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hostility monitoring project

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  • _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE
    Hello fellow cyclists, I need your help with a research project. I am looking for volunteers to keep track of instances of hostility they experience on the
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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    Hello fellow cyclists,

     

    I need your help with a research project.

     

    I am looking for volunteers to keep track of instances of hostility they experience on the road this year.  Attached is an Excel worksheet that will make this easy.  You just fill it in, and send it to me at the end of the year, at markortizauto@....

     

    I have also attached my own completed worksheet for 2009, as an example.

     

    A few instructions:

    1. Start an e-mail message, addressed to me per above, which you will use at the end of the year to attach your spreadsheet to.  Save this in the drafts folder of your e-mail program.  As the year goes along, use this to make note of anything you think might influence the level of friendliness or hostility where you ride.  Examples would be broadcasts inciting hostility, large cycling events, high-profile crashes that attract public notice, PSA’s encouraging good road-sharing, education efforts of any kind – really anything you think might potentially be reflected in a change in the loggings on your spreadsheet.  Also note any conspicuous patterns in your observations.  For example, I only was told to get off the road two times the whole year in 2009, and they both occurred within a time span of less than 24 hours.  I’m interested in observations like that.
    2. Enter your road mileage in cell A8.  You can change this number as many times as you want.  I just want it to show your miles for the year when you send the worksheet to me.  The spreadsheet uses it to figure frequency of the various types of incidents you log, per 1000 miles ridden (column O).  Please do not count miles ridden off-road or in competition on roads closed to non-race traffic.  Extreme accuracy is not paramount, but be as accurate as you can.
    3. Be conservative.  That is, err on the side of presuming non-hostility, when there is reasonable doubt.  Log only instances you’re sure of.
    4. Log only incidents you personally experience, not ones you read of or hear of.
    5. If you are riding with another participant in this study, and an incident happens to both of you at once, you should both log it.
    6. If an incident includes two or more listed categories, log it as one of each of the applicable types.  For example, if somebody yells at you and throws something at you, log that as both a yell and a thrown object.
    7. “Buzzes” are cases where a motorist travelling the same direction deliberately passes really, really close – try to log one of these only when you are fairly sure it’s deliberate.
    8. “Threats” should include only definite ones, and contingent ones if they are contingent on your doing something you are legally entitled to do.  For example, “I will kill you” is a threat.  “I will kill you if I catch you riding here again” is a threat.  “You might find it safer not to ride here” would ordinarily not be a threat, unless you can clearly establish so by context.  Such a case should be explained in your cover e-mail.
    9. An “oncoming MV feint” is a case where an oncoming motorist swerves toward you, but does not come close enough to actually be likely to hit you – just tries to scare you.  Try to be sure they weren’t just avoiding something in the road, or dealing with a distraction in the vehicle.  If you’re really sure they were trying to actually hit you, log that as attempted murder.

     

    I do not expect to get a scientifically rigorous poll or survey here, nor highly accurate statistics.  What I am after is an initial effort that will reveal conspicuous patterns, such as clustering by geography or time.

     

    I realize cyclists in more densely populated areas will tend to report more incidents, simply because they encounter more traffic per mile.  I will try to informally take this into account, but I have not figured out any systematic way to correct for it statistically, so I won’t try to do that.

     

    I considered including a category for attempts to startle, but decided against that because those tend to be so numerous as to be burdensome to count, and many are just ill-considered playfulness by kids, as opposed to serious hostility.  There are so many borderline cases that I feared excessive “eye of the beholder” distortion of the results.

     

    I would like to continue to do this over a number of years.

     

    I want as many responses as possible.  Ideally, I would wish to have a fairly uniform geographical distribution, but I probably won’t get that, so I’m just going for raw quantity, and I’ll take what I can get.

     

    Please forward this message as you see fit.  It’s perfectly all right if I get responses at the end of the year from people I never heard of before.

     

    Thanks in advance for your help with this project.

     

     

    Mark Ortiz

  • fred
    I ve downloaded and saved your attachments for future use as you describe. Since I ve completed two LAB courses, my experiences with motorist interaction at a
    Message 2 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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      I've downloaded and saved your attachments for future use as you describe. Since I've completed two LAB courses, my experiences with motorist interaction at a negative level has dropped dramatically. I can't think of much more than a honk now and then, and perhaps zero verbal encounters.

