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smoking bans harm environment

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  • aditmore@juno.com
    I oppose the NC-HB2 restaurant smoking ban, as well as helmet and seat belt laws and any other nannystate safety regulations, because the resulting
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 3, 2009
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      I oppose the NC-HB2 restaurant smoking ban, as well as helmet and seat belt laws and any other nannystate "safety" regulations, because the resulting population increase would destroy the environment and bankrupt social security.
      -Alan Ditmore, Leicester
       
      On Fri, 3 Apr 2009 11:36:47 -0400 "Lynn Tennant (Rep. Fisher)" <Fisherla@...> writes:

      Representative Susan Fisher

      N. C. House of Representatives

      Raleigh, North Carolina 27601

      (919) 715-2013

       

      April 3, 2009

      Picture of Susan C. Fisher

       

      The Raleigh Report

       

      From the Office of Representative Susan C. Fisher

       

      The House had a particularly busy week, considering legislation to protect health, boost our state health insurance plan and improve our education system.

       

      I am pleased with the progress we are making in these difficult times. There is little money to spend on new initiatives, but we continue to look for efficiencies and ways to improve the services the state offers. Some of these will come through the policies we are considering.

       

      The bill we approved to limit smoking in public and in workplaces would limit exposure to secondhand smoke and the health problems with which it is associated. Our hope is that this change in the law would lower health care costs for many people. The bill now goes to the Senate.

       

      We also elected new members to the University of North Carolina Board of Governors and remembered the late Reps. John Brown and Ted Kinney as part of a very full week.

       

      As always, I welcome your comments and suggestions, and I hope that you will contact me if I can be of any assistance.

       

      Education

       

      An act to make science safer in public schools has been unanimously approved in the House. One of the measures in the bill (HB 42) would direct each local board of education to certify to the State Board of Education that its high school and middle school science laboratories are equipped with appropriate personal protective equipment for students and teachers. The bill now goes to the Senate.

       

      Gifted students under the age of 16 could continue to attend community colleges under a bill (HB 65) that would re-enact a law that expired last September. The bill has moved through the House and is now in the Senate. The bill would also allow for students under the age of 14 to enroll in a Learn & Earn online course through a community college for college credit if that student has received appropriate approval. The intent of the bill is to serve the bright young people of North Carolina who want to get a head start on their college education.

       

      Members of the House elected eight members to the board that directs policy for the 16 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. Three of the eight members elected on Wednesday are new to the Board. The new members are Bill Daughtridge, a Rocky Mount businessman and former House member; Walter Davenport, a Raleigh accountant and trustee chairman at Elizabeth City State University; and James Deal Jr., a Boone attorney and trustee at Appalachian State University. The five re-elected members are Fred Mills Sr., a Raleigh construction executive; Dudley Flood, a public speaker and educational consultant from Raleigh ; Charles Mercer Jr., a Raleigh attorney; Dr. Al Roseman, an endodontist from Wilmington; and our own David Young, an Asheville business owner and chairman of the state Democratic Party.

       

      Health

       

      Legislation that would require more disclosure of medical malpractice judgments or settlements has received approval in the House and now heads to the Senate. The bill (HB 703) would require all physicians and physician assistants who are licensed or applying for licensure to report medical malpractice judgments or settlements to the North Carolina Medical Board. The board is now authorized to publish the information within the confines of medical and legal ethics.

       

      Smoking would be banned in restaurants and workplaces that employ or serve people under 18 years of age under a proposed law that has come through the House (HB 2). If the bill is approved in the Senate, North Carolina would join 35 other states with some sort of smoking ban. During several hours of debate on the bill, proponents argued that the smoking ban would improve the overall health of North Carolinians and limit unwanted exposure to dangerous secondhand smoke. Opponents of the bill claim that it infringes upon personal property rights of both individuals and business owners.

       

      Economic Recovery

       

      North Carolina ’s House and Senate Committees on Economic Recovery met this week to discuss tax provisions and transportation expenditures in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA is the federal stimulus package set in motion by President Obama to address the national economic downturn. North Carolina will receive about $6.1 billion from the recovery package to help with our own economic recovery efforts.  For more information on how the act will affect North Carolina , please visit the website at: www.ncrecovery.gov.

       

      Environment

       

      On Tuesday I attended the bill signing at the Old House Chamber in the State Capitol where Governor Perdue signed a bill that establishes Grandfather Mountain State Park (SB 89). North Carolina ’s newest state park is made up of about 2,500 acres of undeveloped land spanning Watauga, Avery and Caldwell counties. This spring, the state will formally purchase the land from the family of Hugh Morton, who developed the area as a tourist attraction in the 1950s. The purchase includes the nature center and a “mile-high” swinging bridge near Boone. The park will also include 12 miles of trails.

