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This state is a drunk motherland with boots on

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  • goldfishbooks
    This state is a drunk motherland with boots on Anything secret sooner or later becomes obvious. When the KGB generals were planning and orchestrating the
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 31, 2002
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      This state is a drunk motherland with boots on

      Anything secret sooner or later becomes obvious. When the KGB generals were planning and orchestrating the explosions of the houses in Moscow, when they were stealing hexogen from army warehouses, they thought that no one would find out about it. In Ryazan after the explosion failed in the morning they were assuring us that those were just «training exercises». But the later unfolding of the events and the further actions of the generals gave them away.

      The explosions were a perfect excuse for the new invasion of Chechnya. The aggressors entered there on tanks - and it started... Electrical tortures, beatings, cutting off heads, ears, arms, selling corpses. «Kind and sympathetic» Russian people showed in Chechnya what they really are. Stalin's crimes who started the barbarian deportation of Chechens back in 1944 turned out to be surpassed. Sadistic generals were ordering, and fanatic cruel soldiers, contractors and professional thugs were acting on the orders with sadistic joy: they started to surround peaceful villages, shoot people, break into houses, take the «cleansed ones» away with them so that several days later their fellow villagers could find their corpses with traces of tortures just lightly covered with sand in nearby woods...

      Whatever lame excuses and justifications you may come up with, - dictatorship has started in Russia. Bloody terrorist dictatorship that, without looking back at the law, kills, tortures and maims anyone who somehow gets in its way. With all the oaths about dedication to the democracy and making curtsies before the West, this is no way you can call bloody crimes of Russian military clique in Chechnya democratic!..

      Many are guessing: what level can dictatorship reach this time? Stalin's camps with millions of prisoners working on tree-felling? Brezhnev's psycho wards with straight jackets and aminazine? So far we are observing the main major crime of this regime in Chechnya: open genocide of the whole nation. In Russia itself - the same ethnic cleansings, severe police terror against people from Caucasus, open persecution of democratic opposition by the KGB, completely falsified from the beginning spy trials, when by the way the poor «spies» are being held in jail for years while pending the trial... Independent mass media were either raided and shut down or taken away from their owners and nationalized, - either way no free press has remained that could dare openly criticize the government out loud as it did back in the 90-s during Yeltsin.

      The Orthodox Church, the most reactionary and fundamentalist organization, hostile to the very idea of personal rights and freedoms (what rights can «God's slaves» have anyway!..) is now longing for the governmental helm. The Church is dreaming to make everybody live according to its own rules. It is shoving its ideology into schools, hospitals, jails, army and everywhere else...

      Russia of the 21st century is a macho wearing a camouflage uniform with a mask on his face and a machine gun in his hands. This macho has just killed a Chechen woman or a child. He is ready to shoot or kick to death anyone who would dare say a single word against him, whether in Chechnya or in Russia. He is a punisher, and that says it all. He does not have any elementary understanding about the individual rights, the value of human life or the presumption of innocence. He only understands and respects the power. You cannot explain him that he is wrong, that he is a criminal, - you can only shoot him.

      Now in Russia the new government won't probably have to send millions of prisoners to the tree-felling. Why do that if everybody is obedient as a sheep anyway? «Why would flocks need the gifts of freedom?..» But those few who dare to resist, take to the streets and protest, - most likely they will be facing tortures a lot more severe than aminazine or haloperidol of the Brezhnev times. As an example, you just can't comprehend the insane case of Eugene (Yevgeny) Novozhilov from Krasnodar, who was locked up in a mental hospital by the FSB because of some nonsense accusation (article 207, Russian Criminal Code).

      So how else can these poor victims oppose the government except for having their own courage and self-sacrifice? So far a slogan is their only weapon. Even a megaphone will most likely be banned since legitimate democratic meetings permitted by the authorities are coming to naught at least in Moscow. They are left with just unsanctioned meetings, with an arrest within the first five minutes; as well as various forms of addressing people with leaflets and «samizdat» free press. And also the internet before they block the access to it...