      Is there a data field for the rider to note if he is a vehicular cyclist or a self-taught edge-of-the-road kind of rider?

      I think that's an important portion of your study.

      --- In chainguard@yahoogroups.com, "_ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE" <markortizauto@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello fellow cyclists,
      >
      >
      >
      > I need your help with a research project.
      >
    • Gary Crocker
      Interesting endeavor Mark. Will you be setting up online for input? Gary C. Crocker San Diego, CA 82degrees today! www.baufl.org info@baufl.org 1-619-445-0920
      Message 3 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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        Interesting endeavor Mark. Will you be setting up online for input?

        Gary C. Crocker
        San Diego, CA 82degrees today! 
        www.baufl.org
        info@...
        1-619-445-0920 Office
        1-619-445-0934 Fax
        1-619-787-9896 Mobile














        i'm EMAILING FOR THE GREATER GOOD
        Join me

         

        To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com; bicycledriving@...; ncata@...; bicycling_in_gso@yahoogroups.com
        CC: mionskelaw@...
        From: markortizauto@...
        Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2010 16:49:26 -0500
        Subject: [CG] hostility monitoring project [2 Attachments]

         
        [Attachment(s) from _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE included below]

        Hello fellow cyclists,

         

        I need your help with a research project.

         

        I am looking for volunteers to keep track of instances of hostility they experience on the road this year.  Attached is an Excel worksheet that will make this easy.  You just fill it in, and send it to me at the end of the year, at markortizauto@ windstream. net.

         

        I have also attached my own completed worksheet for 2009, as an example.

         

        A few instructions:

        1. Start an e-mail message, addressed to me per above, which you will use at the end of the year to attach your spreadsheet to.  Save this in the drafts folder of your e-mail program.  As the year goes along, use this to make note of anything you think might influence the level of friendliness or hostility where you ride.  Examples would be broadcasts inciting hostility, large cycling events, high-profile crashes that attract public notice, PSA’s encouraging good road-sharing, education efforts of any kind – really anything you think might potentially be reflected in a change in the loggings on your spreadsheet.  Also note any conspicuous patterns in your observations.  For example, I only was told to get off the road two times the whole year in 2009, and they both occurred within a time span of less than 24 hours.  I’m interested in observations like that.
        2. Enter your road mileage in cell A8.  You can change this number as many times as you want.  I just want it to show your miles for the year when you send the worksheet to me.  The spreadsheet uses it to figure frequency of the various types of incidents you log, per 1000 miles ridden (column O).  Please do not count miles ridden off-road or in competition on roads closed to non-race traffic.  Extreme accuracy is not paramount, but be as accurate as you can.
        3. Be conservative.  That is, err on the side of presuming non-hostility, when there is reasonable doubt.  Log only instances you’re sure of.
        4. Log only incidents you personally experience, not ones you read of or hear of.
        5. If you are riding with another participant in this study, and an incident happens to both of you at once, you should both log it.
        6. If an incident includes two or more listed categories, log it as one of each of the applicable types.  For example, if somebody yells at you and throws something at you, log that as both a yell and a thrown object.
        7. “Buzzes” are cases where a motorist travelling the same direction deliberately passes really, really close – try to log one of these only when you are fairly sure it’s deliberate.
        8. “Threats” should include only definite ones, and contingent ones if they are contingent on your doing something you are legally entitled to do.  For example, “I will kill you” is a threat.  “I will kill you if I catch you riding here again” is a threat.  “You might find it safer not to ride here” would ordinarily not be a threat, unless you can clearly establish so by context.  Such a case should be explained in your cover e-mail.
        9. An “oncoming MV feint” is a case where an oncoming motorist swerves toward you, but does not come close enough to actually be likely to hit you – just tries to scare you.  Try to be sure they weren’t just avoiding something in the road, or dealing with a distraction in the vehicle.  If you’re really sure they were trying to actually hit you, log that as attempted murder.

         

        I do not expect to get a scientifically rigorous poll or survey here, nor highly accurate statistics.  What I am after is an initial effort that will reveal conspicuous patterns, such as clustering by geography or time.

         

        I realize cyclists in more densely populated areas will tend to report more incidents, simply because they encounter more traffic per mile.  I will try to informally take this into account, but I have not figured out any systematic way to correct for it statistically, so I won’t try to do that.

