over the GPL, because
                                                I can't fully understand the GPL (especially the new one) - so in fact
                                                I like the others more :-)
                                                But now we're really drifting off..

                                                > domain. Even though I wouldn't want one myself, I don't discriminate
                                                > against people with jobs. :-)
                                              • Russ Nelson
                                                ... By the way, I m selling the BluePacket BPM20422 bluetooth keyboard module for $30 plus $5 shipping. It s not chording, but I have a driver for the N800
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Jan 11, 2008
                                                  barry.odonovan writes:
                                                  > usb or bluetooth are the way for me since my wearable (n800) doesn't
                                                  > have any other i/o's so i'm gonna start with the usb.

                                                  By the way, I'm selling the BluePacket BPM20422 bluetooth keyboard
                                                  module for $30 plus $5 shipping. It's not chording, but I have a
                                                  driver for the N800 which interprets seven of the regular old
                                                  keystrokes as chords, and sends keycodes to the machine.

                                                  All it requires in terms of external components is five power supply
                                                  filter caps, two resistors, an LED, a momentary pairing pushbutton, an
                                                  on-off switch, and a pair of batteries.

                                                  http://russnelson.com/bluetooth-keyboard-controller.html

                                                  --
                                                  --my blog is at http://blog.russnelson.com | Software that needs
                                                  Crynwr sells support for free software | PGPok | documentation is software
                                                  521 Pleasant Valley Rd. | +1 315-323-1241 | that needs repair.
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                                                • John McKown
                                                  Russ how does one acquire a data sheet for either the module or the chip? I don t even see a way. They re probably only available in Chinese. Comparing block
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Jan 12, 2008
                                                    Russ how does one acquire a data sheet for either the module or the
                                                    chip? I don't even see a way. They're probably only available in Chinese.

                                                    Comparing block diagrams in the "product briefs" for chip and module,
                                                    namely

                                                    http://www.broadcom.com/collateral/pb/2042-PB03-R.pdf
                                                    http://bluepacket.net/BluePacket/admin/file/BP20422-PB-003.pdf

                                                    it appears the module adds 8K of flash somehow. That's way more than
                                                    enough if one could get at it. I would imagine if you know AVR you
                                                    could pick up 8051 pretty quickly. Will they let us program this thing?

                                                    ===========================
                                                    --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, Russ Nelson <nelson@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > barry.odonovan writes:
                                                    > > usb or bluetooth are the way for me since my wearable (n800) doesn't
                                                    > > have any other i/o's so i'm gonna start with the usb.
                                                    >
                                                    > By the way, I'm selling the BluePacket BPM20422 bluetooth keyboard
                                                    > module for $30 plus $5 shipping. It's not chording, but I have a
                                                    > driver for the N800 which interprets seven of the regular old
                                                    > keystrokes as chords, and sends keycodes to the machine.
                                                    >
                                                    > All it requires in terms of external components is five power supply
                                                    > filter caps, two resistors, an LED, a momentary pairing pushbutton, an
                                                    > on-off switch, and a pair of batteries.
                                                    >
                                                    > http://russnelson.com/bluetooth-keyboard-controller.html ...
                                                  • Russ Nelson
                                                    ... I email it to purchasers. ... No, they stupidly won t. BOO HISS! Otherwise it would be perfect. -- --my blog is at http://blog.russnelson.com |
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Jan 23, 2008
                                                      John McKown writes:
                                                      > Russ how does one acquire a data sheet for either the module or the
                                                      > chip? I don't even see a way. They're probably only available in Chinese.

                                                      I email it to purchasers.

                                                      > it appears the module adds 8K of flash somehow. That's way more than
                                                      > enough if one could get at it. I would imagine if you know AVR you
                                                      > could pick up 8051 pretty quickly. Will they let us program this thing?

                                                      No, they stupidly won't. BOO HISS! Otherwise it would be perfect.

                                                      --
                                                      --my blog is at http://blog.russnelson.com | Software that needs
                                                      Crynwr sells support for free software | PGPok | documentation is software
                                                      521 Pleasant Valley Rd. | +1 315-323-1241 | that needs repair.
                                                      Potsdam, NY 13676-3213 | Sheepdog |
                                                    • John McKown
                                                      Well dang them to heck. When I order my module I guess what I ll do is glue it somehow to another little board that has a big, fat, easy-to-work-with, 40-pin
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Jan 24, 2008
                                                        Well dang them to heck. When I order my module I guess what I'll do
                                                        is glue it somehow to another little board that has a big, fat,
                                                        easy-to-work-with, 40-pin dip, at90something. I'll program that to
                                                        act as a crossbar switch as discussed in note ... (some earlier note
                                                        here that Yahoo message search can apparently no longer see).

