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Re: [charlesives] An Ivesian Moment

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  • Afmmjr@aol.com
    Hi Scotty, I had the rare opportunity to receive the Charles Ives postage stamp, just outside Danbury, thanks to Danbury composer Howard Rovics. The post
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 19, 2007
      Hi Scotty,

      I had the rare opportunity to receive the Charles Ives postage stamp, just
      outside Danbury, thanks to Danbury composer Howard Rovics. The post office
      gave us the address of the Ives home and we caused a ruckus due to 2 or more
      dogs barking. We rode off like bandits, not wanting to be discovered. Guess
      the cat is out of the bag, now.

      To Scott: we celebrate Chinese New Year in my home. (I speak Mandarin at
      home, albeit brokenly.)

      To the issues: Diverse marching bands is the kernal of the Universe
      Sympony's seemingly chaotic 3 orchestras. Each orchestra is in its own axis (or
      dimension), only to have the occasional line up, or eclipse. It really is simply
      an amplification of a concept.

      Johnny


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • scottyzpt@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/19/2007 9:50:15 A.M. Central Standard Time, music@c500.com writes: Charlie had that ability to combine the pedestrian and popular with the
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 19, 2007
        In a message dated 2/19/2007 9:50:15 A.M. Central Standard Time,
        music@... writes:

        Charlie had that ability to combine the pedestrian and popular with
        the spiritual and sublime -- it's one of the many things that sets
        his music apart from almost everyone else -- that's why the call him
        the American Beethoven -- I always thought Beethoven was the Austrian
        Ives....


        _____
        A collection of his music is like Forrest Gump's box of chocolates......you
        never know what you're gonna get.
        I was particularly interested in his interest in the Transcendentalists,
        Col. Robert Shaw, and the human rights stuff. Sort of made me wonder if he
        might not have been one of those old New England Unitarians at heart.
        Scotty


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Shaffer
        the New England Unitarians were of his grand[arents generation, but rather than it be perceived as old stuff he created a voice for that tradition -- and in
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 19, 2007
          the New England Unitarians were of his grand[arents generation, but
          rather than it be perceived as "old stuff" he created a voice for
          that tradition -- and in his own life (and Johnny Reinhard and I were
          just talking about this about an hour ago) that Ives was probably the
          first urban composer who led the way for the expansive sounds of
          Copeland, Gershwin, Bernstein, Goldsmith, Sylvestri etc. -- he
          composed film music before there was film and as a business executive
          he was credited for inventing the concept of estate planning from an
          insurance perspective -- AND (and this is why some think he's an
          outright pinko:) he thought there should be a cap on what top
          corporate executives make -- Charlie's surprizes are not just limited
          to music -- I've been listening to his music since 1959 -- by now, I
          always know what I'm gonna get from his music -- wonder upon wonder --

          ms

          At 01:57 PM 2/19/2007, you wrote:


          >In a message dated 2/19/2007 9:50:15 A.M. Central Standard Time,
          ><mailto:music%40c500.com>music@... writes:
          >
          >Charlie had that ability to combine the pedestrian and popular with
          >the spiritual and sublime -- it's one of the many things that sets
          >his music apart from almost everyone else -- that's why the call him
          >the American Beethoven -- I always thought Beethoven was the Austrian
          >Ives....
          >
          >_____
          >A collection of his music is like Forrest Gump's box of chocolates......you
          >never know what you're gonna get.
          >I was particularly interested in his interest in the Transcendentalists,
          >Col. Robert Shaw, and the human rights stuff. Sort of made me wonder if he
          >might not have been one of those old New England Unitarians at heart.
          >Scotty
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >No virus found in this incoming message.
          >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          >Version: 7.5.441 / Virus Database: 268.18.2/692 - Release Date:
          >2/18/2007 4:35 PM

          ----------



          No virus found in this outgoing message.
          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          Version: 7.5.441 / Virus Database: 268.18.2/692 - Release Date: 2/18/2007 4:35 PM


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • scottyzpt@aol.com
          In a message dated 2/19/2007 11:10:04 A.M. Central Standard Time, Afmmjr@aol.com writes: To the issues: Diverse marching bands is the kernal of the Universe
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 19, 2007
            In a message dated 2/19/2007 11:10:04 A.M. Central Standard Time,
            Afmmjr@... writes:

            To the issues: Diverse marching bands is the kernal of the Universe
            Sympony's seemingly chaotic 3 orchestras. Each orchestra is in its own axis
            (or
            dimension), only to have the occasional line up, or eclipse. It really is
            simply
            an amplification of a concept.


