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  • johan lagerfelt
    Dear List, Just a quick reminder that today it is exactly three months since the murder of Anna Politkovskaya. Have the police made any headway? Are they
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 7, 2007
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      Dear List,

      Just a quick reminder that today it is exactly three months since the
      murder of Anna Politkovskaya. Have the police made any headway? Are
      they busily interrogating suspects? Is the net closing around the
      guilty one?
      Of course not - these are not what the russian police have been
      tasked with. Their job at the moment is to do as little as possible
      while looking as if they are actually working. Should they, by
      chance, stumble upon any significant leads, no doubt orders will come
      from above to look the other way and mind their own business. In
      other words, continue to harass innocent citizens and collect bribes
      and protect the men and women in power.

      Secondly, for those who are able to tune in to Swedish television, on
      Thursday january 11th, at 22.00 on TV1, will be shown Caroline
      Campbell's film "When The Russian Bear Devours its Children".
      Caroline Campbell is a free-lance filmer who made this personal tale
      of the consequences of the war, and how it has affected different
      people. Watch it!

      Best regards

      Johan Lagerfelt
    • Jeremy Putley
      Telegraph Dissidents say BBC has caved in to Moscow By Andrew Pierce Last Updated: 12:19am GMT 01/01/2007 Leading dissidents from the former Soviet Union have
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 22, 2007
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        Telegraph

        Dissidents say BBC has caved in to Moscow

        By Andrew Pierce
        Last Updated: 12:19am GMT 01/01/2007


        Leading dissidents from the former Soviet Union have demanded an
        investigation into the BBC Russian Service, which they have accused
        of caving in to pressure to be less critical of President Vladimir
        Putin's regime.

        They have written to Mark Thompson, the BBC director-general,
        demanding an examination of what they claim is a string of examples
        of pro-Putin bias on the taxpayer-funded service, which has a weekly
        audience of two million.

        The service went off air in Moscow and St Petersburg last month
        around the time of the murder in London of Alexander Litvinenko, a
        former officer in the Russian security service. "Unexplained
        technical difficulties" with the BBC's local partners were blamed,
        but there is still no service in Moscow.

        The dissidents, led by Oleg Gordievsky, the former KGB spy turned
        MI6 agent, and Vladimir Bukovsky, an author who spent 12 years in
        Soviet prison camps, are particularly angered by the unexpected
        axing of a programme presented by Seva Novgorodsev that had run for
        19 years!

        Novgorodsev, who still broadcasts on the Russian Service, received
        the MBE from the Queen in 2004. His programme regularly had guests
        who were enemies of the Moscow regime, such as Litvinenko and the
        journalist Anna Politkovskaya whose murder he was investigating.
        The BBC has also received a protest letter signed by 1,000 listeners
        around the world.

        The dissidents' letter states: "At a time when Britain needs a
        strong voice in Russia more than at any point over the past decade,
        the taxpayer-funded BBC Russian Service radio seems to have
        considerably mellowed in its tone towards the Russian government.
        "By design or by neglect, it has become more accommodating of
        Russian government views, dispensing with difficult questions and
        denying a platform to some critics.

        "Is the BBC Russian Service trying to soften up its news coverage
        mindful of the Kremlin's ever-watchful eye over the airwaves? The UK
        taxpayer funds the BBC World Service so that Britain can have a
        strong voice in the world and it should not be compromised."

        A BBC spokesman said: "The service remains an important and strong
        source of impartial and independent news and current affairs
        renowned for asking difficult questions on behalf of its listeners.
        We reject any suggestion that we have made compromises in our
        questioning of any point of view in any debate."


        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?
        xml=/news/2007/01/01/nbbc01.xml
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