       

      Notes

       

      On Wednesday, members of the NC House honored former House member John Walter Brown with House Joint Resolution (HJR 53). During his tenure in the General Assembly, John Walter Brown served as chair of the Committee on Agriculture and made significant contributions as a member of several other committees, including Finance, State Government, Transportation, and Wildlife Resources. Among his other accomplishments is helping to establish the prestigious School of Veterinary Science at North Carolina State University . John Walter Brown died on November 20, 2008 at the age of 90. He represented Wilkes, Alexander and Yadkin Counties for 13 terms.

       

      On Thursday, members of the NC House formally honored the memory of former House member Theodore James “Ted” Kinney with House Joint Resolution (HJR 224). For 21 years, Ted Kinney served his country as an active member of the United States Army. During his tenure in the General Assembly, Ted Kinney made contributions as Chair of the Committee on Military, Veterans, and Indian Affairs and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Justice and Public Safety, and as a member of several other committees, including Education and Transportation. He was also active in his community and served as executive director of the Cape Fear Community Development Corporation and chair of the Fayetteville Human Services Commission. Theodore James “Ted” Kinney died on November 2, 2008 at the age of 76 from complications relating to diabetes. He represented Cumberland County for three terms. 

       

      Please remember that you can listen to each day’s session, committee meetings and press conferences on the General Assembly’s website at www.ncleg.net. Once on the site, select "audio," and then make your selection – House Chamber, Senate Chamber, Appropriations Committee Room or Press Conference Room.

       

       

       

       


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    • aditmore@juno.com
      That (overpopulation education) strategy is ongoing, but has mostly failed. My effort is to demonstrate that single issue coalitions can include those with
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 3, 2009
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        That (overpopulation education) strategy is ongoing, but has mostly failed.  My effort is to demonstrate that single issue coalitions can include those with totally different motives for the same binary issue position, which gains allies that the overpopulation movement lacks as such.
        similar politics include my opposition to gay antidiscrimination bills, but for different reasons than most opposers, opposition to banning REVERSE antiheterosexual discrimination as many landlords know that gays make good tenants.  Still, the single issue allies are accross the aisle.
                As the only overpopulation activist in the Asheville area, I really have no choice but to do it this way if I want any allies at all.
                I don't think social security pays medical.  Isn't that medicare?  It's medicaid, not medicare that smoking bankrupts because medicare and social security are for old folks and smokers don't usually grow old, and so use medicaid not medicare. If medicare and medicaid were to be combined then I don't think there would be a net loss.
                Oregon's Physician assisted suicide law is critical to overpopulation too.  Social Security may be good for overpopulation because many people are motivated to have kids to provide for them when old, which social security replaces. 
        -Alan
         
        On Fri, 3 Apr 2009 19:31:28 -0400 "Ron OPINIONATOR" <opinionator@...> writes:
        Hi Alan,
         
        I oppose the smoking ban also, because of liberty, but, I believe smokers can bankrupt social security much faster by paying smokers medical bills....
         
        If the world really is over populated, instead of unmanaged, then those so adamantly opposed to people having children, should get out there and educate the people who are doing the uncontrolled breeding.   Print fliers on recycled paper explaining to them what they've done to your planet...   You could also open abortion clinics and fund them with donations from like minded non-breeders, I'm sure the money would flow in like a river! 
         
        But, wouldn't it be better for cutting down the population if social security were to go bankrupt, then when everyone gets old, sick, and poor from medical bills they could just kill themselves!   They would have no children to miss them when they're gone... 
         
        Go after those who are really procreating uncontrollably, first and you'll solve the problem much quicker!
         
        Ron Leonard
         
        ----- Original Message -----
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        Sent: Friday, April 03, 2009 5:28 PM
        Subject: smoking bans harm environment

        I oppose the NC-HB2 restaurant smoking ban, as well as helmet and seat belt laws and any other nannystate "safety" regulations, because the resulting population increase would destroy the environment and bankrupt social security.
        -Alan Ditmore, Leicester
         
        On Fri, 3 Apr 2009 11:36:47 -0400 "Lynn Tennant (Rep. Fisher)" <Fisherla@...> writes:

        Representative Susan Fisher

        N. C. House of Representatives

        Raleigh, North Carolina 27601

        (919) 715-2013

         

        April 3, 2009

        Picture of Susan C. Fisher

         

        The Raleigh Report

         

        From the Office of Representative Susan C. Fisher

         

        The House had a particularly busy week, considering legislation to protect health, boost our state health insurance plan and improve our education system.

         

        I am pleased with the progress we are making in these difficult times. There is little money to spend on new initiatives, but we continue to look for efficiencies and ways to improve the services the state offers. Some of these will come through the policies we are considering.

         

        The bill we approved to limit smoking in public and in workplaces would limit exposure to secondhand smoke and the health problems with which it is associated. Our hope is that this change in the law would lower health care costs for many people. The bill now goes to the Senate.