         

        I considered including a category for attempts to startle, but decided against that because those tend to be so numerous as to be burdensome to count, and many are just ill-considered playfulness by kids, as opposed to serious hostility.  There are so many borderline cases that I feared excessive “eye of the beholder” distortion of the results.

         

        I would like to continue to do this over a number of years.

         

        I want as many responses as possible.  Ideally, I would wish to have a fairly uniform geographical distribution, but I probably won’t get that, so I’m just going for raw quantity, and I’ll take what I can get.

         

        Please forward this message as you see fit.  It’s perfectly all right if I get responses at the end of the year from people I never heard of before.

         

        Thanks in advance for your help with this project.

         

         

        Mark Ortiz


      • Bob Shanteau
        ... Dan Gutierrez and Brian DeSousa have coined the terms integrated, separated and segregated behavior to describe vehicular cycling, edge-of-the-road
        Message 4 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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          fred wrote:
          > I've downloaded and saved your attachments for future use as you describe. Since I've completed two LAB courses, my experiences with motorist interaction at a negative level has dropped dramatically. I can't think of much more than a honk now and then, and perhaps zero verbal encounters.
          >
          > Is there a data field for the rider to note if he is a vehicular cyclist or a self-taught edge-of-the-road kind of rider?
          >
          > I think that's an important portion of your study.

          Dan Gutierrez and Brian DeSousa have coined the terms integrated,
          separated and segregated behavior to describe vehicular cycling,
          edge-of-the-road cycling, and sidewalk or path cycling, respectively
          <http://www.cyclistview.com/ITC-Intro/index.htm>.

          Bob Shanteau
        • Serge Issakov
          Good point, Fred. Expanding on that a bit, I would ask questions like the following. It would be interesting to see how unwelcome interactions correlate
          Message 5 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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            Good point, Fred.   Expanding on that a bit, I would ask questions like the following.  It would be interesting to see how unwelcome interactions correlate with answers to these questions.

            1) How do you deal with cars parked at the curb?

            a) I just ride where it's safe and out of the way of traffic - they are responsible to look before they open their doors.
            b) I try to ride about 3 feet from parked cars and look for warning signs about a door that might be opened.
            c) I ride at least 5 feet from parked cars.
            d) Other: ____________

            2) What do you think of people that park in bike lanes?

            a) They should be heavily fined and possibly jailed - they're creating a dangerous hazard.
            b) They should get a typical parking fine.
            c) No big deal.
            d) I want to thank them.

            3) When a few (say 5 or less in a row) cars are stopped at a red light, I usually ...

            a) ... pass them on the right and stop in front of the first car.
            b) ... pass them on the right and stop in front and  to the right of the first car.
            c) ... pass them on the left if possible, otherwise on the right, and stop in front of the first car.
            d) ... pass them on the right and stop behind the first car.
            e) ... pass them on the right and stop behind and to the right of the first car.
            f) ... pass them on the left if possible, otherwise on the right, and stop behind the first car.
            g) ... pass them on the left if possible, otherwise on the right, and stop behind and to the right of the first car.
            h) ... stop behind the last car near the center of the lane.

            4) When many cars, more than can probably make it through on the next green, are stopped at a red light, I usually ...

            a) ... pass them on the right and stop in front of the first car.
            b) ... pass them on the right and stop in front and to the right of the first car.
            c) ... pass them on the left if possible, otherwise on the right, and stop in front of the first car.
            d) ... pass them on the right and stop behind the first car.
            e) ... pass them on the right and stop behind and to the right of the first car.
            f) ... pass them on the left if possible, otherwise on the right, and stop behind the first car.
            g) ... pass them on the left if possible, otherwise on the right, and stop behind and to the right of the first car.
            h) ... stop behind the last car near the center of the lane.

            5) How do you feel about bike lanes?

            a) Love 'em
            b) Hate 'em
            c) Like the well-designed ones, not the poorly designed ones.
            d) Don't care much either way.

            6) What's a bigger problem in our society?

            a) Lack of good bicycling facilities.
            b) Anti-bike laws.

            7) Which do you prefer on a road with multiple lanes in your direction and a speed limit of 35 mph?

            a) bike lanes
            b) narrow outside lane (10-12' wide), no bike lane
            c) wide outside lane (14-16' wide) , no bike lane

            8) How do you feel about right turning motorists who drive in the bike lane?

            a) Bastards!
            b) I want to thank them.

