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Dave Sim's blogandmail #226 (April 25th, 2007)

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  • Jeff Tundis
    Wednesday April 25 – _____________________________________________________ Fifteen Impossible Things to Believe Before Breakfast That Make You a Good
    Message 1 of 490 , Apr 25, 2007

      Wednesday April 25 –

      _____________________________________________________

      Fifteen Impossible Things to Believe Before Breakfast That Make You a Good Feminist

      1. A mother who works a full-time job and delegates to strangers the raising of her children eight hours a day, five days a week does just as good a job as a mother who hand-rears her children full time.

      2. It makes great sense for the government to pay 10 to 15,000 dollars a year to fund a daycare space for a child so its mother - who pays perhaps 2,000 dollars in taxes - can be a contributing member of society.

      3. A woman's doctor has more of a valid claim to participate in the decision to abort a fetus than does the father of that fetus.

      4. So long as a woman makes a decision after consulting with her doctor, she is incapable of making an unethical choice.

      5. A car with two steering wheels, two gas pedals and two brakes drives more efficiently than a car with one steering wheel, one gas pedal and one brake which is why marriage should always be an equal partnership.

      6. It is absolutely necessary for women to be allowed to join or participate fully in any gathering place for men, just as it is absolutely necessary that there be women only environments from which men are excluded.

      7. Because it involves taking jobs away from men and giving them to women, affirmative action makes for a fairer and more just society.

      8. It is important to have lower physical standards for women firepersons and women policepersons so that, one day, half of all firepersons and policepersons will be women, thus more effectively protecting the safety of the public.

      9. Affirmative action at colleges and universities needs to be maintained now that more women than men are being enrolled, in order to keep from giving men an unfair advantage academically.

      10. Having ensured that there is no environment for men where women don't belong (see no.6) it is important to have zero tolerance of any expression or action which any woman might regard as sexist to ensure greater freedom for everyone.

      11. Only in a society which maintains a level of 95% of alimony and child support being paid by men to women can men and women be considered as equals.

      12. An airline stewardess who earned $20,000 a year at the time that she married a baseball player earning $6 million a year is entitled, in the event of a divorce, to $3 million for each year of the marriage and probably more.

      13. A man's opinions on how to rear and/or raise a child are invalid because he is not the child's mother. However, his financial obligation is greater because no woman gets pregnant by herself.

      14. Disagreeing with any of these statements makes you anti-woman and/or a misogynist.

      15. Legislature Seats must be allocated to women and women must be allowed to bypass the democratic winnowing process in order to guarantee female representation and, thereby, make democracy fairer.

      _____________________________________________________

      One Dead Light Table

      One Ticking Clock

      Way Too Much Time on His Hands

      And Dave Starts Obsessing:

      "How Am I Going To SELL This Secret Project in

      Today's Comic Book Market?"

      [Oh, and by the way, happy 25th of the month:

      Feminists Get a Free Ride

      In Our Society

      More on Friday]

      Anyway, as luck would have it, my light table having died on Saturday, Monday Pete Dixon of Toronto's Paradise Comics and Paradise Conventions (check out both at www.paradisecomics.com) was coming up for a visit so that we could discuss how the auctions of the CGC-graded Dave Sim file copies of Cerebus were coming along (pretty good! One of the non-file copy Cerebus No.1's in the lowest grade we had, 3.0, went for $400 which is roughly what Overstreet has on it in 9.4) and go over some future strategies. We did that and then we got into some questions I had about "What works and what doesn't work in today's comic-book marketplace with selling new comic books?" I had been hearing a lot about incentive editions of comic books: basically if a retailer orders x number of copies of a new comic book, they get one limited edition copy of the same comic book with a different cover—essentially a rare collectible. Now, automatically most people are going to shut down having read that. That isn't a luxury I have, given that I have to figure out how to break what I see as a monolithic, largely unassailable and completely understandable indifference to independent comics in today's market. Just putting my secret project out there and hoping for the best falls under the heading of Wishful Thinking. To me, it makes more sense to deal with Reality. And, right now, a Comic Store Reality is incentive editions of "hot" comics.