         

        We also elected new members to the University of North Carolina Board of Governors and remembered the late Reps. John Brown and Ted Kinney as part of a very full week.

         

        As always, I welcome your comments and suggestions, and I hope that you will contact me if I can be of any assistance.

         

        Education

         

        An act to make science safer in public schools has been unanimously approved in the House. One of the measures in the bill (HB 42) would direct each local board of education to certify to the State Board of Education that its high school and middle school science laboratories are equipped with appropriate personal protective equipment for students and teachers. The bill now goes to the Senate.

         

        Gifted students under the age of 16 could continue to attend community colleges under a bill (HB 65) that would re-enact a law that expired last September. The bill has moved through the House and is now in the Senate. The bill would also allow for students under the age of 14 to enroll in a Learn & Earn online course through a community college for college credit if that student has received appropriate approval. The intent of the bill is to serve the bright young people of North Carolina who want to get a head start on their college education.

         

        Members of the House elected eight members to the board that directs policy for the 16 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. Three of the eight members elected on Wednesday are new to the Board. The new members are Bill Daughtridge, a Rocky Mount businessman and former House member; Walter Davenport, a Raleigh accountant and trustee chairman at Elizabeth City State University; and James Deal Jr., a Boone attorney and trustee at Appalachian State University. The five re-elected members are Fred Mills Sr., a Raleigh construction executive; Dudley Flood, a public speaker and educational consultant from Raleigh ; Charles Mercer Jr., a Raleigh attorney; Dr. Al Roseman, an endodontist from Wilmington; and our own David Young, an Asheville business owner and chairman of the state Democratic Party.

         

        Health

         

        Legislation that would require more disclosure of medical malpractice judgments or settlements has received approval in the House and now heads to the Senate. The bill (HB 703) would require all physicians and physician assistants who are licensed or applying for licensure to report medical malpractice judgments or settlements to the North Carolina Medical Board. The board is now authorized to publish the information within the confines of medical and legal ethics.

         

        Smoking would be banned in restaurants and workplaces that employ or serve people under 18 years of age under a proposed law that has come through the House (HB 2). If the bill is approved in the Senate, North Carolina would join 35 other states with some sort of smoking ban. During several hours of debate on the bill, proponents argued that the smoking ban would improve the overall health of North Carolinians and limit unwanted exposure to dangerous secondhand smoke. Opponents of the bill claim that it infringes upon personal property rights of both individuals and business owners.

         

        Economic Recovery

         

        North Carolina 's House and Senate Committees on Economic Recovery met this week to discuss tax provisions and transportation expenditures in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA is the federal stimulus package set in motion by President Obama to address the national economic downturn. North Carolina will receive about $6.1 billion from the recovery package to help with our own economic recovery efforts.  For more information on how the act will affect North Carolina , please visit the website at: www.ncrecovery.gov.

         

        Environment

         

        On Tuesday I attended the bill signing at the Old House Chamber in the State Capitol where Governor Perdue signed a bill that establishes Grandfather Mountain State Park (SB 89). North Carolina 's newest state park is made up of about 2,500 acres of undeveloped land spanning Watauga, Avery and Caldwell counties. This spring, the state will formally purchase the land from the family of Hugh Morton, who developed the area as a tourist attraction in the 1950s. The purchase includes the nature center and a "mile-high" swinging bridge near Boone. The park will also include 12 miles of trails.

         

        Notes

         

        On Wednesday, members of the NC House honored former House member John Walter Brown with House Joint Resolution (HJR 53). During his tenure in the General Assembly, John Walter Brown served as chair of the Committee on Agriculture and made significant contributions as a member of several other committees, including Finance, State Government, Transportation, and Wildlife Resources. Among his other accomplishments is helping to establish the prestigious School of Veterinary Science at North Carolina State University . John Walter Brown died on November 20, 2008 at the age of 90. He represented Wilkes, Alexander and Yadkin Counties for 13 terms.

         

        On Thursday, members of the NC House formally honored the memory of former House member Theodore James "Ted" Kinney with House Joint Resolution (HJR 224). For 21 years, Ted Kinney served his country as an active member of the United States Army. During his tenure in the General Assembly, Ted Kinney made contributions as Chair of the Committee on Military, Veterans, and Indian Affairs and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Justice and Public Safety, and as a member of several other committees, including Education and Transportation. He was also active in his community and served as executive director of the Cape Fear Community Development Corporation and chair of the Fayetteville Human Services Commission. Theodore James "Ted" Kinney died on November 2, 2008 at the age of 76 from complications relating to diabetes. He represented Cumberland County for three terms. 

         

        Please remember that you can listen to each day's session, committee meetings and press conferences on the General Assembly's website at www.ncleg.net. Once on the site, select "audio," and then make your selection - House Chamber, Senate Chamber, Appropriations Committee Room or Press Conference Room.

         

         

         

         


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