            9) Would you favor an "Idaho stop" law that allows bicyclists to treat stop signs as yield signs?

            a) Yes
            b) No

            10) Which of the following is the biggest factor in determining a bicyclist's safety?

            a) The behavior of motorists.
            b) The bicyclist's behavior.
            c) Road surface conditions.
            c) Luck

            Serge


            On Fri, Jan 8, 2010 at 2:16 PM, fred <fred_dot_u@...> wrote:
             

            I've downloaded and saved your attachments for future use as you describe. Since I've completed two LAB courses, my experiences with motorist interaction at a negative level has dropped dramatically. I can't think of much more than a honk now and then, and perhaps zero verbal encounters.

            Is there a data field for the rider to note if he is a vehicular cyclist or a self-taught edge-of-the-road kind of rider?

            I think that's an important portion of your study.



            --- In chainguard@yahoogroups.com, "_ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE" <markortizauto@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello fellow cyclists,
            >
            >
            >
            > I need your help with a research project.
            >


          • _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE
            Since I ve already sent out the worksheets, I m not going to make any changes, at least until next year. You are welcome to make any comments such as you
            Message 6 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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              Since I’ve already sent out the worksheets, I’m not going to make any changes, at least until next year.

               

              You are welcome to make any comments such as you suggest in the cover message.

               

              When did you take the courses, and where do you live and ride?

               

               

              Mark Ortiz

               

              -----Original Message-----
              From: chainguard@yahoogroups.com [mailto: chainguard@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of fred
              Sent: Friday, January 08, 2010 5:16 PM
              To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [CG] Re: hostility monitoring project

               

              I've downloaded and saved your attachments for future use as you describe. Since I've completed two LAB courses, my experiences with motorist interaction at a negative level has dropped dramatically. I can't think of much more than a honk now and then, and perhaps zero verbal encounters.

               

              Is there a data field for the rider to note if he is a vehicular cyclist or a self-taught edge-of-the-road kind of rider?

               

              I think that's an important portion of your study.

               

            • Serge Issakov
              I agree with Gary. An online system would be much more effective. Then you could see how people are progressing in terms of using the system, send out
              Message 7 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                I agree with Gary.  An online system would be much more effective.  Then you could see how people are progressing in terms of using the system, send out reminders, etc.
                Seem kind of reward/contest associated with participation would help too.

                Good luck, but I don't think you'll get much data with the current approach.

                Serge


                On Fri, Jan 8, 2010 at 3:27 PM, _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE <markortizauto@...> wrote:
                 

                Since I’ve already sent out the worksheets, I’m not going to make any changes, at least until next year.

                 

                You are welcome to make any comments such as you suggest in the cover message.

                 

                When did you take the courses, and where do you live and ride?

                 

                 

                Mark Ortiz

                 

                -----Original Message-----
                From: chainguard@yahoogroups.com [mailto:chainguard@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of fred
                Sent: Friday, January 08, 2010 5:16 PM
                To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [CG] Re: hostility monitoring project

                 

                I've downloaded and saved your attachments for future use as you describe. Since I've completed two LAB courses, my experiences with motorist interaction at a negative level has dropped dramatically. I can't think of much more than a honk now and then, and perhaps zero verbal encounters.

                 

                Is there a data field for the rider to note if he is a vehicular cyclist or a self-taught edge-of-the-road kind of rider?

                 

                I think that's an important portion of your study.

                 


              • fred
                I m in Florida, took the first course, Traffic Skills 101, in Clearwater, and the second, LCI seminar in Orlando. I live and ride in eastern Volusia County, in
                Message 8 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                  I'm in Florida, took the first course, Traffic Skills 101, in Clearwater, and the second, LCI seminar in Orlando. I live and ride in eastern Volusia County, in and about Daytona Beach.

                  I'm not a web design wizard, and didn't stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night, but I would also agree that some form of online log would make things easier and therefore perhaps more complete. I log my daily rides at Bike Journal so a few more clicks at the same time would be no big deal.

                  Opening the worksheet and entering any unique, relevant information would be no big deal either, especially since you've indicated that it's an end-of-year transmission, or did I misread that part? Should the sheet be sent out each time an incident is experienced?


                  --- In chainguard@yahoogroups.com, "_ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE" <markortizauto@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Since I've already sent out the worksheets, I'm not going to make any
                  > changes, at least until next year.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > You are welcome to make any comments such as you suggest in the cover
                  > message.