      The way it works is that the publisher guesses roughly what each retailer is going to order without the incentive and then makes the incentive dependent on ordering a number above that. Let's say the best guess is that the retailers will each order 20 copies. The publisher has to decide if the incentive threshold should be 30 copies or 40 copies or 50 copies. If you put the threshold too high you don't get enough retailers participating. If you set the threshold too low then you lower the resale value of the incentive copy because it's not as rare. I asked Pete how this works in practical terms with his ordering. It seems to work pretty well. Depending on who did the incentive cover (always a different artist from the one who did the regular edition cover and usually an artist with more comic store "cachet")(interesting), Pete can literally order 100 copies of a book that he's pretty sure he can only sell 40 of and, if he gets two incentive copies (at a one-incentive-for-every-50-regular-copies ordered threshold) he can make his money back just selling the two incentive copies on the aftermarket. In one sense he's "eating" 60 copies, but in another sense—a real world dollars and cents sense—the extra 60 copies are irrelevant. He can throw them out or give them away or sell them at a nickel each and he's still turning a good profit.

      Essentially what the incentive program does is to make use of the Comic-Store Principles' Prime Directive:

      Successful comic books immediately go up in value in the aftermarket

      And uses that as "leverage" to get more copies of a given comic book into more comic stores. I asked Pete if there are instances where he had guessed he could only sell 40, he ordered 100 to get the incentives and he ended up selling more than 40. Yes, definitely. He could think of one book where he sold 75, other books where he sold out and had to reorder. Well, okay, that makes perfect "real world" sense, then. One of the big problems in today's market with money being universally tight in the stores is that you have to illustrate to store owners that they are not always right when they say that they know how many copies of something to order.

      Which is tough because They ARE Good At It. Guessing how many they need of something, I mean. As someone said to me recently, quoting a Diamond rep, "Most comic-book stores are one bad business deal away from bankruptcy." If you've lasted longer than a year, you're entitled to be a little arrogant—like a Vegas gambler who never loses money at the blackjack tables. Whatever system you have, if you have a winning percentage you are the exception in the field rather than the rule. What someone figured out was that you need an effective crowbar to pry successful retailers out of that "I know how many I need" position and the incentive copy seems to be the way to do it.

      But it doesn't work for independents or, at least, the track record for independents isn't nearly as good because there isn't built-in cachet—or the perception of built-in cachet—in order to get store owners to risk investment capital in ordering what they see as "too many copies". The key is that the incentive book has to go up in value immediately in order to offset even the possibility of losing money "over-ordering" books. The store owner technically pays 80 cents or a dollar for the incentive—the same amount he pays for the regular books—and then sells the incentive for, say, 75 dollars the week after it comes in. "Wolverine" or "Batman" or "Jim Lee" or "Michael Turner" (or, better yet, Wolverine/Batman by Jim Lee and Michael Turner) minimizes the perceived risk. And the rarity is only technically artificial. Do the math. If the incentive threshold is 50 copies and the total orders are 20,000 (which is actually high in today's market) then there are only going to be 400 incentive copies. 400 copies isn't as rare as say Action #1 but it is a very small number when measured against the combined audience of, say, Wolverine, Batman, Jim Lee and Michael Turner. Let's say 10,000 core enthusiasts chasing 400 books. That's what drives up prices and rising prices is Comic Store Principles #1 and 2.

      So the question I'm facing is: is Dave Sim even remotely at the low end of that "cachet" category when it comes to his secret project? Given that the secret project isn't a super-hero comic and it isn't from Marvel (it's more of a Historical Polemic and we all know how white-hot Historical Polemics are with the crowd at, say, Wizard Los Angeles) it's difficult to know even what a reasonable threshold would be for an incentive copy. I asked Pete, having shown him the artwork I had done already, how many he would order for Paradise. 25, but mostly because he already knows me and because of the CGC file copy connection. How many did he think the average store would order? Five. Did he think an incentive copy program could push that number higher? He really didn't know but the way he said he really didn't know it seemed worlds away from WELL, GOSH I CAN'T SEE WHY NOT! I can make the threshold 10 but if my total orders are 3,000 that means there are 300 incentive covers and maybe only 1,000 core enthusiasts. I have a higher ratio of core enthusiasts but the hard numbers are smaller. And you have to factor in that my audience is probably 80% Reading Uber Alles types who wouldn't buy an incentive cover if their lives depended on it versus an 80% Investment Uber Alles percentage in the Wolverine, Batman, Jim Lee and Michael Turner camps.

