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MT:Dagestani Journalist Gunned Down

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  • mariuslab2002
    Dagestani Journalist Gunned Down 09 July 2013 | Issue 5165 By Yekaterina Kravtsova NewsTeam / AP Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev posing for a photograph outside
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 9, 2013
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      Dagestani Journalist Gunned Down
      09 July 2013 | Issue 5165
      By Yekaterina Kravtsova

      NewsTeam / AP
      Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev posing for a photograph outside Makhachkala, the Dagestan capital, in 2011.

      A prominent Dagestani journalist was gunned down Tuesday morning near the capital of Makhachkala, likely because of his critical writing on a range of political topics, investigators said.

      At 7 a.m. local time, Akhmenabi Akhmenabiyev, 55, a journalist for the weekly Novoye Delo newspaper, was shot and killed in his car by an unknown person in the village of Semender, the Investigative Committee said Tuesday in a statement.

      Dagestan is widely seen as the most dangerous part of Russia for journalists to work, with 17 reporters killed there in the last 13 years, including another Novoye Delo reporter, Magomedzagid Varisov, who was shot dead in 2005.

      The Investigative Committee's statement said probing the killing of journalists was top priority for the committee, but observers have expressed doubt that Akhmenabiyev's murderers would ever be convicted, saying law enforcement agencies paid no attention to Akhmenabiyev's complaints about the threats he received in the past.

      According to one of Akhmenabiyev's colleagues at the paper, Ragimat Adamova, he was constantly threatened by text message, and there was an attempt to kill him earlier this year, but investigators did not acknowledge the incident as a murder attempt at the time and refused to provide Akhmenabiyev with any security.

      "In January 2013, Akhmenabiyev was attacked and his car was shot at, but he did not suffer any injuries then. Various versions of what happened [on Tuesday] are being considered by investigative authorities, although the main one is that Akhmenabiyev was killed because of his professional activity," the Investigative Committee statement said.

      Akhmenabiyev was critical of local authorities and law enforcement agencies in his articles. Among the topics that he covered were corruption, violence in Dagestan, and religious issues.

      Adamova said Akhmenabiyev's most recent stories focused on the head of his native Akhvakhsky district, Ismail Magomedsharipov, whom he subjected to harsh criticism in his writing.

      Novoye Delo, established in the early 1990s, is highly respected among Dagestani residents. Enver Kisriyev, a Caucasus expert with the Russian Academy of Sciences, said Novoye Delo was one of the best papers in Dagestan, with a sharp political attitude, and that it was very critical of authorities.

      According to Kisriyev, who knew Akhmenabiyev personally, Akhmenabiyev was on a so-called "hit list" along with eight other Dagestani journalists, some of whom have also been killed, including Khadzhimurat Kamalov, head of another popular Dagestani newspaper, Chernovik. Kamalov was murdered in 2011.

      Authors of the hit list, distributed throughout Makhachkala in 2009, threatened revenge for killings of police officers. The authors were never discovered, but Kisriyev said there were suspicions that the list was made by relatives of Dagestani police officers killed by members of extremist religious groups.

      Akhmenabiyev was on the list because he was critical of law enforcement authorities in his articles, Kisriyev said, but people who made the list likely considered him part of a religious group as well because he often defended Dagestan's Muslim population.

      "He wasn't afraid of the topic and was very definitive in his approach, and he wasn't afraid of the threats that he received," said Kisriyev.

      Kisriyev also said despite some freedom of speech in the region, papers including Novoye Delo are being pressured by authorities with lawsuits and attempts to close them down. In addition, not a single case of a killing of a journalist in Dagestan has ever been uncovered, Kisriyev said.

      "Control of law enforcement authorities in Dagestan is harsh; not a single case was ever fully uncovered. Most likely, the reason for that is that criminals have backers in law enforcement agencies," he said.

      According to Adamova, Akhmenabiyev was meant to participate in a court hearing Wednesday to consider his complaint that investigators didn't open a criminal case into the murder attempt against him in January.