                • fred
                  I very much prefer those terms and have read them in the past. My memory isn t what it once was, but I ll try to put those into the forward storage bay.
                  Message 9 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                    I very much prefer those terms and have read them in the past. My memory
                    isn't what it once was, but I'll try to put those into the forward
                    storage bay. "Integrated" works better in general conversation overall,
                    I think.

                    --- In chainguard@yahoogroups.com, Bob Shanteau <RMShant@...> wrote:

                    > Dan Gutierrez and Brian DeSousa have coined the terms integrated,
                    > separated and segregated behavior to describe vehicular cycling,
                    > edge-of-the-road cycling, and sidewalk or path cycling, respectively
                    > <http://www.cyclistview.com/ITC-Intro/index.htm>.
                    >
                    > Bob Shanteau
                    >
                  • _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE
                    You mean start a website? No. There are enough listservs and forums, I think. I just want a modest study, not an unpaid full-time job. Mark Ortiz Kannapolis,
                    Message 10 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                      You mean start a website?

                       

                      No.  There are enough listservs and forums, I think.  I just want a modest study, not an unpaid full-time job.

                       

                      Mark Ortiz

                      Kannapolis, NC high of 32 today, presently about 27

                       


                      From: chainguard@yahoogroups.com [mailto: chainguard@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Gary Crocker
                      Sent: Friday, January 08, 2010 5:52 PM
                      To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [CG] hostility monitoring project

                       



                      Interesting endeavor Mark. Will you be setting up online for input?

                      Gary C. Crocker
                      San Diego , CA 82degrees today! 
                      www.baufl.org
                      info@...
                      1-619-445-0920 Office
                      1-619-445-0934 Fax
                      1-619-787-9896 Mobile













                      i'mEMAILING FOR THE GREATER GOOD
                      Join me


                       


                      To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com ; bicycledriving@...; ncata@...; bicycling_in_gso@yahoogroups.com
                      CC: mionskelaw@...
                      From: markortizauto@...
                      Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2010 16:49:26 -0500
                      Subject: [CG] hostility monitoring project [2 Attachments]

                       

                      [Attachment(s) from _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE included below]

                      Hello fellow cyclists,

                       

                      I need your help with a research project.

                       

                      I am looking for volunteers to keep track of instances of hostility they experience on the road this year.  Attached is an Excel worksheet that will make this easy.  You just fill it in, and send it to me at the end of the year, at markortizauto@ windstream. net.

                       

                      I have also attached my own completed worksheet for 2009, as an example.

                       

                      A few instructions:

                      1. Start an e-mail message, addressed to me per above, which you will use at the end of the year to attach your spreadsheet to.  Save this in the drafts folder of your e-mail program.  As the year goes along, use this to make note of anything you think might influence the level of friendliness or hostility where you ride.  Examples would be broadcasts inciting hostility, large cycling events, high-profile crashes that attract public notice, PSA’s encouraging good road-sharing, education efforts of any kind – really anything you think might potentially be reflected in a change in the loggings on your spreadsheet.  Also note any conspicuous patterns in your observations.  For example, I only was told to get off the road two times the whole year in 2009, and they both occurred within a time span of less than 24 hours.  I’m interested in observations like that.
                      2. Enter your road mileage in cell A8.  You can change this number as many times as you want.  I just want it to show your miles for the year when you send the worksheet to me.  The spreadsheet uses it to figure frequency of the various types of incidents you log, per 1000 miles ridden (column O).  Please do not count miles ridden off-road or in competition on roads closed to non-race traffic.  Extreme accuracy is not paramount, but be as accurate as you can.
                      3. Be conservative.  That is, err on the side of presuming non-hostility, when there is reasonable doubt.  Log only instances you’re sure of.
                      4. Log only incidents you personally experience, not ones you read of or hear of.
                      5. If you are riding with another participant in this study, and an incident happens to both of you at once, you should both log it.
                      6. If an incident includes two or more listed categories, log it as one of each of the applicable types.  For example, if somebody yells at you and throws something at you, log that as both a yell and a thrown object.
                      7. “Buzzes” are cases where a motorist travelling the same direction deliberately passes really, really close – try to log one of these only when you are fairly sure it’s deliberate.
                      8. “Threats” should include only definite ones, and contingent ones if they are contingent on your doing something you are legally entitled to do.  For example, “I will kill you” is a threat.  “I will kill you if I catch you riding here again” is a threat.  “You might find it safer not to ride here” would ordinarily not be a threat, unless you can clearly establish so by context.  Such a case should be explained in your cover e-mail.
                      9. An “oncoming MV feint” is a case where an oncoming motorist swerves toward you, but does not come close enough to actually be likely to hit you – just tries to scare you.  Try to be sure they weren’t just avoiding something in the road, or dealing with a distraction in the vehicle.  If you’re really sure they were trying to actually hit you, log that as attempted murder.

