Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Pastor Geoff's Fifth Commandment Study - Introduction

Expand Messages
  • Janice Lee
    Pastor Geoff s Fifth Commandment Study - Introduction My grandfather lived with my family from the time I was nine months old, until his physical and mental
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Pastor Geoff's Fifth Commandment Study - Introduction

      My grandfather lived with my family from the time I was nine months old, until his physical and mental condition required he have professional care. He left us about the time I was in Jr. High school. For me, it was great to have him with us. I had someone to read Walt Whitman to me, to watch wrestling with and to take me fishing. From my perspective, it didn’t seem to be too much of a problem for my father. It wasn’t an ideal arrangement for my brothers though, because it meant sharing a room until they were almost ready to go to Jr. High themselves. For my mother, it meant having five males in the house. The only other female was the dog. It also meant finding unwrapped Limburger in the “fridge.” As you might guess, this situation was a mixed blessing, because while my grandfather was a great guy, as is the case with all of us, sometimes he was difficult to live with. He was also an unbeliever.
       
      My parents are, and were then, believers. It was probably without even thinking about specific scriptural passages, that they chose to live out God’s standards. Their actions honored their parents. They lived within the reality of the command to honor their father and mother. My grandfather lived in our home for ten or eleven years. Their relationship with him was consistent with the requirements of the Fifth Commandment.
       
      Now I can hear some of you saying “That’s great about your parents, but you don’t know mine. They don’t deserve any honor!” And that may well be true. I’ve heard many accounts of less than perfect childhoods. Some say: “I was abused as a child,” or “My father was never around,” or “My mother still drinks.” or even “I have my own life and my family to think about.” Many have had very difficult relationships with parents. The reality we are dealing with though is that God’s call isn’t to honor “deserving” parents, but to honor God by being obedient to Him.
       
      Now we are going to look at a commandment that has created some problems and a fair amount of guilt in the desire of believers to follow it, but simultaneously not wanting their parents to infringe on their lives. There has been some bad teaching regarding the com-mandment, and there have constantly been those who try to find ways around it. We will talk about these issues a little later. First though let's take a look at it.
       
       What does Honor really mean?: Does honoring one’s parents mean having them move in as it did with my grandfather? Or is God talking about something else? Well first, we need to look at the context to understand what is expected.
       
      This commandment is found on the Second Table of the Law in that the primary focus is man-directed. We must be clear that though the balance of the Ten Commandments are man focused, disobedience to them is first God-directed. We must absolutely understand that all sin, no matter how “small,” is first against God - and only second against men. We must recognize this if we are to have a proper understanding of sin. If we truly want to live a holy life, that is separated to God’s standards and away from the world’s, we must admit the seriousness of all sin.
       
      To be continued

       
      If you wish to respond to the author of this study, you may write him directly at GKragen@....  For additional Bible studies by Geoff, visit http://www.cfdevotionals.org/links/authgeof.htm. For more info about the author, visit www.GKRAGEN.com.
       




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Janice Lee
      Anyone who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life in him.” 1 John 3:15
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 26, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        "Anyone who hates his brother is a murderer,
        and you know that no murderer has eternal life in him.”
        1 John 3:15
                                        
        It’s 1979. Francis Schaeffer said:
         
        “ … We find ourselves in a more consistent but uglier world—consistent because people are taking their low view of man to its natural conclusion, and uglier because humanity is drastically dehumanized.
        “The Bible teaches that man is made in the image of God and therefore is unique. Remove that teaching, as humanism has done on both sides of the Iron Curtain, and there is no adequate basis for treating people well.
        “… We are faced today with a flood of personal cruelty. … the Christian consensus gave great freedom without leading to chaos—because society in general functioned within the values given in the Bible, especially the unique value of human life. Now that humanism has taken over, the former freedoms run riot, and individuals, acting on what they are taught, increasingly practice their cruelties without restraint. And why shouldn’t they? If the modern humanistic view of man is correct and man is only a product of chance in a universe that has no ultimate values, why should an individual refrain from being cruel to another person, if that person seems to be standing in his or her way?”  
         
        Schaeffer goes on to identify areas of concern including: Genetic Engineering, Child abuse, Abortion, Infanticide and Euthanasia. What has all this to do with the Sixth Commandment? The subject is the value of human life and God’s concern for how we treat one another.
         
        Up to now, we have been dealing with commands that touch on the divine, those that tie directly to our relationship with God; and the uplifting, the honoring of the Sabbath and parents. But now, we seem to have dropped down into the mundane, that area of life we don’t want to deal with, or even see the need to discuss - killing, stealing, lying, etc. After all, let’s be realistic, how many of us are ever going to need to worry about killing someone, anyway? When was the last time you robbed a bank? Nevertheless, I think we will find though, that these commandments can be very applicable to our daily life.

        As we noted previously, these commandments deal with people’s relationship to people. But once again, keep in mind that any sin is a sin first against God, and only second against others. If we remember any sin is first of all grieving God, then I suspect we would be living our life differently - or at least taking “minor” sins more seriously. The command not to kill isn’t just for society in general, but for us specifically. As with the other commandments, as the issue for us, we will focus on the positive side of not killing.
         

        If you wish to respond to the author of this study, you may write him directly at GKragen@....  For additional Bible studies by Geoff, visit http://www.cfdevotionals.org/links/authgeof.htm. For more info about the author, visit www.GKRAGEN.com.
         





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.