      A spokesperson for the Dagestani branch of the Investigative Committee said several killings of journalists in the region had in fact been solved. The spokesperson told the Moscow Times that three murders of 12 investigated by the committee since 2000 had led to convictions, including the murder of Czech journalist Martin Kraus, who was killed in 2003.

      The spokesman said most of the cases were closed because the alleged murderers — who are most often Dagestani guerillas — were killed during raids by special forces. But Kisriyev said confirmations of such killings were issued only in order to conceal who the real murderers were.

      Such high-profile cases as the murder of Novaya Gazeta reporter Anna Politkovskaya and Russian Forbes editor-in-chief Paul Khlebnikov, both of which occurred in Moscow, remain unsolved, as does the attack on former Kommersant reporter Oleg Kashin.

      According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, a U.S.-based non-governmental organization, Russia is the world's ninth most dangerous country for journalists to work in.

      The head of the Russian Union of Journalists, Vsevolod Bogdanov, said last November that some 340 journalists had been killed in Russia since 1990, with only 20 percent of cases investigated.

      Contact the author at e.kravtsova@...
    • Norbert Strade
      Caucasian Knot Caucasian Knot correspondent Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev assassinated in Dagestan Jul 09 2013 Today in the morning, Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev, a
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 10, 2013
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        Caucasian Knot

        "Caucasian Knot" correspondent Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev assassinated in Dagestan

        Jul 09 2013

        Today in the morning, Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev, a correspondent of the "Caucasian Knot", was shot dead 50 meters from his house in the village of Semender in Dagestan. This is the second "Caucasian Knot" correspondent killed in Northern Caucasus.

        In May 2012, Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev stated threats addressed to him, while on January 11 this year, unidentified persons fired three shots at him; fortunately, the bullet went by, and the journalist was not hurt.

        The name of Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev was on the so-called "execution list" - leaflets disseminated in September 2009 inMakhachkala, the capital of Dagestan, where anonymous authors promised to purposefully avenge the militiamen and civilians. This list included 16 lawyers, journalists and human rights defenders, well-known in Dagestan, in particular, Gadjimurad Kamalov, the publisher of the Dagestani weekly "Chernovik", who was killed on December 15, 2011.

        The attack on Akhmednabiev was discussed at a press conference on safety of journalists that took place on January 14 in Makhachkala. Then, Nariman Gadjiev, the Minister for Information Policy and Mass Communications of the Republic of Dagestan, said that as soon as he had learned about the assassination attempt, he immediately called Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev and asked whether he needed any support.

        Let us remind you that on July 25, 2010, Bella Ksalova, a "Caucasian Knot" correspondent in Karachay-Cherkessia, got into a road accident and died from injuries at hospital. It was later revealed that the car that had knocked her down was driven by Arsen Abaikhanov, a driver of the service Volga car of the "Rosprirodnadzor" for Karachay-Cherkessia, who had been registered at the narcology dispensary since 2007.

        See earlier reports: "Akhmednabi Akhmednabiev, correspondent of the "Caucasian Knot", attacked", "Journalists of the TV and radio company in Nalchik where the killed Gekkiev had worked earlier received threats from gunmen", "In Karachai-Circassia, car kills "Caucasian Knot" correspondent".

        Author: Makhach Akhmedov; Source: CK correspondent

        http://eng.kavkaz-uzel.ru/articles/25117/
      • mariuslab2002
        Caucasus Report Daghestani Journalist s Killing Raises Question: Who Will Be Next? Follow @RFERL July 10, 2013 Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev, deputy editor and
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 19, 2013
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          Caucasus Report

          Daghestani Journalist's Killing Raises Question: Who Will Be Next?

          Follow @RFERL

          July 10, 2013

          Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev, deputy editor and political commentator for the independent Russian-language weekly "Novoye delo" and a regular contributor to the website Kavkaz-Uzel, was shot dead early on July 9 close to his home on the outskirts of Makhachkala. He was at least the 13th journalist to be gunned down in Daghestan since 1992; none of the earlier killings, including that of Gadzhimurad Kamalov, editor of the weekly "Chernovik," in December 2011 has been solved.