                       

                      I do not expect to get a scientifically rigorous poll or survey here, nor highly accurate statistics.  What I am after is an initial effort that will reveal conspicuous patterns, such as clustering by geography or time.

                       

                      I realize cyclists in more densely populated areas will tend to report more incidents, simply because they encounter more traffic per mile.  I will try to informally take this into account, but I have not figured out any systematic way to correct for it statistically, so I won’t try to do that.

                       

                      I considered including a category for attempts to startle, but decided against that because those tend to be so numerous as to be burdensome to count, and many are just ill-considered playfulness by kids, as opposed to serious hostility.  There are so many borderline cases that I feared excessive “eye of the beholder” distortion of the results.

                       

                      I would like to continue to do this over a number of years.

                       

                      I want as many responses as possible.  Ideally, I would wish to have a fairly uniform geographical distribution, but I probably won’t get that, so I’m just going for raw quantity, and I’ll take what I can get.

                       

                      Please forward this message as you see fit.  It’s perfectly all right if I get responses at the end of the year from people I never heard of before.

                       

                      Thanks in advance for your help with this project.

                       

                       

                      Mark Ortiz

                       


                    • _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE
                      Just want it once at the end of the year, thanks. It s set up so you enter a total for each category for each month, and the spreadsheet does the rest. You
                      Message 11 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                        Just want it once at the end of the year, thanks.

                         

                        It’s set up so you enter a total for each category for each month, and the spreadsheet does the rest.  You can either keep track mentally for the month, or just enter 1 when the first one happens and then delete that and enter 2 if you have another that month, and so on.

                         

                        Same with the miles, except I’m just asking for the total for the year.  You can keep rolling it as you go, or just keep track some other way and enter it at the end of the year.  If you keep entering up-to-date mileage as you go, your “per kMile” numbers will be current, but it’s up to you whether you find that interesting.

                         

                        When did you take the courses?

                         

                         

                        Mark Ortiz

                         


                        From: chainguard@yahoogroups.com [mailto: chainguard@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of fred
                        Sent: Friday, January 08, 2010 7:27 PM
                        To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [CG] Re: hostility monitoring project

                         



                        I'm in Florida , took the first course, Traffic Skills 101, in Clearwater , and the second, LCI seminar in Orlando . I live and ride in eastern Volusia County , in and about Daytona Beach .

                        I'm not a web design wizard, and didn't stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night, but I would also agree that some form of online log would make things easier and therefore perhaps more complete. I log my daily rides at Bike Journal so a few more clicks at the same time would be no big deal.

                        Opening the worksheet and entering any unique, relevant information would be no big deal either, especially since you've indicated that it's an end-of-year transmission, or did I misread that part? Should the sheet be sent out each time an incident is experienced?


                        --- In chainguard@yahoogroups.com , "_ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE" <markortizauto@...> wrote:

                        >
                        > Since I've already sent out the worksheets, I'm not going to make any
                        > changes, at least until next year.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > You are welcome to make any comments such as you suggest in the cover
                        > message.


                      • Ed Wagner
                        Mark Would you mind if I published this in the Examiner? I d have to include your contact information. Ed Wagner Tulsa Alternative Transportation Examiner
                        Message 12 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                          Mark

                          Would you mind if I published this in the Examiner?  I'd have to include your contact information.

                          Ed Wagner
                          Tulsa Alternative Transportation Examiner

                          _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE wrote:
                           

                          Hello fellow cyclists,

                           

                          I need your help with a research project.

                           

                          I am looking for volunteers to keep track of instances of hostility they experience on the road this year.  Attached is an Excel worksheet that will make this easy.  You just fill it in, and send it to me at the end of the year, at markortizauto@ windstream. net.

                           

                          I have also attached my own completed worksheet for 2009, as an example.

