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Popular and/or Great

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  • Christian Tucker
    ... Well, Copland had to work for a living for many years. He had a great skill at delivering what the customer wanted. That the works are easy to play and
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 10, 2003
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      > I offer music of Aaron Copland. AC
      > made a career in music and did work on his perception by the
      > public. Pieces like "Fanfare for the Common Man" and "A Lincoln
      > Portrait" seem to have an acknowledged prominence.


      Well, Copland had to work for a living for many years. He had a
      great skill at delivering what the customer wanted. That the works
      are easy to play and easy to understand speaks more to his commercial
      business success than anything else. Copland's "great"
      works, "Inscape" and "Connotations For Orchestra" are hardly warm,
      nostalgic and fuzzy ditty's!

      George Ives was much the same, but never had the financial success to
      do what older Copland and Charles Ives was able to do. That is to
      create for his inner muse.


      > Yes, in the case of Ives, there is a deep literary and
      philosophical
      > level that might be appreciated by a smaller number of listeners,


      There is almost no "pop" music in Ives cannon. "Country March" in
      all its incarnations is about his greatest hit. Many, many other
      composers had to do the commercial stuff in order to eat.

      > but I just find it too ironic that a composer like this, using
      tunes
      > and rough-n'ready band sounds so much, has become of interest only
      > to sophisticated <i>aficianados</i>.


      Beethoven used popular fragments in his work. I'd be very hard
      pressed to identify any of them. AND, it's getting pretty hard to
      identify those 1890's top forty tunes that Ives used. I'm sure if
      Ives had simply reset "Massa's Done Laid in the Cold, Cold Ground"
      that that argument would be stronger. But fragments, distortions and
      snatches aren't what excite the mouth breathers in the audience!

      I'm not really setting forth the contention that popular equals
      crap. Nor am I setting forth the contention that artists must suffer
      rejection to be great. I am suggesting that "greatness" might not be
      a "popular" or broad consensus. And that a small, passionate
      audience is ample.
    • Christian Tucker
      ... Sorry, forgot to sign. I got excited! Christian Tucker New York
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 10, 2003
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        --- In charlesives@yahoogroups.com, "Christian Tucker"


        Sorry, forgot to sign. I got excited!

        Christian Tucker
        New York
      • mhberest
        ... commercial ... You mighr include the Piano Quartet and Piano Fantasy in that number.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 11, 2005
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          > Well, Copland had to work for a living for many years. He had a
          > great skill at delivering what the customer wanted. That the works
          > are easy to play and easy to understand speaks more to his
          commercial
          > business success than anything else. Copland's "great"
          > works, "Inscape" and "Connotations For Orchestra" are hardly warm,
          > nostalgic and fuzzy ditty's!

          You mighr include the Piano Quartet and Piano Fantasy in that number.
        • Frank Camiola
          Subject: [charlesives] Re: Popular and/or Great ... Great pieces those are. So is the Orchestral Variations, Symphony No. 1 (Organ Symphony), Dance Symphony,
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 11, 2005
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            Subject: [charlesives] Re: Popular and/or Great


            >> Well, Copland had to work for a living for many years. He had a
            >> great skill at delivering what the customer wanted. That the works
            >> are easy to play and easy to understand speaks more to his
            > commercial
            >> business success than anything else. Copland's "great"
            >> works, "Inscape" and "Connotations For Orchestra" are hardly warm,
            >> nostalgic and fuzzy ditty's!
            >
            > You mighr include the Piano Quartet and Piano Fantasy in that number.

            Great pieces those are. So is the Orchestral Variations, Symphony No. 1
            (Organ Symphony), Dance Symphony, and one of my personal favorites - the
            Short Symphony (No. 2). On some warm sunny days driving here through the
            Hudson Valley, there is nothing that I would rather hear than some good 'ole
            Copland. "Copland The Modernist" with MTT/SFS is an ourageous disc if you've
            never heard it - one of my favorite Copland albums.

            Frankie
          • Frank Camiola
            ... BTW, on my agenda this summer (besides moving into our new house) is to take a pilgrimage to Copland s house (in Peekskill) and a trip to Danbury to see
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 11, 2005
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              >>> Well, Copland had to work for a living for many years. He had a
              >>> great skill at delivering what the customer wanted. That the works
              >>> are easy to play and easy to understand speaks more to his
              >> commercial
              >>> business success than anything else. Copland's "great"
              >>> works, "Inscape" and "Connotations For Orchestra" are hardly warm,
              >>> nostalgic and fuzzy ditty's!

              BTW, on my agenda this summer (besides moving into our new house) is to take
              a pilgrimage to Copland's house (in Peekskill) and a trip to Danbury to see
              all of the Ives stuff. Anybody been?

              Frankie
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