          Both law-enforcement agencies and other media professionals assume that Akhmednabiyev was killed because of his professional activities. He wrote extensively about human-rights violations -- including abductions and torture by the police of suspected Islamic militants -- but also about local Daghestani politics, such as the situation in the western Akhvakh district where he practiced as a doctor in his native village of Karata.

          One of Akhmednabiyev's last articles highlighted protests in Akhvakh in April-May that demanded the resignation of district administrator Ismail Magomedsharipov. Other recent articles discussed the detention by police in late April in Kizlyar of a wedding cortege that displayed Islamic banners, and a recent initiative to unite Daghestan's construction workers in an independent union.

          "Novoye delo" editor in chief Gadzhimurad Sagitov described Akhmednabiyev's writing as "honest and frank," noting at the same time that he never stooped to ad hominem attacks.

          Akhmednabiyev was one of eight journalists named in a "death list" circulated in Makhachkala in late summer 2009 who had been earmarked for retribution for their imputed connivance in the killing of police and security personnel by members of the Islamic insurgency. The list, which contained some 250 names, was drawn up by relatives of the slain police officers.


          Akhmednabiyev had narrowly escaped death six months ago when unknown perpetrators opened fire on him from precisely the same spot where he was finally killed. The prosecutor's office opened an investigation into the willful destruction of property and the illegal possession of firearms, but not into attempted murder.

          After Akhmednabiyev's lawyer, Abdurashid Sheykhov, appealed that refusal in a local court, Daghestan's Supreme Court ruled in April that the prosecutor's office should open an attempted-murder investigation, but it failed to do so for reasons that remain unclear.

          Daghestani Prosecutor-General Andrei Nazarov has since been transferred to Bashkortostan. Similarly unclear is why law-enforcement agencies failed to try and trace the sender of threatening SMS messages Akhmednabiyev had received in recent months.

          In light of the focus of Akhmednabiyev's reporting, and the inclusion of his name on the 2009 death list, suspicion inevitably falls on law-enforcement agencies. Acting republic of Daghestan President Ramazan Abdulatipov was quoted as attributing the murder to "those for whom neither moral nor human norms exist," presumably meaning the North Caucasus insurgency, even though its members had no obvious reason to target Akhmednabiyev.

          A further possibility is that Akhmednabiyev was killed by one or another political interest groups out to undermine and discredit Abdulatipov in the run-up to the election by the republic's parliament of a successor to Magomedsalam Magomedov, whom Russian President Vladimir Putin dismissed as president of Daghestan in late January.

          Several of the more than 170 journalists who bore Akhmednabiyev's body in procession through Makhachkala on the day he died carried placards with the rhetorical question "Who will be next?"