      The subjects of a totalitarian state are not supposed to have any rights or freedoms, - in Russia they have never had them. They only had the «right» to die because of a fancy of another tyrant, while praising him. In 1991 it started to look to us, as if it was a sweet dream, that the Freedom had come and people had finally acquired their legal rights. Today that short thaw is over, and everything is going back to where it was before. Criticizing the government is automatically considered a betrayal of the motherland, the way it has always been here, and the punishment for that can reach death sentence (which will be introduced again, this time without any irony, «on requests of the working people», who are strongly asking about it, even demanding.) The blood of Chechen people is putting an irremovable stain on the regime: now they have nowhere to go; now they have to crush the opposition at any cost, by any pretexts, beatings and violence. Otherwise sometime they will have to pay the price for bombing Grozny (Johar), for all «cleansings», and for the September explosions of 1999 in Moscow...

      In vain do the human rights activists during their meetings talk about following the law and even threaten Putin with impeachment, as they used to do before!.. What a naivete! As if in the country there is a force capable of making FSB officers obey the sacred laws and human rights!.. Who and how can make them do that? Well, maybe human rights activists with their speeches and petitions to the European Council? No, this way you can't get the rude totalitarian power that talks to opponents by the language of prisons, falsified criminal cases, tanks and nuclear blackmail.

      Democratic mechanisms, - elections, referendums, etc. - are also in the hands of this KGB-militarist gang, from long time ago. It is impossible to elect someone who the Kremlin government does not want to get elected. While it may look like constitutional democratic mechanisms remained, their work has turned into a profanation. When all the alternative they have at the elections is the choice between an FSB general and an acting official of the Communist Party bureaucracy, - it makes no sense to even go to such elections...

      The FSB is trying to reach and grab the throat of freedom with its paws, - and at the same time it's launching the profanation campaign. This is one of the most important tools during the new stage of the existence of our "thousand year Reich". Really, why eliminate, shoot and send to the tree-felling labor in Siberia hundreds and thousands of dissidents and human rights activists, when all you have to do is conduct a Civil referendum, where you can just give them some good food and that's it? And those who did not go to that forum, who did not fall for that sweet bait, will remain in isolation, in the vacuum, even without prisons no one in the country will ever see or hear them... Why get the Council of Europe and the entire civilized world concerned about physical violence against journalists when you can quietly «without raising noise or dust» start a «litigation of two proprietary business entities»? Everybody will be demonstratively glad, like in a window display, just like after a lobotomy. And those who refused to undergo that operation, will be executed under some «financial» or «spying» pretext, like TV-6 or Pasko.

      But even if they won't send millions of volunteer slaves to camps, the life won't be any easier for the educated, enlightened and civilized citizens. Your own place of residence can be turned into a detention facility, - just like it has always been here. They say that it is also impossible to run a business here without violating any laws. But instead, some kinds of laws can be passed that you won't be able to live by them without violating them. And it looks like it's coming...

      You have to start all over again, form the very first proclamations, from the experience of the 18-th century revolutionaries. Without repeating the same mistakes, of course. You have to give up all your hopes that everything might just settle one way or another and die down by itself; you can't just keep working with no hopes for success, with no prospects excerpt for a room ?101. «Abandon Hope, All Ye Who Enter Here». You can't practice revolution just on weekends and during evenings after work, - revolution can only be your occupation and your calling at the same time, it's like escaping into a monastery, denouncing all secular mundane worldly affairs and worries. Revolution is Service, bearing your own cross, and Nechayev was right when he wrote: «a revolutionary is a doomed man».

      It is unknown when such people will appear in Russia in some noticeable numbers. So far you can only count them by hand. A grey dictatorship, described by Strugatsky, is now triumphant all over the place. «Masks are thrown off, fascism is coming!» - as one communist poet wrote in 1991...

      There is only one hope and support for the revolutionaries in this country: nations oppressed by the empire, natives of national «autonomies». There the percentage of those who do not accept Putin's policies is almost always higher. And why even mention the support of Chechnya in Moslem regions of the empire?

      If «patriots» are complaining that «thieves» were ruling the country during Yeltsin, «blue thieves» like Alkhen (*), then now the country is run by shameless arrogant KGB, murderers of whole nations, which is a lot worse. It would be better if they were just stealing!.. Money and property is something you earn anyway. But the ones «cleansed» to death and buried right near the military base where the murderers are stationed, they cannot be brought back to life even by the almighty lord Judd, who time after time makes statements about the «improving» of the situation of human rights in Chechnya.

