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Newsletter May 2004

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  • Amy Hedrick
    Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society News & Reviews 1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566 May 2004 29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at
    Message 1 of 6 , May 1, 2004
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      Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society

       


      News & Reviews


       
      1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566

      May 2004

       

      29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the College Place United Methodist Church on Altama Avenue.

      At this meeting we would like for you to pick one person or family that you are having trouble with in your research, make a list of records you have checked, and what your obstacles and goals are.

      Or, you can share your never fail research or computer tip that helps you overcome those brick walls. This meeting will be learning while you teach. You are teaching us about your family, and you may learn some interesting tips!

      18 APRIL 2004 Guest speaker Patricia Barefoot lectured on her family research of the Burney family and other families along the Old Post Road that runs between Glynn & Wayne Counties. One of her goals is to find the final resting place of James Stafford. According to an early 1800s map, Margaret Davis Cate marked the gravesite, which today would be located at what is known as the Burney/Popwell Cemetery. His grave has yet to be found.

       

      The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive

      Did you, your father, grandfather, uncles, cousins, etc. serve during World War II? Ever wonder exactly what they lived through?

      The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive, or TARA, was besieged by viewers the day before its grand release on the internet. Over 500, 000 hits were recorded in a two hour period, and due to such a massive amount of viewers, the site has been taken down to be redesigned. But some photos are still viewable at other sites until the new TARA site is operational.

      So what is TARA? This archive is dedicated to over 5 million reconnaissance photos taken by allied pilots during World War II. These photos are of bombed cities, concentration camps, battles in progress, and other aspects of war. One feature photo is of D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on Omaha Beach.

      During World War II photographic reconnaissance played a major part in the intelligence war. The advanced photographic techniques developed gave intelligence officers the ability to view the enemy's activities in 3D, and make highly accurate assessments.

      Other photos show the aftermath of battle, the ruined towns and cities. Recently TARA has been used to find “duds” dropped during the war so that they can be safely detonated by bomb disposal agencies. These aerial photos have also been used in the making of motion pictures. You can purchase some photos at 50% off the normal listed price right now.

      The site is located at

      www.evidenceincamera.co.uk As of right now, the site is still down until they can better handle the massive hits to the site.

       

      Revolutionary War Patriots of Glynn County

      At our last meeting, Bill Ramsaur of the Marshes of Glynn Chapter S.A.R. brought to light 17 patriots of the Revolutionary War, who either settled in Glynn County, were from this area, or were buried here.

      The goal of our local S.A.R. is to find these patriot gravesites, and honor those that have not been identified as a patriot with a military memorial marker.

      Several have been located already, those include:

      William Page [1764-1827]; Cyrus Dart [1764-1817]; Samuel Wright [1738-1804]; Robert Grant [1762-1843]; William Harris [1740-1792]; John Blackstock [1758-1797] all presumable buried in Christ Church.

      Others are William MacIntosh [1725-1801] buried on his home land of St. Clair on St. Simons Island. Benjamin Hart & Nancy Hart. Benjamin is rumored to be buried in Brunswick, most likely under the Glynn Middle School. His wife, Nancy, was buried in Kentucky. Christopher Hillary [1755-1796], one of the few that may have actually been from Glynn County before enlisting.

      Patriot graves that have not been located include:

      John Cutler Braddock [1743-1794]

      Thomas Cater [1751-1800]

      Frederick Lamb [1765-1808]

      Robert Lithgow [1758-1802]

      William Manning [1763-1810]

      George Purvis [1755-1805]

      Thomas E. Stone [1734-1806]

      John Tompkins [1745-1791]

      Your editor’s theory on three of these men are, one, John Tompkins may either be buried on his home site, which is now located off of Hwy. 99 in Glynn County, or in another county or state. Early records indicate that there was a fort out on the Turtle River, known as Tompkins Fort. A horrible battle between the family and Indians, resulted in a few casualties. The skirmish was so loud, that folks on St. Simons Island heard it and came to the rescue. He may be buried at this old home site, or somewhere else. Margaret Davis Cate’s notes on Tompkins Fort suggests that either he died around 1791 or removed from the county.

      Frederick Lamb could also be buried on his homeland, which would now be the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. Not only was the Lamb family cemetery here, it was rumored that over 600 slave burials were located. Many were moved to Freedman’s Cemetery or to the Greenwood Cemetery. As for the Lamb family, they were moved to Palmetto Cemetery. Frederick Lamb could still be out there.

      Lastly, according to records of Tara Fields, who maintains “The Crypt” a site dedicated to Camden & Charlton County History, Thomas Cater may be buried in Camden County, grave location unknown.

      Also during our meeting, Ms. Barefoot touched on the subject of the Manning family, and produced a deed showing the location of the Burney/Popwell Cemetery, and one of the neighbors being Manning, and some Mannings are buried within this cemetery.

      Or could they be one amongst the 800 gravesites, marked and unmarked at Midway Cemetery in Liberty County? Or perhaps at Sunbury? We may never know.

      If one of these men is you ancestor, the S.A.R. asks your help in providing more family information, and possible sites for their burials. Maybe you know of an old home place, or an out of the way cemetery. Maybe you know that they were buried in another, town, county, or state altogether. Whatever the information, it will help with honoring your patriot ancestor of Glynn County, Georgia.

       

      THE BRICK WALL

      Since only a few of us have contributed to the brick wall section, I though that this time I might add some tips in hurtling your brick wall, or at least chipping away some stones.

      When starting out in our genealogical research, many of us stick to what is known, that being family information [i.e. bibles, photos, documents], census, military records, newspapers, court documents, or any other public record available.

      But are you getting the most out of these searches? Member Jerry Martin stresses to us not to limit your search for your ancestor by just looking for him/her or his/her parents, but look into those siblings and neighbors.

      On my Hedrick family, I have found many more siblings to my great-great-grandfather by locating estate records of his siblings that were known. These siblings may also have title to the old home place, where family cemetery was located. One of the biggest aids to my Hedrick research were not even siblings, but cousins. They provided the most history, since their family was researched more, and they were in more public records than my own.

      Take the path least traveled, you never know where it may lead.

      There are other records that are most often overlooked by researchers. Two of the more morbid and often overlooked are coroner records and funeral home records. Coroner records may not exist, but some early records do. Finding them can be an exasperating job, but the end results could be a goldmine of information. Coroners recorded next of kin, who identified the body, cause of death, health of the person up to their death, and more.

      Also, if you ancestor was murdered, there may not be a court record, especially if it was a self defense murder, or a crime of passion.

      Usually only a coroner’s inquest was held, which will shed light on the manner in which your ancestor was murdered and who was involved. Was a witness possibly the missing link to your family tree? Was the suspect found guilty or innocent? Who was the suspect?

      Funeral home records are another resource that can provide birth dates, next of kin, spouses, and what helps me in my Glynn County research, where are these folks buried? Funeral homes provide the information for obits and death records, they may have more than what was printed. Especially if you ancestor’s death was questionable. And even though it’s not always correct information, the family are the ones who provide the genealogical tidbits for the funeral home records.

      Church records are usually never thought of in researching family history. Just recently I have taken on the endeavor of transcribing some these records. One of the first comments made by a researcher is, “I didn’t know he/she was part of this church!” Well of course not, you weren’t alive in 1867. Sometimes, with many families, they changed their beliefs to suit their needs. Many heads of families went to different congregations because they may be feuding with another family that attends the church, or they don’t get their way in a church matter.

      These records can show births, deaths, marriages, family units, where a person was from, what religion they were previously, and so much more.

      The downside to these records is that many churches won’t let you view these records, or the previous minister, pastor, father, rector, whomever, took the records with them when they resigned. Or they were never kept. Some of the records down south, of course, were destroyed during the War Between the States. Use your geography skills, and see if a church is still standing in your ancestor’s home town, you never know where it may lead.

      These are only a few of the many resources overlooked by most of us. In the newsletters to come, I will share some more hammers to use when breaking down a wall.

       

      INTERNET

      http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_phs.htm The Presbyterian Historical Society. Founded in 1852 to "preserve and service materials relating to the history of the Presbyterian Church," the Society's library contains over 200,000 volumes and 20,000,000 manuscripts. In addition to the library, the building houses the Society's archives, a museum, and numerous portraits of key Presbyterian historic figures. You can make queries, but you have to be very specific, plus you either have to go onsite to view the record, or have a professional do the work for you.

      http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/maps/ The USGenWeb’s map project. This project and its all-volunteer staff are dedicated to free, online access for the general public. We rely on contributions and volunteers.

       

      UPCOMING EVENTS

      4 May 2004, Tuesday

      Judd Connor, author of “Muskets, Knives and Bloody Marshes, The Fight for Colonial Georgia,” will be at the Brunswick Library at 7 p.m. Call (912) 267-1212.

      5 May 2004, Wednesday

      Sara Hines Martin will be talking about her book “More Than Petticoats, Remarkable Georgia Women.” at 7 p.m. Brunswick Library. Call (912) 267-1212.

      4 & 6 May 2004, Tues. & Thurs.

      Tours of the Jekyll Island Club Hotel with commentary on the architecture, stories of some of the members, and historical lore. 2 p.m. at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel 371 Riverview Drive, call (912) 635-2600 for reservations.

      6 May 2004, Thursday

      Local author and historian, Patricia Barefoot will be speaking at the Ida Hilton Library in Darien, McIntosh Co. at 7 p.m. She will be discussing coastal history.

      8 May 2004, Saturday

      The movie “Conrack” will be shown coinciding with Old Town Brunswick’s Spring Tour of Homes. The tour will include homes featured in the movie. Showings are at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the Brunswick Library. Call (912) 261-1212.

      9 May 2004, Sunday

      Annual Blessing of the Fleet at Mary Ross Waterfront Park in downtown Brunswick, 3 p.m.

      9 May 2004, Sunday

      Open House on Jekyll Island. Tour 4 of the millionaire cottages and Faith Chapel, for FREE, in the historic district of Jekyll Island. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., call (912) 635-4036

      27-29 May 2004, Thurs.-Sat.

      “Shame the Devil,” at the Ritz Theatre in Downtown Brunswick. An evening with 19th century theatre actress and abolitionist, Fanny Kemble Butler. She will be speaking about her theatre rolls, marriage, and experiences on Butler Island, located in the Altamaha River in McIntosh County. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Show starts at 8 p.m., sponsored by GIAHA, call (912) 262-6934.

      31 May 2004, Monday

      Taps at Twilight in Neptune Park on St. Simons Island hosted by the St. Simons Island Rotary Club.

      Citizens G8 Hospitality Committee

      will be meeting every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in varying locations, from now until the summit. Call (912) 262-1274.