                                                        To review: the module wants to poll a switch array by (say) putting
                                                        voltage on a column wire and then checking whether it gets through to
                                                        any of the row wires. So the at90something has to supply pins to
                                                        represent those column and row wires plus 8 more for the chord switches.

                                                        ===========================================

                                                        --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, Russ Nelson <nelson@...> wrote:

                                                        ... >> Will they let us program this thing?
                                                        >
                                                        > No, they stupidly won't. BOO HISS! Otherwise it would be perfect.
                                                      • John McKown
                                                        This note is only for people who care about the source for my executable hex file for the at90usbkey demo board, namely Chordite004.hex. Those who are
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Jun 15 11:18 AM
                                                          This note  is only for people who care about the  source  for my executable  hex file for the at90usbkey demo board, namely Chordite004.hex.  Those who are content to just load the  hex file and go can/should ignore what follows.

                                                          Atmel has been rearranging their site and some of the URLs in note 339 have  mutated.  The Atmel sof tware seems to have evolved as well.   As of today

                                                          the Flip chip programmer is (still) at
                                                          http://atmel.com/dyn/products/tools_card.asp?tool_id=3886
                                                          but  Atmel's keyboard and mouse software appear to have moved to

                                                                 http://atmel.com/dyn/general/tech_doc.asp?keyword=usb&DocTypeList=Software

                                                          The links in note 339 now take you to .pdf manuals for the demos, not code.  Originally I think they had a mouse for the at90usbkey and a keyboard for the  stk526.   Now it appears that's been reversed (that or I've lost some more neurons).   Look near the bottom of the page for what I believe to be most relevant to anyone who wants to follow the  coding path described in note 339.

                                                          USB HID Mouse for STK526 Software (revision 2.0.3)
                                                          USB HID keyboard for STK525 and AVRUSB Key Software (revision 2.0.2)

                                                          --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "John McKown" <john_3000@...> wrote:

                                                          >... FLIP 3 ... mouse demo ... keyboard demo ...

                                                          > So now the project looks as follows.
                                                          >
                                                          > (1) Combine the 2 demos to make a mouse+keyboard demo that runs on the
                                                          > 'key board. This is a USB compound device with 2 interfaces.
                                                          > (2) Replace Atmel's keyboard part (which merely prints a canned message
                                                          > when you punch the joystick button) with Chordite keyboard code.
                                                          > (3) Replace the mouse demo part with the mouse Chordite part
                                                          ...
                                                        • John McKown
                                                          Today I put into the files section of this Yahoo group a new patch, namely usb_chordite_6.patch and step-by-step instructions on how to use it, namely
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Jun 26 9:41 AM
                                                            Today I put into the files section of this Yahoo group a new patch, namely
                                                            usb_chordite_6.patch

                                                            and step-by-step instructions on how to use it, namely

                                                            source_directions.txt

                                                            to convert current ("Series 6") Atmel demo source code into USB Chordite source, then compile that source and download the resulting executable into the at90usbkey board. Then all you have to do is build a handset and wire the switches to Port B as discussed elsewhere.

                                                            Hopefully before too much longer I will pull all the USB stuff together into one zip file like the one for PS/2.
                                                          • John McKown
                                                            I neglected to add that the hex file itself, namely series6-Chordite.hex is also now in the files section for the benefit of those who don t care about all
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Jun 26 10:56 AM
                                                              I neglected to add that the hex file itself, namely

                                                              series6-Chordite.hex

                                                              is also now in the files section for the benefit of those who don't care about all these source manipulations.
                                                              ========================================================

                                                              --- In chordite@yahoogroups.com, "John McKown" <john_3000@...> wrote:
                                                              >
                                                              > Today I put into the files section of this Yahoo group a new patch, namely
                                                              > usb_chordite_6.patch
                                                              >
                                                              > and step-by-step instructions on how to use it, namely
                                                              >
                                                              > source_directions.txt
                                                              >
                                                              > to convert current ("Series 6") Atmel demo source code into USB Chordite source, then compile that source and download the resulting executable into the at90usbkey board. Then all you have to do is build a handset and wire the switches to Port B as discussed elsewhere.
                                                              >
                                                              > Hopefully before too much longer I will pull all the USB stuff together into one zip file like the one for PS/2.
                                                              >
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