      Wild country with wild people, who like to be lashed by a whip, and who love dictatorship and the dictator, is continuing its afterlife existence. For what? Who needs that? (I'd like to answer with the words of one popular Russian song: «Nobody needs it!") Their children will be dragged right out of their beds, put in handcuffs and taken to the military conscription headquarters, the police will not give a darn about any postponements, just like it was happening in 2001 when police were breaking in student dorms, - and they will be silent! (According to Russian laws, full time students are postponed from military service until they graduate. Some schools also have military classes where male students can also become reserve officers, - MB). All the trial experiments are only being saluted here, except for maybe a pathetic small group of human rights activists who are capable of running a meeting in Moscow, with the paticipation of even a 100 people, and who are endlessly filing complaints about the government right in its (the government's) courts and attorney's offices...

      Not only there has never been any freedom or democracy in Russia, but as it is clear now, Russia is genetically incapable of that. What is happening now is a natural reaction of tearing away a foreign body by an organism. Freedom and democracy are foreign to Russia, but instead the longing for dictatorship, bootcamp and whip, which is irrational from a normal person viewpoint, is on the contrary quite natural for Russia and they are so used to it. By Putin's rating and his deeds, - from genocide of Chechen people to brutal humiliations of Pasko and journalists of TV-6, - we can see this «force of tearing away a foreign body», as well as the force of habit to be a slave. Whatever crimes are being committed, the rating is never going down.

      The country needs a revolutionary party just like everybody needs air. (**) Such a party is the only doctor who will finally inject into the country «what was prescribed»: the euthanasia shot, - to put her out of the misery. For the past several centuries we have been roaming in circles stepping on the same shovel, trying to start liberal reforms, that somehow always end up with beatings of foreigners and fires for infidels. (Or for their holy books first, as it already happened in Yekaterinburg.) Enough! We are fed up! Time to end!

      The bolts, with a gritting sound, are slowly tightening up. The Yeltsin's thaw is now gone. It is too naive to complain to courts and attorney's offices, demanding its return. The people must find their own strength, get up and sweep away that government, arrest it and, preferably, - hang them on the street lamps...

      Boris Stomakhin,
      for «Kavkaz-Center»

      (*) Al'khen - a character from 'The Twelve Chairs' by Il'f and Petrov, - a blue eyed thief, running a home for the disabled, - hence the expression btw, used by George Bush - 'I looked in his eyes, I saw a soul of an honest man' - the words belong to Ostap Bender, the hero of this book, a conman. - A.L..

      (**) I heard the same opinion from a group of Russians even before the first invasion of Chechnya: ' We need anothr revolution', then, they just had one, may be they should ' hang them on the street lamps', not just pull down the statues. - A.L.


      2002-03-25 17:33:22


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mikhail Ramendik
      Hello, Monday, April 01, 2002, 3:43:41 AM, goldfishbooks wrote: g The bolts, with a gritting sound, are slowly tightening up.
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 1, 2002
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        Hello,

        Monday, April 01, 2002, 3:43:41 AM, goldfishbooks <goldfishbooks@...> wrote:

        g> The bolts, with a gritting sound, are slowly tightening up. The
        g> Yeltsin's thaw is now gone. It is too naive to complain to courts
        g> and attorney's offices, demanding its return. The people must find
        g> their own strength, get up and sweep away that government, arrest
        g> it and, preferably, - hang them on the street lamps...

        g> Boris Stomakhin,
        g> for «Kavkaz-Center»

        Now tell me, which country in the world would NOT 'persecute' someone
        who calls for this kind of violence? Would an American, or, say,
        Danish writer remain at large after calling for 'hanging the
        government on the street lamps'?

        While Boris Stomakhin (whom I have met several times - he lives in
        Moscow) remains free, Russia remains a country with, perhaps, the
        greatest level of free speech in the entire world. So much for
        'dictatorship'.

        Yours, Mikhail Ramendik
      • informationocean
        ... ote: g The bolts, with a gritting sound, are slowly tightening up. The g Yeltsin s thaw is now gone. It is too naive to complain to courts g
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 1, 2002
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          --- In chechnya-sl@y..., Mikhail Ramendik <mikhram@d...> wrote:
          > Hello,
          >
          > Monday, April 01, 2002, 3:43:41 AM, goldfishbooks <goldfishbooks@b...> wr=
          ote:
          >
          > g> The bolts, with a gritting sound, are slowly tightening up. The
          > g> Yeltsin's thaw is now gone. It is too naive to complain to courts
          > g> and attorney's offices, demanding its return. The people must find
          > g> their own strength, get up and sweep away that government, arrest
          > g> it and, preferably, - hang them on the street lamps...
          >
          > g> Boris Stomakhin,
          > g> for «Kavkaz-Center»
          >
          > Now tell me, which country in the world would NOT 'persecute' someone
          > who calls for this kind of violence? Would an American, or, say,
          > Danish writer remain at large after calling for 'hanging the
          > government on the street lamps'?