       

      PUBLICATIONS

      “Harriet Tubman, the Road to Freedom”

      By Catherine Clinton, published by Little Brown & Company 2004. An insightful history of the life and times of one of the pioneers of African American and women's rights. Harriet Tubman was born and raised a slave. In her early 20s, she had had enough, better things lay ahead, so in 1849, she became a fugitive for freedom.

      As soon as her freedom was obtained, she realized that many more families were suffering from separation. Harriet’s goal was to lead these estranged families out of the slave holding south, and into freedom where their loved ones awaited.

      Not only was she an “abductor” for the underground railroad, but Harriet also served in the Union Army during the Civil War, an aspect of her life that is ignored by many.

      Two weeks after purchasing this book, I was honored by meeting Ms. Clinton at our local library in April of 2004. She gave a spellbinding lecture of the accomplishments, the failures, the heart aches, and the success of Harriet Tubman’s life. I also had my book autographed. A great and engrossing read on one of the most overlooked pioneers to the shaping of this country.

       

      Annual membership to the CGGS is only $15 for one person or $18 for a family. Membership extends from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2004.

      Remit payment to our treasurer:

      Barbara Baethke
      119 Bayberry Circle
      St. Simons Is. , GA 31522

      MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

       

       

       

       

    • Bobby Muggridge
      Amy, I was looking around at the Glynn Co website this weekend and ran across a listing of many of the local cemeteries and noticed that you had visited some
      Message 2 of 6 , May 16, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Amy, I was looking around at the Glynn Co website this weekend and ran across a listing of many of the local cemeteries and noticed that you had visited  some that I had attempted to survey a couple of years back. 
         I was trying to get a lot of use out of my new digital camera and did a photo survey of several of the African/American cemeteries. I did the one at Bull Island near the Altamaha Park. (I called one of the local Black funeral homes and they called this church "First African Baptist".) I also did Sheffield Methodist, Jerusalem Baptist, which is also on Pennick road was another that I surveyed.
        I also did Salem Baptist on Old Jesup road and will be glad to send you these if you could use them.
        Most of the others I did you already have with the exception of one on Emanuel Church road at the intersection of Gillilee Road. I don't know the name of this cemetery as no church was there and  no name for the cemetery that I could find. I did a survey of the headstones of this cemetery also.
        You are welcome to have my list of any or all of these cemeteries if you wish.
        Sorry I have not been able to attend any of the meetings, but have had conflicts every time, I am also behind with my dues, but am sending a check to catch up right away.
        Best regards,
        Bobby Muggridge
        ----- Original Message -----
        To: CGGS
        Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 2:31 PM
        Subject: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004

         

         

         

         

        Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society

         


        News & Reviews


         
        1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566

        May 2004

         

        29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the College Place United Methodist Church on Altama Avenue.

        At this meeting we would like for you to pick one person or family that you are having trouble with in your research, make a list of records you have checked, and what your obstacles and goals are.

        Or, you can share your never fail research or computer tip that helps you overcome those brick walls. This meeting will be learning while you teach. You are teaching us about your family, and you may learn some interesting tips!

        18 APRIL 2004 Guest speaker Patricia Barefoot lectured on her family research of the Burney family and other families along the Old Post Road that runs between Glynn & Wayne Counties. One of her goals is to find the final resting place of James Stafford. According to an early 1800s map, Margaret Davis Cate marked the gravesite, which today would be located at what is known as the Burney/Popwell Cemetery. His grave has yet to be found.

         

        The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive

        Did you, your father, grandfather, uncles, cousins, etc. serve during World War II? Ever wonder exactly what they lived through?

        The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive, or TARA, was besieged by viewers the day before its grand release on the internet. Over 500, 000 hits were recorded in a two hour period, and due to such a massive amount of viewers, the site has been taken down to be redesigned. But some photos are still viewable at other sites until the new TARA site is operational.

        So what is TARA? This archive is dedicated to over 5 million reconnaissance photos taken by allied pilots during World War II. These photos are of bombed cities, concentration camps, battles in progress, and other aspects of war. One feature photo is of D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on Omaha Beach.

        During World War II photographic reconnaissance played a major part in the intelligence war. The advanced photographic techniques developed gave intelligence officers the ability to view the enemy's activities in 3D, and make highly accurate assessments.

        Other photos show the aftermath of battle, the ruined towns and cities. Recently TARA has been used to find “duds” dropped during the war so that they can be safely detonated by bomb disposal agencies. These aerial photos have also been used in the making of motion pictures. You can purchase some photos at 50% off the normal listed price right now.

        The site is located at

        www.evidenceincamera.co.uk As of right now, the site is still down until they can better handle the massive hits to the site.

         

        Revolutionary War Patriots of Glynn County

        At our last meeting, Bill Ramsaur of the Marshes of Glynn Chapter S.A.R. brought to light 17 patriots of the Revolutionary War, who either settled in Glynn County, were from this area, or were buried here.

        The goal of our local S.A.R. is to find these patriot gravesites, and honor those that have not been identified as a patriot with a military memorial marker.

        Several have been located already, those include:

        William Page [1764-1827]; Cyrus Dart [1764-1817]; Samuel Wright [1738-1804]; Robert Grant [1762-1843]; William Harris [1740-1792]; John Blackstock [1758-1797] all presumable buried in Christ Church.

        Others are William MacIntosh [1725-1801] buried on his home land of St. Clair on St. Simons Island. Benjamin Hart & Nancy Hart. Benjamin is rumored to be buried in Brunswick, most likely under the Glynn Middle School. His wife, Nancy, was buried in Kentucky. Christopher Hillary [1755-1796], one of the few that may have actually been from Glynn County before enlisting.

        Patriot graves that have not been located include:

        John Cutler Braddock [1743-1794]

        Thomas Cater [1751-1800]

        Frederick Lamb [1765-1808]

        Robert Lithgow [1758-1802]

        William Manning [1763-1810]

        George Purvis [1755-1805]

        Thomas E. Stone [1734-1806]

        John Tompkins [1745-1791]

        Your editor’s theory on three of these men are, one, John Tompkins may either be buried on his home site, which is now located off of Hwy. 99 in Glynn County, or in another county or state. Early records indicate that there was a fort out on the Turtle River, known as Tompkins Fort. A horrible battle between the family and Indians, resulted in a few casualties. The skirmish was so loud, that folks on St. Simons Island heard it and came to the rescue. He may be buried at this old home site, or somewhere else. Margaret Davis Cate’s notes on Tompkins Fort suggests that either he died around 1791 or removed from the county.

        Frederick Lamb could also be buried on his homeland, which would now be the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. Not only was the Lamb family cemetery here, it was rumored that over 600 slave burials were located. Many were moved to Freedman’s Cemetery or to the Greenwood Cemetery. As for the Lamb family, they were moved to Palmetto Cemetery. Frederick Lamb could still be out there.

        Lastly, according to records of Tara Fields, who maintains “The Crypt” a site dedicated to Camden & Charlton County History, Thomas Cater may be buried in Camden County, grave location unknown.

        Also during our meeting, Ms. Barefoot touched on the subject of the Manning family, and produced a deed showing the location of the Burney/Popwell Cemetery, and one of the neighbors being Manning, and some Mannings are buried within this cemetery.

        Or could they be one amongst the 800 gravesites, marked and unmarked at Midway Cemetery in Liberty County? Or perhaps at Sunbury? We may never know.

        If one of these men is you ancestor, the S.A.R. asks your help in providing more family information, and possible sites for their burials. Maybe you know of an old home place, or an out of the way cemetery. Maybe you know that they were buried in another, town, county, or state altogether. Whatever the information, it will help with honoring your patriot ancestor of Glynn County, Georgia.

         

        THE BRICK WALL

        Since only a few of us have contributed to the brick wall section, I though that this time I might add some tips in hurtling your brick wall, or at least chipping away some stones.

        When starting out in our genealogical research, many of us stick to what is known, that being family information [i.e. bibles, photos, documents], census, military records, newspapers, court documents, or any other public record available.

        But are you getting the most out of these searches? Member Jerry Martin stresses to us not to limit your search for your ancestor by just looking for him/her or his/her parents, but look into those siblings and neighbors.

        On my Hedrick family, I have found many more siblings to my great-great-grandfather by locating estate records of his siblings that were known. These siblings may also have title to the old home place, where family cemetery was located. One of the biggest aids to my Hedrick research were not even siblings, but cousins. They provided the most history, since their family was researched more, and they were in more public records than my own.

        Take the path least traveled, you never know where it may lead.

        There are other records that are most often overlooked by researchers. Two of the more morbid and often overlooked are coroner records and funeral home records. Coroner records may not exist, but some early records do. Finding them can be an exasperating job, but the end results could be a goldmine of information. Coroners recorded next of kin, who identified the body, cause of death, health of the person up to their death, and more.

        Also, if you ancestor was murdered, there may not be a court record, especially if it was a self defense murder, or a crime of passion.

        Usually only a coroner’s inquest was held, which will shed light on the manner in which your ancestor was murdered and who was involved. Was a witness possibly the missing link to your family tree? Was the suspect found guilty or innocent? Who was the suspect?

        Funeral home records are another resource that can provide birth dates, next of kin, spouses, and what helps me in my Glynn County research, where are these folks buried? Funeral homes provide the information for obits and death records, they may have more than what was printed. Especially if you ancestor’s death was questionable. And even though it’s not always correct information, the family are the ones who provide the genealogical tidbits for the funeral home records.

        Church records are usually never thought of in researching family history. Just recently I have taken on the endeavor of transcribing some these records. One of the first comments made by a researcher is, “I didn’t know he/she was part of this church!” Well of course not, you weren’t alive in 1867. Sometimes, with many families, they changed their beliefs to suit their needs. Many heads of families went to different congregations because they may be feuding with another family that attends the church, or they don’t get their way in a church matter.

        These records can show births, deaths, marriages, family units, where a person was from, what religion they were previously, and so much more.

        The downside to these records is that many churches won’t let you view these records, or the previous minister, pastor, father, rector, whomever, took the records with them when they resigned. Or they were never kept. Some of the records down south, of course, were destroyed during the War Between the States. Use your geography skills, and see if a church is still standing in your ancestor’s home town, you never know where it may lead.

        These are only a few of the many resources overlooked by most of us. In the newsletters to come, I will share some more hammers to use when breaking down a wall.

         

        INTERNET

        http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_phs.htm The Presbyterian Historical Society. Founded in 1852 to "preserve and service materials relating to the history of the Presbyterian Church," the Society's library contains over 200,000 volumes and 20,000,000 manuscripts. In addition to the library, the building houses the Society's archives, a museum, and numerous portraits of key Presbyterian historic figures. You can make queries, but you have to be very specific, plus you either have to go onsite to view the record, or have a professional do the work for you.

        http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/maps/ The USGenWeb’s map project. This project and its all-volunteer staff are dedicated to free, online access for the general public. We rely on contributions and volunteers.

