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Re: Three Places in New England Version 1

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  • mhberest
    ... Thompson was like Truman Capote without the drugs, neuroses, or taste in clothing. ... Is this the Burgess Meredith from Of Mice and Men, Batman,
    Message 1 of 26 , Aug 5, 2005
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      > Thompson was an old lady before he turned middle aged.

      Thompson was like Truman Capote without the drugs, neuroses, or taste
      in clothing.

      >
      > > Carter can think whatever he wants.
      > The rumor is that Burgess Meredith "died" because Carter got tired
      > of playing the double-role.

      Is this the Burgess Meredith from "Of Mice and Men," "Batman,"
      "Rocky," or "Grumpy Old Men"?

      Hmm, having written that out, it now seems obvious it was the last one.

      > Roy Harris finally made it to New York. He was wide-eyed awe-
      > struck -- never saw any city like that before in his whole life!
      > Her meets up with Copland and they're walking down the street
      > together, and some sailors are laughing at the pair of them. Harris
      > asks Copland, in all innocence, what they find so funny. Copland
      > replies (and this is a quote), "Haw haw, Roy, don't you know
      > anything?? I'm the biggest fairy in all of New York!" Then they
      > get to either Copland's or Thompson's apartment, and Harris thinks
      > to himself, "The way this place is decorated, and the music they
      > write, I'm glad I don't write music like that!"

      This surprises me because I never regarded Copland as particularly
      fey. No, he wasn't Rambo (Aaron Copland in "Rambo": an interesting
      image), but I didn't really begin to suspect anything until he was on
      a show plugging his autobiography and went apesh** when the
      interviewer asked him about why he wrote nothing about his personal
      life. (Copland going apesh**, another interesting image). Although
      obviously he was not on TV when with Harris, and Harris was a fellow
      artist, presumably not with the mindset of the religious right, it
      still surprises me a person as private as Copland would out himself
      with such ease.
    • mhberest
      ... Thank you. And I m also available to discuss atonality at Bar Mitzvahs. ... You mean Lyndon LaRouche was actually intelligent enough to know Webern was
      Message 2 of 26 , Aug 5, 2005
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        > The
        > > only thing that comes to mind is he would construct rows so that
        > the
        > > original form was the same as a transposed retrograde or retrograde
        > > inversion, but this, of course, lessened the possibilities,
        > instead of
        > > expanding upon them.
        >
        > Very good!

        Thank you. And I'm also available to discuss atonality at Bar Mitzvahs.

        > Have you read that hilarious piece of drivel written by Lyndon
        > LaRouche denouncing Webern's music because of these qualities? I
        > don't know where it originally came from (other than a jail cell?),
        > but it shows up in "Phatic Communication with Bob Dobbs."

        You mean Lyndon LaRouche was actually intelligent enough to know
        Webern was not someone who baked bread?!?!
      • davidgrayporter
        ... The Wonderous thing about Webern s bread is that you can eat a loaf forwards, backwards or upside-down and it tastes a little different each time.
        Message 3 of 26 , Aug 5, 2005
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          --- In charlesives@yahoogroups.com, "mhberest" <mhberest@m...> wrote:
          >
          > > Have you read that hilarious piece of drivel written by Lyndon
          > > LaRouche denouncing Webern's music because of these qualities? I
          > > don't know where it originally came from (other than a jail cell?),
          > > but it shows up in "Phatic Communication with Bob Dobbs."
          >
          > You mean Lyndon LaRouche was actually intelligent enough to know
          > Webern was not someone who baked bread?!?!

          The Wonderous thing about Webern's bread is that you can eat a loaf
          forwards, backwards or upside-down and it tastes a little different
          each time.
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