          The US Constitution has an amendment called Bill of Rights where it is spel=
          led out that citizens have the right to change government by the force. It =
          does not specify where to dispose the bodies of the dismantled government. =
          Knowing the american pragmatism it would not be the subject of long discussi=
          on. However thanks to the Constitution which also gives the right to pursue=
          happiness, in the last two hundred years and some years no such measure was=
          needed.

          >
          > While Boris Stomakhin (whom I have met several times - he lives in
          > Moscow) remains free, Russia remains a country with, perhaps, the
          > greatest level of free speech in the entire world. So much for
          > 'dictatorship'.

          Let me say this. During sovietism Russia had so called proletar dictatura =
          in which the dictatum was firmly in the hand of the Central Committee of the=
          communist party. That Central Committee created the two basic pillars of t=
          heir power, the KGB on the left and the Red Army on the right. Present day =
          Russia differ from the above structure just slightly, namely the Central Com=
          mitte was knocked out by Yeltsin, but the two pillars are there still standi=
          ng. In recent time the left pillar was enhanced somewhat and the right pill=
          ar is under architectural review, because the soil it is standing now - Chec=
          hnya - is somewhat unstable and can fall as statues did especially of tovari=
          sh Wladimir Uljanov. I will call Russia a democratic free country when I wi=
          ll not see any reference to the soviet past. No village of "Sovietskaya", n=
          o newspaper of "Komsomolskaya Pravda", no soviet hymn coming from the radio,=
          etc... When I heard the soviet hymn played at the Olympic I looked for a g=
          un to shoot someone.

          János
        • Norbert Strade
          ... Mikhail, I m surprised you are asking this question once again, since we ve been through it before. In Denmark, nobody would persecute you for statements
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 1, 2002
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            Mikhail Ramendik wrote:

            > Hello,
            >
            > Monday, April 01, 2002, 3:43:41 AM, goldfishbooks <goldfishbooks@...> wrote:
            >
            > g> The bolts, with a gritting sound, are slowly tightening up. The
            > g> Yeltsin's thaw is now gone. It is too naive to complain to courts
            > g> and attorney's offices, demanding its return. The people must find
            > g> their own strength, get up and sweep away that government, arrest
            > g> it and, preferably, - hang them on the street lamps...
            >
            > g> Boris Stomakhin,
            > g> for «Kavkaz-Center»
            >
            > Now tell me, which country in the world would NOT 'persecute' someone
            > who calls for this kind of violence? Would an American, or, say,
            > Danish writer remain at large after calling for 'hanging the
            > government on the street lamps'?
            >
            > While Boris Stomakhin (whom I have met several times - he lives in
            > Moscow) remains free, Russia remains a country with, perhaps, the
            > greatest level of free speech in the entire world. So much for
            > 'dictatorship'.

            Mikhail,

            I'm surprised you are asking this question once again, since we've been
            through it before. In Denmark, nobody would persecute you for statements
            like the ones made by Stomakhin, or worse. Here you need to make a
            specific threat against a specific person or group of persons in order
            to be covered by some law paragraph. And even in such cases there's a
            tradition for wide tolerances from the side of the justice system. And
            such is the situation more or less everywhere in the Western countries.
            As far as I know the tolerance towards openly uttered opinions is even
            greater in the US, where the constitution specifically entitles you to
            freedom of expression. It's only in the sector of private legal action
            where you can get into trouble if you feel like making outrageous
            statements.

            This is exactly the difference between democratic states (even with
            their various shortcomings with regard to civil liberties) and a country
            like Russia which today has some formal democratic traits (though no
            real constitutional democracy), but which in reality is a dictatorship
            by an alliance of different oligarchs, mafia groups and the old and new
            KGB, headed by the latter. There is no division of power. The man at the
            head of the state is someone who in an ordinary democracy would have
            gone through a screening process resulting in a ban from political
            positions (in the best case for him), but more probably would have had
            to spend some time behind bars (even without Chechnya).