         

        UPCOMING EVENTS

        4 May 2004, Tuesday

        Judd Connor, author of “Muskets, Knives and Bloody Marshes, The Fight for Colonial Georgia,” will be at the Brunswick Library at 7 p.m. Call (912) 267-1212.

        5 May 2004, Wednesday

        Sara Hines Martin will be talking about her book “More Than Petticoats, Remarkable Georgia Women.” at 7 p.m. Brunswick Library. Call (912) 267-1212.

        4 & 6 May 2004, Tues. & Thurs.

        Tours of the Jekyll Island Club Hotel with commentary on the architecture, stories of some of the members, and historical lore. 2 p.m. at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel 371 Riverview Drive, call (912) 635-2600 for reservations.

        6 May 2004, Thursday

        Local author and historian, Patricia Barefoot will be speaking at the Ida Hilton Library in Darien, McIntosh Co. at 7 p.m. She will be discussing coastal history.

        8 May 2004, Saturday

        The movie “Conrack” will be shown coinciding with Old Town Brunswick’s Spring Tour of Homes. The tour will include homes featured in the movie. Showings are at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the Brunswick Library. Call (912) 261-1212.

        9 May 2004, Sunday

        Annual Blessing of the Fleet at Mary Ross Waterfront Park in downtown Brunswick, 3 p.m.

        9 May 2004, Sunday

        Open House on Jekyll Island. Tour 4 of the millionaire cottages and Faith Chapel, for FREE, in the historic district of Jekyll Island. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., call (912) 635-4036

        27-29 May 2004, Thurs.-Sat.

        “Shame the Devil,” at the Ritz Theatre in Downtown Brunswick. An evening with 19th century theatre actress and abolitionist, Fanny Kemble Butler. She will be speaking about her theatre rolls, marriage, and experiences on Butler Island, located in the Altamaha River in McIntosh County. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Show starts at 8 p.m., sponsored by GIAHA, call (912) 262-6934.

        31 May 2004, Monday

        Taps at Twilight in Neptune Park on St. Simons Island hosted by the St. Simons Island Rotary Club.

        Citizens G8 Hospitality Committee

        will be meeting every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in varying locations, from now until the summit. Call (912) 262-1274.

         

        PUBLICATIONS

        “Harriet Tubman, the Road to Freedom”

        By Catherine Clinton, published by Little Brown & Company 2004. An insightful history of the life and times of one of the pioneers of African American and women's rights. Harriet Tubman was born and raised a slave. In her early 20s, she had had enough, better things lay ahead, so in 1849, she became a fugitive for freedom.

        As soon as her freedom was obtained, she realized that many more families were suffering from separation. Harriet’s goal was to lead these estranged families out of the slave holding south, and into freedom where their loved ones awaited.

        Not only was she an “abductor” for the underground railroad, but Harriet also served in the Union Army during the Civil War, an aspect of her life that is ignored by many.

        Two weeks after purchasing this book, I was honored by meeting Ms. Clinton at our local library in April of 2004. She gave a spellbinding lecture of the accomplishments, the failures, the heart aches, and the success of Harriet Tubman’s life. I also had my book autographed. A great and engrossing read on one of the most overlooked pioneers to the shaping of this country.

         

        Annual membership to the CGGS is only $15 for one person or $18 for a family. Membership extends from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2004.

        Remit payment to our treasurer:

        Barbara Baethke
        119 Bayberry Circle
        St. Simons Is. , GA 31522

        MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

         

         

         

         

      • Amy Hedrick
        We need to get together and go over what you have. Salem Baptist is quite large. I am very thorough with what I do, so I would still have to go out there and
        Message 3 of 6 , May 17, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          We need to get together and go over what you have. Salem Baptist is
          quite large. I am very thorough with what I do, so I would still
          have to go out there and survey the cemetery, because I need to know
          where the graves are located. We can at least get a name index
          going with the photos you have.

          Let's set up a time to meet, email me off list.