          Kavkaz-Uzel has offered a reward of 200,000 rubles ($6,077) for information on the identity of Akhmednabiyev's killers.
          ---------------------------------------------------------------------
          --- In chechnya-sl@yahoogroups.com, "mariuslab2002" <mariuslab@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dagestani Journalist Gunned Down
          > 09 July 2013 | Issue 5165
          > By Yekaterina Kravtsova
          >
          > NewsTeam / AP
          > Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev posing for a photograph outside Makhachkala, the Dagestan capital, in 2011.
          >
          > A prominent Dagestani journalist was gunned down Tuesday morning near the capital of Makhachkala, likely because of his critical writing on a range of political topics, investigators said.
          >
          > At 7 a.m. local time, Akhmenabi Akhmenabiyev, 55, a journalist for the weekly Novoye Delo newspaper, was shot and killed in his car by an unknown person in the village of Semender, the Investigative Committee said Tuesday in a statement.
          >
          > Dagestan is widely seen as the most dangerous part of Russia for journalists to work, with 17 reporters killed there in the last 13 years, including another Novoye Delo reporter, Magomedzagid Varisov, who was shot dead in 2005.
          >
          > The Investigative Committee's statement said probing the killing of journalists was top priority for the committee, but observers have expressed doubt that Akhmenabiyev's murderers would ever be convicted, saying law enforcement agencies paid no attention to Akhmenabiyev's complaints about the threats he received in the past.
          >
          > According to one of Akhmenabiyev's colleagues at the paper, Ragimat Adamova, he was constantly threatened by text message, and there was an attempt to kill him earlier this year, but investigators did not acknowledge the incident as a murder attempt at the time and refused to provide Akhmenabiyev with any security.
          >
          > "In January 2013, Akhmenabiyev was attacked and his car was shot at, but he did not suffer any injuries then. Various versions of what happened [on Tuesday] are being considered by investigative authorities, although the main one is that Akhmenabiyev was killed because of his professional activity," the Investigative Committee statement said.
          >
          > Akhmenabiyev was critical of local authorities and law enforcement agencies in his articles. Among the topics that he covered were corruption, violence in Dagestan, and religious issues.
          >
          > Adamova said Akhmenabiyev's most recent stories focused on the head of his native Akhvakhsky district, Ismail Magomedsharipov, whom he subjected to harsh criticism in his writing.
          >
          > Novoye Delo, established in the early 1990s, is highly respected among Dagestani residents. Enver Kisriyev, a Caucasus expert with the Russian Academy of Sciences, said Novoye Delo was one of the best papers in Dagestan, with a sharp political attitude, and that it was very critical of authorities.
          >
          > According to Kisriyev, who knew Akhmenabiyev personally, Akhmenabiyev was on a so-called "hit list" along with eight other Dagestani journalists, some of whom have also been killed, including Khadzhimurat Kamalov, head of another popular Dagestani newspaper, Chernovik. Kamalov was murdered in 2011.
          >
          > Authors of the hit list, distributed throughout Makhachkala in 2009, threatened revenge for killings of police officers. The authors were never discovered, but Kisriyev said there were suspicions that the list was made by relatives of Dagestani police officers killed by members of extremist religious groups.
          >
          > Akhmenabiyev was on the list because he was critical of law enforcement authorities in his articles, Kisriyev said, but people who made the list likely considered him part of a religious group as well because he often defended Dagestan's Muslim population.
          >
          > "He wasn't afraid of the topic and was very definitive in his approach, and he wasn't afraid of the threats that he received," said Kisriyev.
          >
          > Kisriyev also said despite some freedom of speech in the region, papers including Novoye Delo are being pressured by authorities with lawsuits and attempts to close them down. In addition, not a single case of a killing of a journalist in Dagestan has ever been uncovered, Kisriyev said.
          >
          > "Control of law enforcement authorities in Dagestan is harsh; not a single case was ever fully uncovered. Most likely, the reason for that is that criminals have backers in law enforcement agencies," he said.
          >
          > According to Adamova, Akhmenabiyev was meant to participate in a court hearing Wednesday to consider his complaint that investigators didn't open a criminal case into the murder attempt against him in January.
          >
          > A spokesperson for the Dagestani branch of the Investigative Committee said several killings of journalists in the region had in fact been solved. The spokesperson told the Moscow Times that three murders of 12 investigated by the committee since 2000 had led to convictions, including the murder of Czech journalist Martin Kraus, who was killed in 2003.
          >
          > The spokesman said most of the cases were closed because the alleged murderers — who are most often Dagestani guerillas — were killed during raids by special forces. But Kisriyev said confirmations of such killings were issued only in order to conceal who the real murderers were.
          >
          > Such high-profile cases as the murder of Novaya Gazeta reporter Anna Politkovskaya and Russian Forbes editor-in-chief Paul Khlebnikov, both of which occurred in Moscow, remain unsolved, as does the attack on former Kommersant reporter Oleg Kashin.
          >
          > According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, a U.S.-based non-governmental organization, Russia is the world's ninth most dangerous country for journalists to work in.
          >
          > The head of the Russian Union of Journalists, Vsevolod Bogdanov, said last November that some 340 journalists had been killed in Russia since 1990, with only 20 percent of cases investigated.
          >
          > Contact the author at e.kravtsova@...
          >
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