                           

                          A few instructions:

                          1. Start an e-mail message, addressed to me per above, which you will use at the end of the year to attach your spreadsheet to.  Save this in the drafts folder of your e-mail program.  As the year goes along, use this to make note of anything you think might influence the level of friendliness or hostility where you ride.  Examples would be broadcasts inciting hostility, large cycling events, high-profile crashes that attract public notice, PSA’s encouraging good road-sharing, education efforts of any kind – really anything you think might potentially be reflected in a change in the loggings on your spreadsheet.  Also note any conspicuous patterns in your observations.  For example, I only was told to get off the road two times the whole year in 2009, and they both occurred within a time span of less than 24 hours.  I’m interested in observations like that.
                          2. Enter your road mileage in cell A8.  You can change this number as many times as you want.  I just want it to show your miles for the year when you send the worksheet to me.  The spreadsheet uses it to figure frequency of the various types of incidents you log, per 1000 miles ridden (column O).  Please do not count miles ridden off-road or in competition on roads closed to non-race traffic.  Extreme accuracy is not paramount, but be as accurate as you can.
                          3. Be conservative.  That is, err on the side of presuming non-hostility, when there is reasonable doubt.  Log only instances you’re sure of.
                          4. Log only incidents you personally experience, not ones you read of or hear of.
                          5. If you are riding with another participant in this study, and an incident happens to both of you at once, you should both log it.
                          6. If an incident includes two or more listed categories, log it as one of each of the applicable types.  For example, if somebody yells at you and throws something at you, log that as both a yell and a thrown object.
                          7. “Buzzes” are cases where a motorist travelling the same direction deliberately passes really, really close – try to log one of these only when you are fairly sure it’s deliberate.
                          8. “Threats” should include only definite ones, and contingent ones if they are contingent on your doing something you are legally entitled to do.  For example, “I will kill you” is a threat.  “I will kill you if I catch you riding here again” is a threat.  “You might find it safer not to ride here” would ordinarily not be a threat, unless you can clearly establish so by context.  Such a case should be explained in your cover e-mail.
                          9. An “oncoming MV feint” is a case where an oncoming motorist swerves toward you, but does not come close enough to actually be likely to hit you – just tries to scare you.  Try to be sure they weren’t just avoiding something in the road, or dealing with a distraction in the vehicle.  If you’re really sure they were trying to actually hit you, log that as attempted murder.

                           

                          I do not expect to get a scientifically rigorous poll or survey here, nor highly accurate statistics.  What I am after is an initial effort that will reveal conspicuous patterns, such as clustering by geography or time.

                           

                          I realize cyclists in more densely populated areas will tend to report more incidents, simply because they encounter more traffic per mile.  I will try to informally take this into account, but I have not figured out any systematic way to correct for it statistically, so I won’t try to do that.

                           

                          I considered including a category for attempts to startle, but decided against that because those tend to be so numerous as to be burdensome to count, and many are just ill-considered playfulness by kids, as opposed to serious hostility.  There are so many borderline cases that I feared excessive “eye of the beholder” distortion of the results.

                           

                          I would like to continue to do this over a number of years.

                           

                          I want as many responses as possible.  Ideally, I would wish to have a fairly uniform geographical distribution, but I probably won’t get that, so I’m just going for raw quantity, and I’ll take what I can get.

                           

                          Please forward this message as you see fit.  It’s perfectly all right if I get responses at the end of the year from people I never heard of before.

                           

                          Thanks in advance for your help with this project.

                           

                           

                          Mark Ortiz

                        • fred
                          March 2008 for the TS101 and April 2009 for the LCI class. I m a certificated but not practicing LCI, as other issues prevent me from teaching in any manner
                          Message 13 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                            March 2008 for the TS101 and April 2009 for the LCI class. I'm a
                            certificated but not practicing LCI, as other issues prevent me from
                            teaching in any manner approaching effectiveness.

                            --- In chainguard@yahoogroups.com, "_ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE"
                            <markortizauto@...> wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            > When did you take the courses?
                            >
                          • _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE
                            That would be okay, Ed. Mark Ortiz _____ From: chainguard@yahoogroups.com [mailto:chainguard@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ed Wagner Sent: Friday, January 08,
                            Message 14 of 14 , Jan 8, 2010
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                              That would be okay, Ed.