          Amy Hedrick


          --- In cggs@yahoogroups.com, "Bobby Muggridge" wrote:
          > Amy, I was looking around at the Glynn Co website this weekend and
          ran across a listing of many of the local cemeteries and noticed
          that you had visited some that I had attempted to survey a couple
          of years back.
          > I was trying to get a lot of use out of my new digital camera and
          did a photo survey of several of the African/American cemeteries. I
          did the one at Bull Island near the Altamaha Park. (I called one of
          the local Black funeral homes and they called this church "First
          African Baptist".) I also did Sheffield Methodist, Jerusalem
          Baptist, which is also on Pennick road was another that I surveyed.
          > I also did Salem Baptist on Old Jesup road and will be glad to
          send you these if you could use them.
          > Most of the others I did you already have with the exception of
          one on Emanuel Church road at the intersection of Gillilee Road. I
          don't know the name of this cemetery as no church was there and no
          name for the cemetery that I could find. I did a survey of the
          headstones of this cemetery also.
          > You are welcome to have my list of any or all of these cemeteries
          if you wish.
          > Sorry I have not been able to attend any of the meetings, but have
          had conflicts every time, I am also behind with my dues, but am
          sending a check to catch up right away.
          > Best regards,
          > Bobby Muggridge
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Amy Hedrick
          > To: CGGS
          > Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 2:31 PM
          > Subject: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > News & Reviews
          >
          >
          >
          > 1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566
          >
          > May 2004
          >
          >
          >
          > 29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the
          College Place United Methodist Church on Altama Avenue.
          > At this meeting we would like for you to pick one person
          or family that you are having trouble with in your research, make a
          list of records you have checked, and what your obstacles and goals
          are.
          >
          > Or, you can share your never fail research or computer tip
          that helps you overcome those brick walls. This meeting will be
          learning while you teach. You are teaching us about your family, and
          you may learn some interesting tips!
          > 18 APRIL 2004 Guest speaker Patricia Barefoot lectured on
          her family research of the Burney family and other families along
          the Old Post Road that runs between Glynn & Wayne Counties. One of
          her goals is to find the final resting place of James Stafford.
          According to an early 1800s map, Margaret Davis Cate marked the
          gravesite, which today would be located at what is known as the
          Burney/Popwell Cemetery. His grave has yet to be found.
          >
          >
          >
          > The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive
          > Did you, your father, grandfather, uncles, cousins, etc.
          serve during World War II? Ever wonder exactly what they lived
          through?
          >
          > The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive, or TARA, was besieged
          by viewers the day before its grand release on the internet. Over
          500, 000 hits were recorded in a two hour period, and due to such a
          massive amount of viewers, the site has been taken down to be
          redesigned. But some photos are still viewable at other sites until
          the new TARA site is operational.
          >
          > So what is TARA? This archive is dedicated to over 5
          million reconnaissance photos taken by allied pilots during World
          War II. These photos are of bombed cities, concentration camps,
          battles in progress, and other aspects of war. One feature photo is
          of D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on Omaha Beach.
          > During World War II photographic reconnaissance played a
          major part in the intelligence war. The advanced photographic
          techniques developed gave intelligence officers the ability to view
          the enemy's activities in 3D, and make highly accurate assessments.
          > Other photos show the aftermath of battle, the ruined
          towns and cities. Recently TARA has been used to find "duds" dropped
          during the war so that they can be safely detonated by bomb disposal
          agencies. These aerial photos have also been used in the making of
          motion pictures. You can purchase some photos at 50% off the normal
          listed price right now.
          >
          > The site is located at www.evidenceincamera.co.uk As of
          right now, the site is still down until they can better handle the
          massive hits to the site.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Revolutionary War Patriots of Glynn County
          > At our last meeting, Bill Ramsaur of the Marshes of Glynn
          Chapter S.A.R. brought to light 17 patriots of the Revolutionary
          War, who either settled in Glynn County, were from this area, or
          were buried here.
          >
          > The goal of our local S.A.R. is to find these patriot
          gravesites, and honor those that have not been identified as a
          patriot with a military memorial marker.
          >
          > Several have been located already, those include:
          >
          > William Page [1764-1827]; Cyrus Dart [1764-1817]; Samuel
          Wright [1738-1804]; Robert Grant [1762-1843]; William Harris [1740-
          1792]; John Blackstock [1758-1797] all presumable buried in Christ
          Church.
          >
          > Others are William MacIntosh [1725-1801] buried on his
          home land of St. Clair on St. Simons Island. Benjamin Hart & Nancy
          Hart. Benjamin is rumored to be buried in Brunswick, most likely
          under the Glynn Middle School. His wife, Nancy, was buried in
          Kentucky. Christopher Hillary [1755-1796], one of the few that may
          have actually been from Glynn County before enlisting.
          >
          > Patriot graves that have not been located include:
          >
          > John Cutler Braddock [1743-1794]
          >
          > Thomas Cater [1751-1800]
          >
          > Frederick Lamb [1765-1808]
          >
          > Robert Lithgow [1758-1802]
          >
          > William Manning [1763-1810]
          >
          > George Purvis [1755-1805]
          >
          > Thomas E. Stone [1734-1806]
          >
          > John Tompkins [1745-1791]
          > Your editor's theory on three of these men are, one, John
          Tompkins may either be buried on his home site, which is now located
          off of Hwy. 99 in Glynn County, or in another county or state. Early
          records indicate that there was a fort out on the Turtle River,
          known as Tompkins Fort. A horrible battle between the family and
          Indians, resulted in a few casualties. The skirmish was so loud,
          that folks on St. Simons Island heard it and came to the rescue. He
          may be buried at this old home site, or somewhere else. Margaret
          Davis Cate's notes on Tompkins Fort suggests that either he died
          around 1791 or removed from the county.
          > Frederick Lamb could also be buried on his homeland, which
          would now be the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. Not only
          was the Lamb family cemetery here, it was rumored that over 600
          slave burials were located. Many were moved to Freedman's Cemetery
          or to the Greenwood Cemetery. As for the Lamb family, they were
          moved to Palmetto Cemetery. Frederick Lamb could still be out there.
          >
          > Lastly, according to records of Tara Fields, who
          maintains "The Crypt" a site dedicated to Camden & Charlton County
          History, Thomas Cater may be buried in Camden County, grave location
          unknown.
          >
          > Also during our meeting, Ms. Barefoot touched on the
          subject of the Manning family, and produced a deed showing the
          location of the Burney/Popwell Cemetery, and one of the neighbors
          being Manning, and some Mannings are buried within this cemetery.
          >
          > Or could they be one amongst the 800 gravesites, marked
          and unmarked at Midway Cemetery in Liberty County? Or perhaps at
          Sunbury? We may never know.
          >
          > If one of these men is you ancestor, the S.A.R. asks your
          help in providing more family information, and possible sites for
          their burials. Maybe you know of an old home place, or an out of the
          way cemetery. Maybe you know that they were buried in another, town,
          county, or state altogether. Whatever the information, it will help
          with honoring your patriot ancestor of Glynn County, Georgia.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > THE BRICK WALL
          > Since only a few of us have contributed to the brick wall
          section, I though that this time I might add some tips in hurtling
          your brick wall, or at least chipping away some stones.
          >
          > When starting out in our genealogical research, many of us
          stick to what is known, that being family information [i.e. bibles,
          photos, documents], census, military records, newspapers, court
          documents, or any other public record available.
          >
          > But are you getting the most out of these searches? Member
          Jerry Martin stresses to us not to limit your search for your
          ancestor by just looking for him/her or his/her parents, but look
          into those siblings and neighbors.
          >
          > On my Hedrick family, I have found many more siblings to
          my great-great-grandfather by locating estate records of his
          siblings that were known. These siblings may also have title to the
          old home place, where family cemetery was located. One of the
          biggest aids to my Hedrick research were not even siblings, but
          cousins. They provided the most history, since their family was
          researched more, and they were in more public records than my own.
          >
          > Take the path least traveled, you never know where it may
          lead.
          >
          > There are other records that are most often overlooked by
          researchers. Two of the more morbid and often overlooked are coroner
          records and funeral home records. Coroner records may not exist, but
          some early records do. Finding them can be an exasperating job, but
          the end results could be a goldmine of information. Coroners
          recorded next of kin, who identified the body, cause of death,
          health of the person up to their death, and more.
          >
          > Also, if you ancestor was murdered, there may not be a
          court record, especially if it was a self defense murder, or a crime
          of passion.
          > Usually only a coroner's inquest was held, which will shed
          light on the manner in which your ancestor was murdered and who was
          involved. Was a witness possibly the missing link to your family
          tree? Was the suspect found guilty or innocent? Who was the suspect?
          > Funeral home records are another resource that can provide
          birth dates, next of kin, spouses, and what helps me in my Glynn
