Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [cheap-shelters] MH roof-overs

Expand Messages
  • joe R DuPont
    Maybe the idea is to heat the roof and melt the damn snow.. and go with a rood 4/12 On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 16:00:10 -0400 Pat Meadows
    Message 1 of 46 , Aug 31, 2003
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Maybe the idea is to heat the roof and melt the damn snow.. and go with
      a rood 4/12


      On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 16:00:10 -0400 Pat Meadows <pat@...>
      writes:
      On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 12:18:06 -0700 (PDT), you wrote:


      <much snip of good info>


      >Beefy supports assume the roof will be carrying the weight of the snow.
      If you live in heavy snow country, this could be an incredible amount of
      weight. So -- in those areas -- most of us build roofs which are steep
      and designed to shed the snow. Interestingly enough, a 6/12 pitch (to
      visualize . . . a 12/12 pitch is a 45-degree angle . . . a 6/12 pitch is
      a 22-1/2 degree angle . . . or HALF of the steeper 45-degree angle) only
      allows one a 20 pound per square foot design load deduction for snow load
      and you can't get more than that no matter how steep your roof is!

      <more major snip>

      We live in snow country, but nothing like the Rockies or
      other *really serious snow country*. Our average winter
      will have 5' of snow here, but of course not all at once.
      I've only lived here two winters so far, one had almost no
      snow. The other had a lot of snow, but the largest single
      snowfall was about 30". I'm told that we do occasionally
      get 'lake effect snow here' - we're about 150 miles from
      Buffalo, NY.

      >==========
      >My gosh -- this description has taken so long -- think I'll save the
      "new roof" for a separate post.

      Yes. :)


      BTW, the existing dilapidated trailer has a peaked roof, not
      a rounded one. This is better, I think.

      Thanks! I keep all these posts: neither my husband nor I
      are creative do-it-yourself types, so I need to rely mostly
      on information from other people - what other people have
      done.

      We'll also consider something like this:

      http://leastcost.freeyellow.com/index.html

      We couldn't do most of it ourselves and would need to pay to
      have it done. But we can get fairly cheap labor here.

      I think the poles and over-roof would be more feasible,
      though. Faster, certainly.

      Pat


      Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      ADVERTISEMENT




      Remember to keep it light and friendly. :-)

      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • joe r dupont
      Better yet would be to have the lights lit just under the water with a fan on top. actually a a floating screened box wtih a fan in the middle taking bugs that
      Message 46 of 46 , Sep 3, 2003
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Better yet would be to have the lights lit just under the water with a
        fan
        on top.
        actually a a floating screened box wtih a fan in the middle taking bugs
        that are going for a lamp under the fan is a great idea.
        I've seen what happens at my moms gazebo with a ceiling fan and
        light.

        On Wed, 03 Sep 2003 08:02:49 -0400 Pat Meadows <pat@...>
        writes:
        On Tue, 2 Sep 2003 18:50:13 -0400, you wrote:

        > At the pond a fish jumps (reference fish) and in the
        >middle of the pond floats an odd object with a Solar electric
        >panel, a light, and a fan (reference) this attracts the mosquitoes,
        >and blows them down into the water to feed your fish. You wish
        >to sit, so you take a couple of___leaves (reference) to sit on."
        >..................................etc....
        >
        >I used to love to read those. ;O)

        It's a nice way to write, and I think sometimes the easiest
        way to describe things.

        >Anyway, it sounds like your ideas are coming together well,
        >but still are loose enough to be flexible. Here are two more ideas:
        >
        >1) Ivy can make even a shack look like the wall of an English cottage.
        >It also keeps sunny walls cool, but then drops its leaves, so that the
        >sunlight can come through in the cool months. It would fit well in
        >your arboreal green theme. It also gives you a way to make simple
        >crude fences, and even piles of debris, and rough trellises look great,
        >and act as extensions of the house out further onto the property.

        Yes, I have hidden things with vines before! :) I've also
        used them for shade, even in a rented apartment (morning
        glories, yard-long beans).

        <snip>

        >post. What I want to communicate here is that if you want your
        >sunspace to use savaged glass, instead of plastic, then you will
        >want your posts on different centers. Now, if you can have your
        >posts on twelve foot centers, then it could work for both. Plastic
        >glazings are economical in 4' widths. Doorwall replacement units
        >also can come in a width for 4' spacing (46x76), but the 34"x76"
        >glass is far more common, and it mounts onto the face of posts on
        >3' centers. Again, posts on 12' centers leave the decision open.
        >That is a good spacing for a roof-over system. Start collecting
        >your glass as soon as you are settled. It may take a while to
        >get enough for a long wall.
        >

        Thanks, this is valuable information. I'll remember it.

        Pat


        Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        ADVERTISEMENT




        Remember to keep it light and friendly. :-)

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.