                               

                              Mark Ortiz

                               


                              From: chainguard@yahoogroups.com [mailto: chainguard@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ed Wagner
                              Sent: Friday, January 08, 2010 8:21 PM
                              To: chainguard@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [CG] hostility monitoring project

                               



                              Mark

                              Would you mind if I published this in the Examiner?  I'd have to include your contact information.

                              Ed Wagner
                              Tulsa Alternative Transportation Examiner

                              _ MARK ORTIZ AUTOMOTIVE wrote:

                               

                              Hello fellow cyclists,

                               

                              I need your help with a research project.

                               

                              I am looking for volunteers to keep track of instances of hostility they experience on the road this year.  Attached is an Excel worksheet that will make this easy.  You just fill it in, and send it to me at the end of the year, at markortizauto@ windstream. net.

                               

                              I have also attached my own completed worksheet for 2009, as an example.

                               

                              A few instructions:

                              1. Start an e-mail message, addressed to me per above, which you will use at the end of the year to attach your spreadsheet to.  Save this in the drafts folder of your e-mail program.  As the year goes along, use this to make note of anything you think might influence the level of friendliness or hostility where you ride.  Examples would be broadcasts inciting hostility, large cycling events, high-profile crashes that attract public notice, PSA’s encouraging good road-sharing, education efforts of any kind – really anything you think might potentially be reflected in a change in the loggings on your spreadsheet.  Also note any conspicuous patterns in your observations.  For example, I only was told to get off the road two times the whole year in 2009, and they both occurred within a time span of less than 24 hours.  I’m interested in observations like that.
                              2. Enter your road mileage in cell A8.  You can change this number as many times as you want.  I just want it to show your miles for the year when you send the worksheet to me.  The spreadsheet uses it to figure frequency of the various types of incidents you log, per 1000 miles ridden (column O).  Please do not count miles ridden off-road or in competition on roads closed to non-race traffic.  Extreme accuracy is not paramount, but be as accurate as you can.
                              3. Be conservative.  That is, err on the side of presuming non-hostility, when there is reasonable doubt.  Log only instances you’re sure of.
                              4. Log only incidents you personally experience, not ones you read of or hear of.
                              5. If you are riding with another participant in this study, and an incident happens to both of you at once, you should both log it.
                              6. If an incident includes two or more listed categories, log it as one of each of the applicable types.  For example, if somebody yells at you and throws something at you, log that as both a yell and a thrown object.
                              7. “Buzzes” are cases where a motorist travelling the same direction deliberately passes really, really close – try to log one of these only when you are fairly sure it’s deliberate.
                              8. “Threats” should include only definite ones, and contingent ones if they are contingent on your doing something you are legally entitled to do.  For example, “I will kill you” is a threat.  “I will kill you if I catch you riding here again” is a threat.  “You might find it safer not to ride here” would ordinarily not be a threat, unless you can clearly establish so by context.  Such a case should be explained in your cover e-mail.
                              9. An “oncoming MV feint” is a case where an oncoming motorist swerves toward you, but does not come close enough to actually be likely to hit you – just tries to scare you.  Try to be sure they weren’t just avoiding something in the road, or dealing with a distraction in the vehicle.  If you’re really sure they were trying to actually hit you, log that as attempted murder.

                               

                              I do not expect to get a scientifically rigorous poll or survey here, nor highly accurate statistics.  What I am after is an initial effort that will reveal conspicuous patterns, such as clustering by geography or time.

                               

                              I realize cyclists in more densely populated areas will tend to report more incidents, simply because they encounter more traffic per mile.  I will try to informally take this into account, but I have not figured out any systematic way to correct for it statistically, so I won’t try to do that.

                               

                              I considered including a category for attempts to startle, but decided against that because those tend to be so numerous as to be burdensome to count, and many are just ill-considered playfulness by kids, as opposed to serious hostility.  There are so many borderline cases that I feared excessive “eye of the beholder” distortion of the results.

                               

                              I would like to continue to do this over a number of years.

                               

                              I want as many responses as possible.  Ideally, I would wish to have a fairly uniform geographical distribution, but I probably won’t get that, so I’m just going for raw quantity, and I’ll take what I can get.

                               

                              Please forward this message as you see fit.  It’s perfectly all right if I get responses at the end of the year from people I never heard of before.

                               

                              Thanks in advance for your help with this project.

                               

                               

                              Mark Ortiz


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