          County research, where are these folks buried? Funeral homes provide
          the information for obits and death records, they may have more than
          what was printed. Especially if you ancestor's death was
          questionable. And even though it's not always correct information,
          the family are the ones who provide the genealogical tidbits for the
          funeral home records.
          >
          > Church records are usually never thought of in researching
          family history. Just recently I have taken on the endeavor of
          transcribing some these records. One of the first comments made by a
          researcher is, "I didn't know he/she was part of this church!" Well
          of course not, you weren't alive in 1867. Sometimes, with many
          families, they changed their beliefs to suit their needs. Many heads
          of families went to different congregations because they may be
          feuding with another family that attends the church, or they don't
          get their way in a church matter.
          >
          > These records can show births, deaths, marriages, family
          units, where a person was from, what religion they were previously,
          and so much more.
          >
          > The downside to these records is that many churches won't
          let you view these records, or the previous minister, pastor,
          father, rector, whomever, took the records with them when they
          resigned. Or they were never kept. Some of the records down south,
          of course, were destroyed during the War Between the States. Use
          your geography skills, and see if a church is still standing in your
          ancestor's home town, you never know where it may lead.
          >
          > These are only a few of the many resources overlooked by
          most of us. In the newsletters to come, I will share some more
          hammers to use when breaking down a wall.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > INTERNET
          >
          > http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_phs.htm The
          Presbyterian Historical Society. Founded in 1852 to "preserve and
          service materials relating to the history of the Presbyterian
          Church," the Society's library contains over 200,000 volumes and
          20,000,000 manuscripts. In addition to the library, the building
          houses the Society's archives, a museum, and numerous portraits of
          key Presbyterian historic figures. You can make queries, but you
          have to be very specific, plus you either have to go onsite to view
          the record, or have a professional do the work for you.
          >
          > http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/maps/ The USGenWeb's map
          project. This project and its all-volunteer staff are dedicated to
          free, online access for the general public. We rely on contributions
          and volunteers.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > UPCOMING EVENTS
          > 4 May 2004, Tuesday Judd Connor, author of "Muskets,
          Knives and Bloody Marshes, The Fight for Colonial Georgia," will be
          at the Brunswick Library at 7 p.m. Call (912) 267-1212.
          >
          > 5 May 2004, Wednesday Sara Hines Martin will be talking
          about her book "More Than Petticoats, Remarkable Georgia Women." at
          7 p.m. Brunswick Library. Call (912) 267-1212.
          >
          > 4 & 6 May 2004, Tues. & Thurs. Tours of the Jekyll Island
          Club Hotel with commentary on the architecture, stories of some of
          the members, and historical lore. 2 p.m. at the Jekyll Island Club
          Hotel 371 Riverview Drive, call (912) 635-2600 for reservations.
          >
          > 6 May 2004, Thursday Local author and historian, Patricia
          Barefoot will be speaking at the Ida Hilton Library in Darien,
          McIntosh Co. at 7 p.m. She will be discussing coastal history.
          >
          > 8 May 2004, Saturday The movie "Conrack" will be shown
          coinciding with Old Town Brunswick's Spring Tour of Homes. The tour
          will include homes featured in the movie. Showings are at 10 a.m.
          and 3 p.m. at the Brunswick Library. Call (912) 261-1212.
          >
          > 9 May 2004, Sunday Annual Blessing of the Fleet at Mary
          Ross Waterfront Park in downtown Brunswick, 3 p.m.
          >
          > 9 May 2004, Sunday Open House on Jekyll Island. Tour 4 of
          the millionaire cottages and Faith Chapel, for FREE, in the historic
          district of Jekyll Island. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., call (912) 635-
          4036
          >
          > 27-29 May 2004, Thurs.-Sat. "Shame the Devil," at the Ritz
          Theatre in Downtown Brunswick. An evening with 19th century theatre
          actress and abolitionist, Fanny Kemble Butler. She will be speaking
          about her theatre rolls, marriage, and experiences on Butler Island,
          located in the Altamaha River in McIntosh County. Tickets are $10
          for adults and $5 for students. Show starts at 8 p.m., sponsored by
          GIAHA, call (912) 262-6934.
          >
          > 31 May 2004, Monday Taps at Twilight in Neptune Park on
          St. Simons Island hosted by the St. Simons Island Rotary Club.
          >
          > Citizens G8 Hospitality Committee will be meeting every
          Tuesday at 7 p.m. in varying locations, from now until the summit.
          Call (912) 262-1274.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > PUBLICATIONS
          > "Harriet Tubman, the Road to Freedom" By Catherine
          Clinton, published by Little Brown & Company 2004. An insightful
          history of the life and times of one of the pioneers of African
          American and women's rights. Harriet Tubman was born and raised a
          slave. In her early 20s, she had had enough, better things lay
          ahead, so in 1849, she became a fugitive for freedom.
          >
          > As soon as her freedom was obtained, she realized that
          many more families were suffering from separation. Harriet's goal
          was to lead these estranged families out of the slave holding south,
          and into freedom where their loved ones awaited.
          >
          > Not only was she an "abductor" for the underground
          railroad, but Harriet also served in the Union Army during the Civil
          War, an aspect of her life that is ignored by many.
          >
          > Two weeks after purchasing this book, I was honored by
          meeting Ms. Clinton at our local library in April of 2004. She gave
          a spellbinding lecture of the accomplishments, the failures, the
          heart aches, and the success of Harriet Tubman's life. I also had my
          book autographed. A great and engrossing read on one of the most
          overlooked pioneers to the shaping of this country.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
          > Annual membership to the CGGS is only $15 for one person
          or $18 for a family. Membership extends from 1 January 2004 to 31
          December 2004.
          >
          > Remit payment to our treasurer:
          >
          > Barbara Baethke
          > 119 Bayberry Circle
          > St. Simons Is. , GA 31522
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > -------------------------------------------------------------------
          -----------
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cggs/
          >
          > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > cggs-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
          of Service.
        • Nancy Neylans
          Bobby, I know a lady who has done a manuscript on an Afro-American Cemetery on St. Simons. If you get in touch with me via my email address, I will tell you
          Message 4 of 6 , May 18, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Bobby,
            I know a lady who has done a manuscript on an Afro-American Cemetery on St. Simons.  If you get in touch with me via my email address, I will tell you about her.
            From: Nancy Neylans Potts - St. Simons
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2004 7:29 PM
            Subject: Re: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004

            Amy, I was looking around at the Glynn Co website this weekend and ran across a listing of many of the local cemeteries and noticed that you had visited  some that I had attempted to survey a couple of years back. 
             I was trying to get a lot of use out of my new digital camera and did a photo survey of several of the African/American cemeteries. I did the one at Bull Island near the Altamaha Park. (I called one of the local Black funeral homes and they called this church "First African Baptist".) I also did Sheffield Methodist, Jerusalem Baptist, which is also on Pennick road was another that I surveyed.
            I also did Salem Baptist on Old Jesup road and will be glad to send you these if you could use them.
            Most of the others I did you already have with the exception of one on Emanuel Church road at the intersection of Gillilee Road. I don't know the name of this cemetery as no church was there and  no name for the cemetery that I could find. I did a survey of the headstones of this cemetery also.
            You are welcome to have my list of any or all of these cemeteries if you wish.
            Sorry I have not been able to attend any of the meetings, but have had conflicts every time, I am also behind with my dues, but am sending a check to catch up right away.
            Best regards,
            Bobby Muggridge
            ----- Original Message -----
            To: CGGS
            Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 2:31 PM
            Subject: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004

             

             

             

             

            Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society

             


            News & Reviews


             
            1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566

            May 2004

             

            29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the College Place United Methodist Church on Altama Avenue.

            At this meeting we would like for you to pick one person or family that you are having trouble with in your research, make a list of records you have checked, and what your obstacles and goals are.

            Or, you can share your never fail research or computer tip that helps you overcome those brick walls. This meeting will be learning while you teach. You are teaching us about your family, and you may learn some interesting tips!

            18 APRIL 2004 Guest speaker Patricia Barefoot lectured on her family research of the Burney family and other families along the Old Post Road that runs between Glynn & Wayne Counties. One of her goals is to find the final resting place of James Stafford. According to an early 1800s map, Margaret Davis Cate marked the gravesite, which today would be located at what is known as the Burney/Popwell Cemetery. His grave has yet to be found.

             

            The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive

            Did you, your father, grandfather, uncles, cousins, etc. serve during World War II? Ever wonder exactly what they lived through?

            The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive, or TARA, was besieged by viewers the day before its grand release on the internet. Over 500, 000 hits were recorded in a two hour period, and due to such a massive amount of viewers, the site has been taken down to be redesigned. But some photos are still viewable at other sites until the new TARA site is operational.