            ______
            Wouldn't we just love to know what his vision for that one looked like? I
            played an excerpt from the "past", and it sounded like the "tinkerings of
            creation". Did he write somewhere what he intended? The Universe seems a bit
            like his "thoery of everything".
            Scotty


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Douglas Jordon
            ... I like to compare him to Bach. He was an innovator in just about every idiom he composed in. He was obscure, he was an organist. And his music, while
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 19, 2007
              scottyzpt@... wrote:

              >
              >In a message dated 2/19/2007 9:50:15 A.M. Central Standard Time,
              >music@... writes:
              >
              >Charlie had that ability to combine the pedestrian and popular with
              >the spiritual and sublime -- it's one of the many things that sets
              >his music apart from almost everyone else -- that's why the call him
              >the American Beethoven -- I always thought Beethoven was the Austrian
              >Ives....
              >
              I like to compare him to Bach. He was an innovator in just about every
              idiom he composed in. He was obscure, he was an organist. And his music,
              while modern, was infused with the music of the last century.
            • scottyzpt@aol.com
              In a message dated 2/19/2007 1:09:26 P.M. Central Standard Time, music@c500.com writes: AND (and this is why some think he s an outright pinko:) he thought
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 19, 2007
                In a message dated 2/19/2007 1:09:26 P.M. Central Standard Time,
                music@... writes:

                AND (and this is why some think he's an
                outright pinko:) he thought there should be a cap on what top
                corporate executives make -- Charlie's surprizes are not just limited
                to music -- I've been listening to his music since 1959 -- by now, I
                always know what I'm gonna get from his music -- wonder upon wonder --



                _____
                Guess he'd have been a Democrat these days. Who knows.

                Two questions I don't get answered in his stuff on the internet.
                What became of Harmony......did she help catalogue his music, or had he not
                particularly shared most of it with her?
                There was an adopted daughter, I think.......?
                Did any of you know him? I actually was around Danbury some in the early
                50's, then again in late 60's, so I knew the places he did, but had not heard
                of him.
                Scotty


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Russ Jenkins
                Thanks for sharing Scott. I ve had similar experiences. Russ Scott Mortensen wrote: My family and I had an interesting experience
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 4, 2007
                  Thanks for sharing Scott. I've had similar experiences.

                  Russ

                  Scott Mortensen <Scottkmort@...> wrote:
                  My family and I had an interesting experience today. I think Ives
                  would have appreciated it. Thought I might share with all of you.

                  My daughters are adopted from China, and we have many Chinese-American
                  friends. This Sunday, some friends invited us to attend their Chinese
                  Christian Church to celebrate the Chinese New Year.

                  The entire service was in both Chinese and English. Sometimes the
                  pastor would speak Chinese and another pastor would repeat the words in
                  English. Other times, the first words were English and then the other
                  pastor repeated them in Chinese.

                  But the fascinating thing was that we sang the hymns simultaneously --
                  in both Chinese and English. Very, very strange AND beautiful to hear
                  this. It sounded so familiar AND so foreign at the same time. When we
                  began singing "Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing," I found myself
                  choking up. Hard to explain. But it was profoundly moving and
                  transformative -- and this mixture of familiar and strange all wrapped
                  up in matters cosmic & spiritual immediately made me think of Ives.

                  After the service, my wife and I talked about the service. We both
                  agreed that Ives probably would have been bowled over, flattened,
                  inspired -- just like we were.

                  To all of you: Happy Chinese New Year!






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