            It is perhaps hard to understand by someone inside Russia who is
            relatively young that the fact itself that the country accepts a
            president who is a product of one of the most vicious criminal
            organizations of world history, who served this organization and is
            still proud of it, who then for some years worked as the right-hand man
            for one of the top mafia bosses and finally was catapulted upwards in
            the system by his comrades in crime, does not make people think of the
            word "democracy" or "freedom" in the first place. And it's not just the
            president. The complete system down to the members of the street police
            is completely corrupt and criminal. And the top echelons are serious and
            dangerous political gangsters who are responsible for large-scale theft,
            looting of their own and other countries, political murders in and
            around Russia, mass terror against their own population, plus the
            Nazi-style war in Chechnya. - So it's no wonder that a few people begin
            to think like Stomakhin.

            When I went to school I was taught that citizens of a democratic country
            *have the duty* to stand up against such tendencies, and that it is not
            only allowed but necessary to fight an authoritarian regime,
            *especially* if it's your own. This too is a difference to the
            mystification of the "good Czar", the "party that knows what is best for
            everyone" or "the Russian state". In a civilized society the state has
            no mystical properties. It simply is a tool for its citizens. The same
            tendencies as in Russia, the attempts to create a pseudo-religious role
            for the "State", are seen in all European countries which haven't had a
            chance yet to create a civil society.

            I don't agree with everything Stomakhin writes. Especially his idea
            about a Russian "genetical" tendency towards authoritarianism is racist
            nonsense. And the idea of a "revolution" sounds stupid too. Russia has
            certainly had enough revolutions. All the revolutions have only lead to
            a new group of autocrats taking the place of the former ones. The latest
            "democratic" revolution even turned out to be a farce in which the old
            masters simply continued under new names. The KGB is still there and
            continues its crimes both against Russia and against humanity with total
            impunity.

            But there is a Russian "misery", though it's not genetical. It's a
            question of collective memory and experience, which it is hard to change
            under the conditions of an information blockade. The large majority of
            Russians today has still as little access to independent information as
            in the days of Brezhnev. The style of the disinformation has changed,
            that's all. Freedom of information is, as we say here in Denmark, "a
            town in Russia". People like Stomakhin can say what they want because
            nobody takes them seriously. Those who are taken seriously by the
            criminal state structures are treated like Babitsky and Politkovskaya,
            or in the worst case like Starovoitova and the many other murdered
            journalists and democratic activists.
            The Russian collective mentality *has* a problem. This problem is the
            result of hundreds of years of continuous most brutal repression - a
            combination of the worst traits of European Middle Age and Asian
            autocracy (as Karl Marx put it ;-). That's what some have called the
            "slave soul". It takes a very long time under conditions of political
            and economical freedom *plus* a system of deliberate democratic
            education to change that. It's this misery which allows poltical
            gangsters like those who today have usurped the throne to blind the
            people with those mystical concepts about the "State" and the mysterious
            "dignity" of its governing structures. Though of course a state can't
            have more dignity than the people who command it. And there's absolutely
            *zero* dignity connected with the Russian Federation today.
            It simply is the most easy for the average Russian to believe in this
            stuff and to repress any doubts about the leaders, even if everybody can
            look at Mr. Putin and see what he is. This is called a "state of
            denial". And those who can't be fooled in this way usually fall into
            apathy, another product of the slave society. - That's the main reason
            why some people like Stomakhin are allowed to play the political clown.
            They are left alone in order to fool the last 1 percent and the
            foreigners.

            But don't believe that it will stay this way! Present-day Russia is no
            "Thousand year Reich" as Stomakhin believes, and I don't think its
            present leadership will be able to sit for 12 years like the original
            Nazis. There simply isn't enough of an economical base or an organized
            society in order to try that. The medieval mental structures come in the
            way here. We'll probably see bloody changes when the mafia groups are
            forced to reconfigure themselves. But hopefully some of the present
            criminals will survive that, and they, their Chechen and Russian victims
            as well as the world community will get a chance to document and sort
            out their activities in Chechnya, so all can learn from it.

            To come back to the "state of denial", which we see here on the list as
            well: It's really remarkable how people in Russia who we thought we knew
            are able to change almost in seconds. I've experienced it myself and
            heard it from many colleagues, how perfectly normal people with an
            academic education who supported democratic changes already back in
            Soviet times, can take one ideological U-turn after the other, together
            with whoever is the current "autokrator". As long as that tradition
            isn't broken and the barbarian, parasitic state is brought under the
            control of its citizens, things will go from bad to worse.

            Best regards,
            Norbert
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