            So what is TARA? This archive is dedicated to over 5 million reconnaissance photos taken by allied pilots during World War II. These photos are of bombed cities, concentration camps, battles in progress, and other aspects of war. One feature photo is of D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on Omaha Beach.

            During World War II photographic reconnaissance played a major part in the intelligence war. The advanced photographic techniques developed gave intelligence officers the ability to view the enemy's activities in 3D, and make highly accurate assessments.

            Other photos show the aftermath of battle, the ruined towns and cities. Recently TARA has been used to find “duds” dropped during the war so that they can be safely detonated by bomb disposal agencies. These aerial photos have also been used in the making of motion pictures. You can purchase some photos at 50% off the normal listed price right now.

            The site is located at

            www.evidenceincamera.co.uk As of right now, the site is still down until they can better handle the massive hits to the site.

             

            Revolutionary War Patriots of Glynn County

            At our last meeting, Bill Ramsaur of the Marshes of Glynn Chapter S.A.R. brought to light 17 patriots of the Revolutionary War, who either settled in Glynn County, were from this area, or were buried here.

            The goal of our local S.A.R. is to find these patriot gravesites, and honor those that have not been identified as a patriot with a military memorial marker.

            Several have been located already, those include:

            William Page [1764-1827]; Cyrus Dart [1764-1817]; Samuel Wright [1738-1804]; Robert Grant [1762-1843]; William Harris [1740-1792]; John Blackstock [1758-1797] all presumable buried in Christ Church.

            Others are William MacIntosh [1725-1801] buried on his home land of St. Clair on St. Simons Island. Benjamin Hart & Nancy Hart. Benjamin is rumored to be buried in Brunswick, most likely under the Glynn Middle School. His wife, Nancy, was buried in Kentucky. Christopher Hillary [1755-1796], one of the few that may have actually been from Glynn County before enlisting.

            Patriot graves that have not been located include:

            John Cutler Braddock [1743-1794]

            Thomas Cater [1751-1800]

            Frederick Lamb [1765-1808]

            Robert Lithgow [1758-1802]

            William Manning [1763-1810]

            George Purvis [1755-1805]

            Thomas E. Stone [1734-1806]

            John Tompkins [1745-1791]

            Your editor’s theory on three of these men are, one, John Tompkins may either be buried on his home site, which is now located off of Hwy. 99 in Glynn County, or in another county or state. Early records indicate that there was a fort out on the Turtle River, known as Tompkins Fort. A horrible battle between the family and Indians, resulted in a few casualties. The skirmish was so loud, that folks on St. Simons Island heard it and came to the rescue. He may be buried at this old home site, or somewhere else. Margaret Davis Cate’s notes on Tompkins Fort suggests that either he died around 1791 or removed from the county.

            Frederick Lamb could also be buried on his homeland, which would now be the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. Not only was the Lamb family cemetery here, it was rumored that over 600 slave burials were located. Many were moved to Freedman’s Cemetery or to the Greenwood Cemetery. As for the Lamb family, they were moved to Palmetto Cemetery. Frederick Lamb could still be out there.

            Lastly, according to records of Tara Fields, who maintains “The Crypt” a site dedicated to Camden & Charlton County History, Thomas Cater may be buried in Camden County, grave location unknown.

            Also during our meeting, Ms. Barefoot touched on the subject of the Manning family, and produced a deed showing the location of the Burney/Popwell Cemetery, and one of the neighbors being Manning, and some Mannings are buried within this cemetery.

            Or could they be one amongst the 800 gravesites, marked and unmarked at Midway Cemetery in Liberty County? Or perhaps at Sunbury? We may never know.

            If one of these men is you ancestor, the S.A.R. asks your help in providing more family information, and possible sites for their burials. Maybe you know of an old home place, or an out of the way cemetery. Maybe you know that they were buried in another, town, county, or state altogether. Whatever the information, it will help with honoring your patriot ancestor of Glynn County, Georgia.

             

            THE BRICK WALL

            Since only a few of us have contributed to the brick wall section, I though that this time I might add some tips in hurtling your brick wall, or at least chipping away some stones.

            When starting out in our genealogical research, many of us stick to what is known, that being family information [i.e. bibles, photos, documents], census, military records, newspapers, court documents, or any other public record available.

            But are you getting the most out of these searches? Member Jerry Martin stresses to us not to limit your search for your ancestor by just looking for him/her or his/her parents, but look into those siblings and neighbors.

            On my Hedrick family, I have found many more siblings to my great-great-grandfather by locating estate records of his siblings that were known. These siblings may also have title to the old home place, where family cemetery was located. One of the biggest aids to my Hedrick research were not even siblings, but cousins. They provided the most history, since their family was researched more, and they were in more public records than my own.

            Take the path least traveled, you never know where it may lead.

            There are other records that are most often overlooked by researchers. Two of the more morbid and often overlooked are coroner records and funeral home records. Coroner records may not exist, but some early records do. Finding them can be an exasperating job, but the end results could be a goldmine of information. Coroners recorded next of kin, who identified the body, cause of death, health of the person up to their death, and more.

            Also, if you ancestor was murdered, there may not be a court record, especially if it was a self defense murder, or a crime of passion.

            Usually only a coroner’s inquest was held, which will shed light on the manner in which your ancestor was murdered and who was involved. Was a witness possibly the missing link to your family tree? Was the suspect found guilty or innocent? Who was the suspect?

            Funeral home records are another resource that can provide birth dates, next of kin, spouses, and what helps me in my Glynn County research, where are these folks buried? Funeral homes provide the information for obits and death records, they may have more than what was printed. Especially if you ancestor’s death was questionable. And even though it’s not always correct information, the family are the ones who provide the genealogical tidbits for the funeral home records.

            Church records are usually never thought of in researching family history. Just recently I have taken on the endeavor of transcribing some these records. One of the first comments made by a researcher is, “I didn’t know he/she was part of this church!” Well of course not, you weren’t alive in 1867. Sometimes, with many families, they changed their beliefs to suit their needs. Many heads of families went to different congregations because they may be feuding with another family that attends the church, or they don’t get their way in a church matter.

            These records can show births, deaths, marriages, family units, where a person was from, what religion they were previously, and so much more.

            The downside to these records is that many churches won’t let you view these records, or the previous minister, pastor, father, rector, whomever, took the records with them when they resigned. Or they were never kept. Some of the records down south, of course, were destroyed during the War Between the States. Use your geography skills, and see if a church is still standing in your ancestor’s home town, you never know where it may lead.

            These are only a few of the many resources overlooked by most of us. In the newsletters to come, I will share some more hammers to use when breaking down a wall.

             

            INTERNET

            http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_phs.htm The Presbyterian Historical Society. Founded in 1852 to "preserve and service materials relating to the history of the Presbyterian Church," the Society's library contains over 200,000 volumes and 20,000,000 manuscripts. In addition to the library, the building houses the Society's archives, a museum, and numerous portraits of key Presbyterian historic figures. You can make queries, but you have to be very specific, plus you either have to go onsite to view the record, or have a professional do the work for you.

            http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/maps/ The USGenWeb’s map project. This project and its all-volunteer staff are dedicated to free, online access for the general public. We rely on contributions and volunteers.

             

            UPCOMING EVENTS

            4 May 2004, Tuesday

            Judd Connor, author of “Muskets, Knives and Bloody Marshes, The Fight for Colonial Georgia,” will be at the Brunswick Library at 7 p.m. Call (912) 267-1212.

            5 May 2004, Wednesday

            Sara Hines Martin will be talking about her book “More Than Petticoats, Remarkable Georgia Women.” at 7 p.m. Brunswick Library. Call (912) 267-1212.

            4 & 6 May 2004, Tues. & Thurs.

            Tours of the Jekyll Island Club Hotel with commentary on the architecture, stories of some of the members, and historical lore. 2 p.m. at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel 371 Riverview Drive, call (912) 635-2600 for reservations.

            6 May 2004, Thursday

            Local author and historian, Patricia Barefoot will be speaking at the Ida Hilton Library in Darien, McIntosh Co. at 7 p.m. She will be discussing coastal history.

            8 May 2004, Saturday

            The movie “Conrack” will be shown coinciding with Old Town Brunswick’s Spring Tour of Homes. The tour will include homes featured in the movie. Showings are at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the Brunswick Library. Call (912) 261-1212.

            9 May 2004, Sunday

            Annual Blessing of the Fleet at Mary Ross Waterfront Park in downtown Brunswick, 3 p.m.

            9 May 2004, Sunday

            Open House on Jekyll Island. Tour 4 of the millionaire cottages and Faith Chapel, for FREE, in the historic district of Jekyll Island. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., call (912) 635-4036

            27-29 May 2004, Thurs.-Sat.

            “Shame the Devil,” at the Ritz Theatre in Downtown Brunswick. An evening with 19th century theatre actress and abolitionist, Fanny Kemble Butler. She will be speaking about her theatre rolls, marriage, and experiences on Butler Island, located in the Altamaha River in McIntosh County. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Show starts at 8 p.m., sponsored by GIAHA, call (912) 262-6934.

            31 May 2004, Monday

            Taps at Twilight in Neptune Park on St. Simons Island hosted by the St. Simons Island Rotary Club.

            Citizens G8 Hospitality Committee

            will be meeting every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in varying locations, from now until the summit. Call (912) 262-1274.

             

            PUBLICATIONS

            “Harriet Tubman, the Road to Freedom”

            By Catherine Clinton, published by Little Brown & Company 2004. An insightful history of the life and times of one of the pioneers of African American and women's rights. Harriet Tubman was born and raised a slave. In her early 20s, she had had enough, better things lay ahead, so in 1849, she became a fugitive for freedom.

            As soon as her freedom was obtained, she realized that many more families were suffering from separation. Harriet’s goal was to lead these estranged families out of the slave holding south, and into freedom where their loved ones awaited.

            Not only was she an “abductor” for the underground railroad, but Harriet also served in the Union Army during the Civil War, an aspect of her life that is ignored by many.

            Two weeks after purchasing this book, I was honored by meeting Ms. Clinton at our local library in April of 2004. She gave a spellbinding lecture of the accomplishments, the failures, the heart aches, and the success of Harriet Tubman’s life. I also had my book autographed. A great and engrossing read on one of the most overlooked pioneers to the shaping of this country.

             

            Annual membership to the CGGS is only $15 for one person or $18 for a family. Membership extends from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2004.

            Remit payment to our treasurer:

            Barbara Baethke
            119 Bayberry Circle
            St. Simons Is. , GA 31522

            MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

             

             

             

             


          • Patricia Barefoot
            I wonder if Mr. Muggridge found William Amos at the Honeygall Cemetery. If so, I d be interested to know. Patricia Barefoot ...
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 14, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              I wonder if Mr. Muggridge found William Amos at the Honeygall Cemetery. If
              so, I'd be interested to know. Patricia Barefoot


              >From: "Bobby Muggridge" <bmugg@...>
              >Reply-To: cggs@yahoogroups.com
              >To: <cggs@yahoogroups.com>
              >Subject: Re: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004
              >Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 19:29:25 -0400
              >
              >Amy, I was looking around at the Glynn Co website this weekend and ran
              >across a listing of many of the local cemeteries and noticed that you had
              >visited some that I had attempted to survey a couple of years back.
              > I was trying to get a lot of use out of my new digital camera and did a
              >photo survey of several of the African/American cemeteries. I did the one
              >at Bull Island near the Altamaha Park. (I called one of the local Black
              >funeral homes and they called this church "First African Baptist".) I also
              >did Sheffield Methodist, Jerusalem Baptist, which is also on Pennick road
              >was another that I surveyed.
              >I also did Salem Baptist on Old Jesup road and will be glad to send you
              >these if you could use them.
              >Most of the others I did you already have with the exception of one on
              >Emanuel Church road at the intersection of Gillilee Road. I don't know the
              >name of this cemetery as no church was there and no name for the cemetery
              >that I could find. I did a survey of the headstones of this cemetery also.
              >You are welcome to have my list of any or all of these cemeteries if you
              >wish.
              >Sorry I have not been able to attend any of the meetings, but have had
              >conflicts every time, I am also behind with my dues, but am sending a check
              >to catch up right away.
              >Best regards,
              >Bobby Muggridge
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Amy Hedrick
              > To: CGGS
              > Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 2:31 PM
              > Subject: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > News & Reviews
              >
              >
              >
              > 1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566
              >
              > May 2004
              >
              >
              >
              > 29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the College
              >Place United Methodist Church on Altama Avenue.
              > At this meeting we would like for you to pick one person or family
              >that you are having trouble with in your research, make a list of records
              >you have checked, and what your obstacles and goals are.
              >
              > Or, you can share your never fail research or computer tip that
              >helps you overcome those brick walls. This meeting will be learning while
              >you teach. You are teaching us about your family, and you may learn some
              >interesting tips!
              > 18 APRIL 2004 Guest speaker Patricia Barefoot lectured on her
              >family research of the Burney family and other families along the Old Post
              >Road that runs between Glynn & Wayne Counties. One of her goals is to find
              >the final resting place of James Stafford. According to an early 1800s map,
              >Margaret Davis Cate marked the gravesite, which today would be located at
              >what is known as the Burney/Popwell Cemetery. His grave has yet to be
              >found.
              >
              >
              >
              > The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive
              > Did you, your father, grandfather, uncles, cousins, etc. serve
              >during World War II? Ever wonder exactly what they lived through?
              >
              > The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive, or TARA, was besieged by
              >viewers the day before its grand release on the internet. Over 500, 000
              >hits were recorded in a two hour period, and due to such a massive amount
              >of viewers, the site has been taken down to be redesigned. But some photos
              >are still viewable at other sites until the new TARA site is operational.
              >
              > So what is TARA? This archive is dedicated to over 5 million
              >reconnaissance photos taken by allied pilots during World War II. These
              >photos are of bombed cities, concentration camps, battles in progress, and
              >other aspects of war. One feature photo is of D-Day, the invasion of
              >Normandy on Omaha Beach.
              > During World War II photographic reconnaissance played a major part
              >in the intelligence war. The advanced photographic techniques developed
              >gave intelligence officers the ability to view the enemy's activities in
              >3D, and make highly accurate assessments.
              > Other photos show the aftermath of battle, the ruined towns and
              >cities. Recently TARA has been used to find "duds" dropped during the war
              >so that they can be safely detonated by bomb disposal agencies. These
              >aerial photos have also been used in the making of motion pictures. You can
              >purchase some photos at 50% off the normal listed price right now.
              >
              > The site is located at www.evidenceincamera.co.uk As of right now,
              >the site is still down until they can better handle the massive hits to the
              >site.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Revolutionary War Patriots of Glynn County
              > At our last meeting, Bill Ramsaur of the Marshes of Glynn Chapter
              >S.A.R. brought to light 17 patriots of the Revolutionary War, who either
              >settled in Glynn County, were from this area, or were buried here.
              >
              > The goal of our local S.A.R. is to find these patriot gravesites,
              >and honor those that have not been identified as a patriot with a military
              >memorial marker.
              >
              > Several have been located already, those include:
              >
              > William Page [1764-1827]; Cyrus Dart [1764-1817]; Samuel Wright
              >[1738-1804]; Robert Grant [1762-1843]; William Harris [1740-1792]; John
              >Blackstock [1758-1797] all presumable buried in Christ Church.
              >
              > Others are William MacIntosh [1725-1801] buried on his home land
              >of St. Clair on St. Simons Island. Benjamin Hart & Nancy Hart. Benjamin is
              >rumored to be buried in Brunswick, most likely under the Glynn Middle
              >School. His wife, Nancy, was buried in Kentucky. Christopher Hillary
              >[1755-1796], one of the few that may have actually been from Glynn County
              >before enlisting.
              >
              > Patriot graves that have not been located include:
              >
              > John Cutler Braddock [1743-1794]
              >
              > Thomas Cater [1751-1800]
              >
              > Frederick Lamb [1765-1808]
              >
              > Robert Lithgow [1758-1802]
              >
              > William Manning [1763-1810]
              >
              > George Purvis [1755-1805]
              >
              > Thomas E. Stone [1734-1806]
              >
              > John Tompkins [1745-1791]
              > Your editor's theory on three of these men are, one, John Tompkins
              >may either be buried on his home site, which is now located off of Hwy. 99
              >in Glynn County, or in another county or state. Early records indicate that
              >there was a fort out on the Turtle River, known as Tompkins Fort. A
              >horrible battle between the family and Indians, resulted in a few
              >casualties. The skirmish was so loud, that folks on St. Simons Island heard
              >it and came to the rescue. He may be buried at this old home site, or
              >somewhere else. Margaret Davis Cate's notes on Tompkins Fort suggests that
              >either he died around 1791 or removed from the county.
              > Frederick Lamb could also be buried on his homeland, which would
              >now be the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. Not only was the Lamb
              >family cemetery here, it was rumored that over 600 slave burials were
              >located. Many were moved to Freedman's Cemetery or to the Greenwood
              >Cemetery. As for the Lamb family, they were moved to Palmetto Cemetery.
              >Frederick Lamb could still be out there.
              >
              > Lastly, according to records of Tara Fields, who maintains "The
              >Crypt" a site dedicated to Camden & Charlton County History, Thomas Cater
              >may be buried in Camden County, grave location unknown.
              >
              > Also during our meeting, Ms. Barefoot touched on the subject of
              >the Manning family, and produced a deed showing the location of the
              >Burney/Popwell Cemetery, and one of the neighbors being Manning, and some
              >Mannings are buried within this cemetery.
              >
              > Or could they be one amongst the 800 gravesites, marked and
              >unmarked at Midway Cemetery in Liberty County? Or perhaps at Sunbury? We
              >may never know.
              >
              > If one of these men is you ancestor, the S.A.R. asks your help in
              >providing more family information, and possible sites for their burials.
              >Maybe you know of an old home place, or an out of the way cemetery. Maybe
              >you know that they were buried in another, town, county, or state
              >altogether. Whatever the information, it will help with honoring your
              >patriot ancestor of Glynn County, Georgia.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > THE BRICK WALL
              > Since only a few of us have contributed to the brick wall section,
              >I though that this time I might add some tips in hurtling your brick wall,
              >or at least chipping away some stones.
              >
              > When starting out in our genealogical research, many of us stick
              >to what is known, that being family information [i.e. bibles, photos,
              >documents], census, military records, newspapers, court documents, or any
              >other public record available.
              >
              > But are you getting the most out of these searches? Member Jerry
              >Martin stresses to us not to limit your search for your ancestor by just
              >looking for him/her or his/her parents, but look into those siblings and
              >neighbors.
              >
              > On my Hedrick family, I have found many more siblings to my
              >great-great-grandfather by locating estate records of his siblings that
              >were known. These siblings may also have title to the old home place, where
              >family cemetery was located. One of the biggest aids to my Hedrick research
              >were not even siblings, but cousins. They provided the most history, since
              >their family was researched more, and they were in more public records than
              >my own.
              >
              > Take the path least traveled, you never know where it may lead.
              >
              > There are other records that are most often overlooked by
              >researchers. Two of the more morbid and often overlooked are coroner
              >records and funeral home records. Coroner records may not exist, but some
              >early records do. Finding them can be an exasperating job, but the end
              >results could be a goldmine of information. Coroners recorded next of kin,
              >who identified the body, cause of death, health of the person up to their
              >death, and more.
              >
              > Also, if you ancestor was murdered, there may not be a court
              >record, especially if it was a self defense murder, or a crime of passion.
              > Usually only a coroner's inquest was held, which will shed light on
              >the manner in which your ancestor was murdered and who was involved. Was a
              >witness possibly the missing link to your family tree? Was the suspect
              >found guilty or innocent? Who was the suspect?
              > Funeral home records are another resource that can provide birth
              >dates, next of kin, spouses, and what helps me in my Glynn County research,
              >where are these folks buried? Funeral homes provide the information for
              >obits and death records, they may have more than what was printed.
              >Especially if you ancestor's death was questionable. And even though it's
              >not always correct information, the family are the ones who provide the
              >genealogical tidbits for the funeral home records.
              >
              > Church records are usually never thought of in researching family
              >history. Just recently I have taken on the endeavor of transcribing some
              >these records. One of the first comments made by a researcher is, "I didn't
              >know he/she was part of this church!" Well of course not, you weren't alive
              >in 1867. Sometimes, with many families, they changed their beliefs to suit
              >their needs. Many heads of families went to different congregations because
              >they may be feuding with another family that attends the church, or they
              >don't get their way in a church matter.
              >
              > These records can show births, deaths, marriages, family units,
              >where a person was from, what religion they were previously, and so much
              >more.
              >
              > The downside to these records is that many churches won't let you
              >view these records, or the previous minister, pastor, father, rector,
              >whomever, took the records with them when they resigned. Or they were never
              >kept. Some of the records down south, of course, were destroyed during the
              >War Between the States. Use your geography skills, and see if a church is
              >still standing in your ancestor's home town, you never know where it may
              >lead.
              >
              > These are only a few of the many resources overlooked by most of
              >us. In the newsletters to come, I will share some more hammers to use when
              >breaking down a wall.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > INTERNET
              >
              > http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_phs.htm The Presbyterian
              >Historical Society. Founded in 1852 to "preserve and service materials
              >relating to the history of the Presbyterian Church," the Society's library
              >contains over 200,000 volumes and 20,000,000 manuscripts. In addition to
              >the library, the building houses the Society's archives, a museum, and
              >numerous portraits of key Presbyterian historic figures. You can make
              >queries, but you have to be very specific, plus you either have to go
              >onsite to view the record, or have a professional do the work for you.
              >
              > http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/maps/ The USGenWeb's map
              >project. This project and its all-volunteer staff are dedicated to free,
              >online access for the general public. We rely on contributions and
              >volunteers.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > UPCOMING EVENTS
              > 4 May 2004, Tuesday Judd Connor, author of "Muskets, Knives and
              >Bloody Marshes, The Fight for Colonial Georgia," will be at the Brunswick
              >Library at 7 p.m. Call (912) 267-1212.
              >
              > 5 May 2004, Wednesday Sara Hines Martin will be talking about her
              >book "More Than Petticoats, Remarkable Georgia Women." at 7 p.m. Brunswick
              >Library. Call (912) 267-1212.
              >
              > 4 & 6 May 2004, Tues. & Thurs. Tours of the Jekyll Island Club
              >Hotel with commentary on the architecture, stories of some of the members,
              >and historical lore. 2 p.m. at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel 371 Riverview
              >Drive, call (912) 635-2600 for reservations.
              >
              > 6 May 2004, Thursday Local author and historian, Patricia Barefoot
              >will be speaking at the Ida Hilton Library in Darien, McIntosh Co. at 7
              >p.m. She will be discussing coastal history.
              >
              > 8 May 2004, Saturday The movie "Conrack" will be shown coinciding
              >with Old Town Brunswick's Spring Tour of Homes. The tour will include homes
              >featured in the movie. Showings are at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the Brunswick
              >Library. Call (912) 261-1212.
              >
              > 9 May 2004, Sunday Annual Blessing of the Fleet at Mary Ross
              >Waterfront Park in downtown Brunswick, 3 p.m.
              >
              > 9 May 2004, Sunday Open House on Jekyll Island. Tour 4 of the
              >millionaire cottages and Faith Chapel, for FREE, in the historic district
              >of Jekyll Island. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., call (912) 635-4036
              >
              > 27-29 May 2004, Thurs.-Sat. "Shame the Devil," at the Ritz Theatre
              >in Downtown Brunswick. An evening with 19th century theatre actress and
              >abolitionist, Fanny Kemble Butler. She will be speaking about her theatre
              >rolls, marriage, and experiences on Butler Island, located in the Altamaha
              >River in McIntosh County. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students.
              >Show starts at 8 p.m., sponsored by GIAHA, call (912) 262-6934.
              >
              > 31 May 2004, Monday Taps at Twilight in Neptune Park on St. Simons
              >Island hosted by the St. Simons Island Rotary Club.
              >
              > Citizens G8 Hospitality Committee will be meeting every Tuesday at
              >7 p.m. in varying locations, from now until the summit. Call (912)
              >262-1274.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > PUBLICATIONS
              > "Harriet Tubman, the Road to Freedom" By Catherine Clinton,
              >published by Little Brown & Company 2004. An insightful history of the life
              >and times of one of the pioneers of African American and women's rights.
              >Harriet Tubman was born and raised a slave. In her early 20s, she had had
              >enough, better things lay ahead, so in 1849, she became a fugitive for
              >freedom.
              >
              > As soon as her freedom was obtained, she realized that many more
              >families were suffering from separation. Harriet's goal was to lead these
              >estranged families out of the slave holding south, and into freedom where
              >their loved ones awaited.
              >
              > Not only was she an "abductor" for the underground railroad, but
              >Harriet also served in the Union Army during the Civil War, an aspect of
              >her life that is ignored by many.
              >
              > Two weeks after purchasing this book, I was honored by meeting Ms.
              >Clinton at our local library in April of 2004. She gave a spellbinding
              >lecture of the accomplishments, the failures, the heart aches, and the
              >success of Harriet Tubman's life. I also had my book autographed. A great
              >and engrossing read on one of the most overlooked pioneers to the shaping
              >of this country.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
              > Annual membership to the CGGS is only $15 for one person or $18
              >for a family. Membership extends from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2004.
              >
              > Remit payment to our treasurer:
              >
              > Barbara Baethke
              > 119 Bayberry Circle
              > St. Simons Is. , GA 31522
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cggs/
              >
              > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > cggs-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              >Service.
              >
              >

              _________________________________________________________________
              Watch the online reality show Mixed Messages with a friend and enter to win
              a trip to NY
              http://www.msnmessenger-download.click-url.com/go/onm00200497ave/direct/01/
            • Amy Hedrick
              I don t think this cemetery exists anymore. Bobby did all the African-American cemeteries in the area. He just sent me all his transcriptions for the web site
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 14, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                I don't think this cemetery exists anymore. Bobby did all the
                African-American cemeteries in the area.

                He just sent me all his transcriptions for the web site and Mr. Amos isn't
                listed. I think he is in someone's back yard, and they don't know it.

                Amy

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Patricia Barefoot" <barefootpatricia7@...>
                To: <cggs@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, June 14, 2004 12:38 PM
                Subject: Re: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004


                > I wonder if Mr. Muggridge found William Amos at the Honeygall Cemetery.
                If
                > so, I'd be interested to know. Patricia Barefoot
                >
                >
                > >From: "Bobby Muggridge" <bmugg@...>
                > >Reply-To: cggs@yahoogroups.com
                > >To: <cggs@yahoogroups.com>
                > >Subject: Re: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004
                > >Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 19:29:25 -0400
                > >
                > >Amy, I was looking around at the Glynn Co website this weekend and ran
                > >across a listing of many of the local cemeteries and noticed that you had
                > >visited some that I had attempted to survey a couple of years back.
                > > I was trying to get a lot of use out of my new digital camera and did a
                > >photo survey of several of the African/American cemeteries. I did the one
                > >at Bull Island near the Altamaha Park. (I called one of the local Black
                > >funeral homes and they called this church "First African Baptist".) I
                also
                > >did Sheffield Methodist, Jerusalem Baptist, which is also on Pennick road
                > >was another that I surveyed.
                > >I also did Salem Baptist on Old Jesup road and will be glad to send you
                > >these if you could use them.
                > >Most of the others I did you already have with the exception of one on
                > >Emanuel Church road at the intersection of Gillilee Road. I don't know
                the
                > >name of this cemetery as no church was there and no name for the
                cemetery
                > >that I could find. I did a survey of the headstones of this cemetery
                also.
                > >You are welcome to have my list of any or all of these cemeteries if you
                > >wish.
                > >Sorry I have not been able to attend any of the meetings, but have had
                > >conflicts every time, I am also behind with my dues, but am sending a
                check
                > >to catch up right away.
                > >Best regards,
                > >Bobby Muggridge
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: Amy Hedrick
                > > To: CGGS
                > > Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 2:31 PM
                > > Subject: [cggs] Newsletter May 2004
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Coastal Georgia Genealogical Society
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > News & Reviews
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > 1058 Whisper Ridge Loop, Waynesville, GA 31566
                > >
                > > May 2004
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > 29 August 2004 Meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m. at the College
                > >Place United Methodist Church on Altama Avenue.
                > > At this meeting we would like for you to pick one person or
                family
                > >that you are having trouble with in your research, make a list of records
                > >you have checked, and what your obstacles and goals are.
                > >
                > > Or, you can share your never fail research or computer tip that
                > >helps you overcome those brick walls. This meeting will be learning while
                > >you teach. You are teaching us about your family, and you may learn some
                > >interesting tips!
                > > 18 APRIL 2004 Guest speaker Patricia Barefoot lectured on her
                > >family research of the Burney family and other families along the Old
                Post
                > >Road that runs between Glynn & Wayne Counties. One of her goals is to
                find
                > >the final resting place of James Stafford. According to an early 1800s
                map,
                > >Margaret Davis Cate marked the gravesite, which today would be located at
                > >what is known as the Burney/Popwell Cemetery. His grave has yet to be
                > >found.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive
                > > Did you, your father, grandfather, uncles, cousins, etc. serve
                > >during World War II? Ever wonder exactly what they lived through?
                > >
                > > The Aerial Reconnaissance Archive, or TARA, was besieged by
                > >viewers the day before its grand release on the internet. Over 500, 000
                > >hits were recorded in a two hour period, and due to such a massive amount
                > >of viewers, the site has been taken down to be redesigned. But some
                photos
                > >are still viewable at other sites until the new TARA site is operational.
                > >
                > > So what is TARA? This archive is dedicated to over 5 million
                > >reconnaissance photos taken by allied pilots during World War II. These
                > >photos are of bombed cities, concentration camps, battles in progress,
                and
                > >other aspects of war. One feature photo is of D-Day, the invasion of
                > >Normandy on Omaha Beach.
                > > During World War II photographic reconnaissance played a major
                part
                > >in the intelligence war. The advanced photographic techniques developed
                > >gave intelligence officers the ability to view the enemy's activities in
                > >3D, and make highly accurate assessments.
                > > Other photos show the aftermath of battle, the ruined towns and
                > >cities. Recently TARA has been used to find "duds" dropped during the war
                > >so that they can be safely detonated by bomb disposal agencies. These
                > >aerial photos have also been used in the making of motion pictures. You
                can
                > >purchase some photos at 50% off the normal listed price right now.
                > >
                > > The site is located at www.evidenceincamera.co.uk As of right
                now,
                > >the site is still down until they can better handle the massive hits to
                the
                > >site.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Revolutionary War Patriots of Glynn County
                > > At our last meeting, Bill Ramsaur of the Marshes of Glynn
                Chapter
                > >S.A.R. brought to light 17 patriots of the Revolutionary War, who either
                > >settled in Glynn County, were from this area, or were buried here.
                > >
                > > The goal of our local S.A.R. is to find these patriot
                gravesites,
                > >and honor those that have not been identified as a patriot with a
                military
                > >memorial marker.
                > >
                > > Several have been located already, those include:
                > >
                > > William Page [1764-1827]; Cyrus Dart [1764-1817]; Samuel Wright
                > >[1738-1804]; Robert Grant [1762-1843]; William Harris [1740-1792]; John
                > >Blackstock [1758-1797] all presumable buried in Christ Church.
                > >
                > > Others are William MacIntosh [1725-1801] buried on his home land
                > >of St. Clair on St. Simons Island. Benjamin Hart & Nancy Hart. Benjamin
                is
                > >rumored to be buried in Brunswick, most likely under the Glynn Middle
                > >School. His wife, Nancy, was buried in Kentucky. Christopher Hillary
                > >[1755-1796], one of the few that may have actually been from Glynn County
                > >before enlisting.
                > >
                > > Patriot graves that have not been located include:
                > >
                > > John Cutler Braddock [1743-1794]
                > >
                > > Thomas Cater [1751-1800]
                > >
                > > Frederick Lamb [1765-1808]
                > >
                > > Robert Lithgow [1758-1802]
                > >
                > > William Manning [1763-1810]
                > >
                > > George Purvis [1755-1805]
                > >
                > > Thomas E. Stone [1734-1806]
                > >
                > > John Tompkins [1745-1791]
                > > Your editor's theory on three of these men are, one, John
                Tompkins
                > >may either be buried on his home site, which is now located off of Hwy.
                99
                > >in Glynn County, or in another county or state. Early records indicate
                that
                > >there was a fort out on the Turtle River, known as Tompkins Fort. A
                > >horrible battle between the family and Indians, resulted in a few
                > >casualties. The skirmish was so loud, that folks on St. Simons Island
                heard
                > >it and came to the rescue. He may be buried at this old home site, or
                > >somewhere else. Margaret Davis Cate's notes on Tompkins Fort suggests
                that
                > >either he died around 1791 or removed from the county.
                > > Frederick Lamb could also be buried on his homeland, which would
                > >now be the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. Not only was the Lamb
                > >family cemetery here, it was rumored that over 600 slave burials were
                > >located. Many were moved to Freedman's Cemetery or to the Greenwood
                > >Cemetery. As for the Lamb family, they were moved to Palmetto Cemetery.
                > >Frederick Lamb could still be out there.
                > >
                > > Lastly, according to records of Tara Fields, who maintains "The
                > >Crypt" a site dedicated to Camden & Charlton County History, Thomas Cater
                > >may be buried in Camden County, grave location unknown.
                > >
                > > Also during our meeting, Ms. Barefoot touched on the subject of
                > >the Manning family, and produced a deed showing the location of the
                > >Burney/Popwell Cemetery, and one of the neighbors being Manning, and some
                > >Mannings are buried within this cemetery.
                > >
                > > Or could they be one amongst the 800 gravesites, marked and
                > >unmarked at Midway Cemetery in Liberty County? Or perhaps at Sunbury? We
                > >may never know.
                > >
                > > If one of these men is you ancestor, the S.A.R. asks your help
                in
                > >providing more family information, and possible sites for their burials.
                > >Maybe you know of an old home place, or an out of the way cemetery. Maybe
                > >you know that they were buried in another, town, county, or state
                > >altogether. Whatever the information, it will help with honoring your
                > >patriot ancestor of Glynn County, Georgia.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > THE BRICK WALL
                > > Since only a few of us have contributed to the brick wall
                section,
                > >I though that this time I might add some tips in hurtling your brick
                wall,
                > >or at least chipping away some stones.
                > >
                > > When starting out in our genealogical research, many of us stick
                > >to what is known, that being family information [i.e. bibles, photos,
                > >documents], census, military records, newspapers, court documents, or any
                > >other public record available.
                > >
                > > But are you getting the most out of these searches? Member Jerry
                > >Martin stresses to us not to limit your search for your ancestor by just
                > >looking for him/her or his/her parents, but look into those siblings and
                > >neighbors.
                > >
                > > On my Hedrick family, I have found many more siblings to my
                > >great-great-grandfather by locating estate records of his siblings that
                > >were known. These siblings may also have title to the old home place,
                where
                > >family cemetery was located. One of the biggest aids to my Hedrick
                research
                > >were not even siblings, but cousins. They provided the most history,
                since
                > >their family was researched more, and they were in more public records
                than
                > >my own.
                > >
                > > Take the path least traveled, you never know where it may lead.
                > >
                > > There are other records that are most often overlooked by
                > >researchers. Two of the more morbid and often overlooked are coroner
                > >records and funeral home records. Coroner records may not exist, but some
                > >early records do. Finding them can be an exasperating job, but the end
                > >results could be a goldmine of information. Coroners recorded next of
                kin,
                > >who identified the body, cause of death, health of the person up to their
                > >death, and more.
                > >
                > > Also, if you ancestor was murdered, there may not be a court
                > >record, especially if it was a self defense murder, or a crime of
                passion.
                > > Usually only a coroner's inquest was held, which will shed light
                on
                > >the manner in which your ancestor was murdered and who was involved. Was
                a
                > >witness possibly the missing link to your family tree? Was the suspect
                > >found guilty or innocent? Who was the suspect?
                > > Funeral home records are another resource that can provide birth
                > >dates, next of kin, spouses, and what helps me in my Glynn County
                research,
                > >where are these folks buried? Funeral homes provide the information for
                > >obits and death records, they may have more than what was printed.
                > >Especially if you ancestor's death was questionable. And even though it's
                > >not always correct information, the family are the ones who provide the
                > >genealogical tidbits for the funeral home records.
                > >
                > > Church records are usually never thought of in researching
                family
                > >history. Just recently I have taken on the endeavor of transcribing some
                > >these records. One of the first comments made by a researcher is, "I
                didn't
                > >know he/she was part of this church!" Well of course not, you weren't
                alive
                > >in 1867. Sometimes, with many families, they changed their beliefs to
                suit
                > >their needs. Many heads of families went to different congregations
                because
                > >they may be feuding with another family that attends the church, or they
                > >don't get their way in a church matter.
                > >
                > > These records can show births, deaths, marriages, family units,
                > >where a person was from, what religion they were previously, and so much
                > >more.
                > >
                > > The downside to these records is that many churches won't let
                you
                > >view these records, or the previous minister, pastor, father, rector,
                > >whomever, took the records with them when they resigned. Or they were
                never
                > >kept. Some of the records down south, of course, were destroyed during
                the
                > >War Between the States. Use your geography skills, and see if a church is
                > >still standing in your ancestor's home town, you never know where it may
                > >lead.
                > >
                > > These are only a few of the many resources overlooked by most of
                > >us. In the newsletters to come, I will share some more hammers to use
                when
                > >breaking down a wall.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > INTERNET
                > >
                > > http://www.ushistory.org/tour/tour_phs.htm The Presbyterian
                > >Historical Society. Founded in 1852 to "preserve and service materials
                > >relating to the history of the Presbyterian Church," the Society's
                library
                > >contains over 200,000 volumes and 20,000,000 manuscripts. In addition to
                > >the library, the building houses the Society's archives, a museum, and
                > >numerous portraits of key Presbyterian historic figures. You can make
                > >queries, but you have to be very specific, plus you either have to go
                > >onsite to view the record, or have a professional do the work for you.
                > >
                > > http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/maps/ The USGenWeb's map
                > >project. This project and its all-volunteer staff are dedicated to free,
                > >online access for the general public. We rely on contributions and
                > >volunteers.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > UPCOMING EVENTS
                > > 4 May 2004, Tuesday Judd Connor, author of "Muskets, Knives and
                > >Bloody Marshes, The Fight for Colonial Georgia," will be at the Brunswick
                > >Library at 7 p.m. Call (912) 267-1212.
                > >
                > > 5 May 2004, Wednesday Sara Hines Martin will be talking about
                her
                > >book "More Than Petticoats, Remarkable Georgia Women." at 7 p.m.
                Brunswick
                > >Library. Call (912) 267-1212.
                > >
                > > 4 & 6 May 2004, Tues. & Thurs. Tours of the Jekyll Island Club
                > >Hotel with commentary on the architecture, stories of some of the
                members,
                > >and historical lore. 2 p.m. at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel 371 Riverview
                > >Drive, call (912) 635-2600 for reservations.
                > >
                > > 6 May 2004, Thursday Local author and historian, Patricia
                Barefoot
                > >will be speaking at the Ida Hilton Library in Darien, McIntosh Co. at 7
                > >p.m. She will be discussing coastal history.
                > >
                > > 8 May 2004, Saturday The movie "Conrack" will be shown
                coinciding
                > >with Old Town Brunswick's Spring Tour of Homes. The tour will include
                homes
                > >featured in the movie. Showings are at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the
                Brunswick
                > >Library. Call (912) 261-1212.
                > >
                > > 9 May 2004, Sunday Annual Blessing of the Fleet at Mary Ross
                > >Waterfront Park in downtown Brunswick, 3 p.m.
                > >
                > > 9 May 2004, Sunday Open House on Jekyll Island. Tour 4 of the
                > >millionaire cottages and Faith Chapel, for FREE, in the historic district
                > >of Jekyll Island. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., call (912) 635-4036
                > >
                > > 27-29 May 2004, Thurs.-Sat. "Shame the Devil," at the Ritz
                Theatre
                > >in Downtown Brunswick. An evening with 19th century theatre actress and
                > >abolitionist, Fanny Kemble Butler. She will be speaking about her theatre
                > >rolls, marriage, and experiences on Butler Island, located in the
                Altamaha
                > >River in McIntosh County. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students.
                > >Show starts at 8 p.m., sponsored by GIAHA, call (912) 262-6934.
                > >
                > > 31 May 2004, Monday Taps at Twilight in Neptune Park on St.
                Simons
                > >Island hosted by the St. Simons Island Rotary Club.
                > >
                > > Citizens G8 Hospitality Committee will be meeting every Tuesday
                at
                > >7 p.m. in varying locations, from now until the summit. Call (912)
                > >262-1274.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > PUBLICATIONS
                > > "Harriet Tubman, the Road to Freedom" By Catherine Clinton,
                > >published by Little Brown & Company 2004. An insightful history of the
                life
                > >and times of one of the pioneers of African American and women's rights.
                > >Harriet Tubman was born and raised a slave. In her early 20s, she had had
                > >enough, better things lay ahead, so in 1849, she became a fugitive for
                > >freedom.
                > >
                > > As soon as her freedom was obtained, she realized that many more
                > >families were suffering from separation. Harriet's goal was to lead these
                > >estranged families out of the slave holding south, and into freedom where
                > >their loved ones awaited.
                > >
                > > Not only was she an "abductor" for the underground railroad, but
                > >Harriet also served in the Union Army during the Civil War, an aspect of
                > >her life that is ignored by many.
                > >
                > > Two weeks after purchasing this book, I was honored by meeting
                Ms.
                > >Clinton at our local library in April of 2004. She gave a spellbinding
                > >lecture of the accomplishments, the failures, the heart aches, and the
                > >success of Harriet Tubman's life. I also had my book autographed. A great
                > >and engrossing read on one of the most overlooked pioneers to the shaping
                > >of this country.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
                > > Annual membership to the CGGS is only $15 for one person or $18
                > >for a family. Membership extends from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2004.
                > >
                > > Remit payment to our treasurer:
                > >
                > > Barbara Baethke
                > > 119 Bayberry Circle
                > > St. Simons Is. , GA 31522
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >---------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                > >
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                > >
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                > >
                > > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                > >Service.
                > >
                > >
                >
                > _________________________________________________________________
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