      And then he explained sketch covers to me. Sketch covers are to incentive books what incentive books are to the regular edition i.e. if you have to order 50 copies to get the incentive edition, you have to order 100 copies to get a sketch cover. Even Pete admits that it doesn't make sense. Presumably it should be the other way around, the sketch cover (being unfinished) should be less valuable than the finished cover on the incentive edition. But, again, you want to talk about Wishful Thinking (how things should work?) or about Reality (how things actually work)? Obviously I'm far more interested in Reality. Sketch covers: gold, Incentive covers: silver or bronze. Got it.

      My best guess, mulling it over the next couple of days after Pete had left, was that this might be the Sketch Cover Era (which might only last for less than a year as the foil covers and hologram covers did in their respective "Eras") and if I could get a hot enough creator to do my sketch cover, I might be able to use the inherent cachet of the sketch cover (and the Pavlovian reaction it excites in most retailers here, today, at the end of the first quarter of 2007) to generate higher or slightly higher sales, my (entirely egocentric) assumption being my secret project will sell if the books are in the stores in quantity. No guarantee of that. Egocentric thinking—particularly in the independent end of things—is usually just Wishful Thinking called something else. If I had to place an actual bet, I think it would probably be more in the Wishful Thinking category, verging on the Severely Unlikely rather than a slam-dunk in the Reality category. And that was when I started thinking about ways that I might be able to get around that while I went about my regular office chores including weighing a package for mailing.

      The weigh scale was dead. I couldn't believe it. I went over and checked the power bar. Yep, plugged in as tight as it can be plugged in. And that was when I looked at the wall socket the power bar was plugged into, and there the power bar plug was, the prongs mostly "out" rather than "in". I had obviously dislodged it while I was trying to extricate the 11 by 17 sheet from the photocopier.

      D'OH!

      A quick trip over to the small appliance place to get my light table back—"Heh! Turned out to be a blown fuse!" (you don't think I was actually going to admit to the truth do you?)—and I was back in business light-table wise with a couple of days left to go in Secret Project Week.

      So that brings you all up to date and now I can actually get to the Mail Answering part of the Blog & Mail tomorrow.

      Tomorrow: Smack! Bam! Pow! Hitting that old Mailbag!

      There's MORE for you

      In Today's BLOG &

      MAAAIIILLL!

      ___________________________________________________

      This may also be viewed at http://davesim.blogspot.com/

      ___________________________________________________

      http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=25ED8C60667D0A95

      ___________________________________________________

      If you wish to contact Dave Sim, you can mail a letter (he does NOT receive emails) to:

      Aardvark Vanaheim, Inc
      P.O. Box 1674
      Station C
      Kitchener, Ontario, Canada N2G 4R2

      Looking for a place to purchase Cerebus phonebooks? You can do so online through Win-Mill Productions -- producers of Following Cerebus. Convenient payment with PayPal:

      http://spectrummagazines.bizland.com/cerebusgn.chtml

      Or, you can check out Mars Import:

      http://www.marsimport.com/display_series.php?ID=142

      Or ask your local retailer to order them for you through Diamond Comics distributors. Here are the Diamond Star System codes:

      Cerebus #1-25 $30.00 STAR00070

      High Society #26-50 $30.00 STAR00071

      Church and State I #52-80 $35.00 STAR00271

      Church and State II #81-111 $35.00 STAR00321

      Jaka's Story #114-136 $30.00 STAR00359

      Melmoth #139-150 $20.00 STAR00431

      Flight #151-162 $20.00 STAR00543

      Women #163-174 $20.00 STAR00849

      Reads #175-186 $20.00 STAR01063

      Minds #187-200 $20.00 STAR01916

      Guys #201-219 $25.00 STAR06972

      Rick's Story #220-231 $20.00 STAR08468

      Going Home I #232-250 $30.00 STAR10981

      Form and Void #251-265 $30.00 STAR13500

      Latter Days #266 - 288 $35.00 AUG031920

      The Last Day #289 - 300 $25.00 APR042189

      Collected Letters - $30 FEB052434

    • Chris W
      ... But ... to ... to ... shit ... grammar ... are ... type ... the ... and ... an ... that ... good ... the ... distance ... is ... artistic ...
      Message 490 of 490 , Jun 2, 2007
        rainmandu2 <rainmandu@...> wrote:
        --- In cerebus@yahoogroups .com, Chris W <show_me68508@ ...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > rainmandu2 <rainmandu@. ..> wrote: --- In cerebus@yahoogroups .com, Chris W
        <show_me68508@ > wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > rainmandu2 <rainmandu@> wrote: --- In
        href="mailto:cerebus%40yahoogroups.com">cerebus@yahoogroups .com, Chris W
        > <show_me68508@ > wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > rainmandu2 <rainmandu@> wrote: --- In cerebus@yahoogroups .com, Chris W
        > > <show_me68508@ > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > rainmandu2 <rainmandu@> wrote: --- In cerebus@yahoogroups .com, Chris W
        > > > <show_me68508@ > wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > rainmandu2 <rainmandu@> wrote: --- In cerebus@yahoogroups .com, Chris W
        > > > > <show_me68508@ > wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Edward Howard <sevenarts@> wrote: On 5/23/07, Dominick Grace
        > > > > > <dgrace2@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > I'd rather knot reed the work of a writer who doesn't no how too spell.
        But
        > to
        > > > say
        > > > > > that
        > > > > > > > > spelling is even close to actual creativity, the ability to tell a good story,
        to
        > > > create
        > > > > > > > > interesting characters, well, that's just laughable. Spelling is important.
        > But,
        > > as
        > > > > I've
        > > > > > said
        > > > > > > > > before, it's not the THING. Your ability to spell will absolutely help you
        to
        > tell
        > > > your
        > > > > > story.
        > > > > > > > > But it won't do shit for your ability to appreciate, understand, interpret,
        > > > comment
        > > > > > on
        > > > > > > > > someone else's story. Other than the part where you point out what a
        shit
        > > > > > > > > speller the other guy is.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Exactly. I would put it this way: good spelling is pretty much essential to
        > > > > > > > telling a good story, and bad spelling will be absolutely distracting to
        > > > > > > > even the best story, and a bad novel might be criticized for its lousy
        > > > > > > >
        spelling and grammar.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Weeeellll . . . yes, generally, if not universally. Certainly, bad spelling/
        grammar
        > as
        > > > the
        > > > > > result of carelessness and/or ignorance (e.g. bad spelling and grammar that
        are
        > not
        > > > > > deliberate parts of the author's strategy) would almost certainly be tagged by
        > > critics,
        > > > > even
        > > > > > ones whio aren't artists themselves. However, there are books in which "bad"
        > > spelling
        > > > > and
        > > > > > grammar are a deliberate strategy. For instance, Russell Hoban's novel Riddley
        > > Walker
        > > > is
        > > > > > set in a post-apocalyptic future world, and one of the ways in which Hoban
        > > presents
        > > > > that
        > > > > > future is in the language spoken then; the novel is narrated in the first person
        > and
        > > is
        > > > > > written in what would unquestionably be viewed as bad English if it were not
        > > > deliberate.
        > > > > > And yes, it does make the novel difficult to read (I can't find my copy, or I'd
        type
        > out
        > > > the
        > > > > > first few sentences for you); indeed, even careful readers of the novel have had
        > > > difficulty
        > > > > > deciphering all of it. I've read essays on the novel that make errors translating
        the
        > > > > > > phonetic or otherwise morphed versions of words back into "our" English,
        and
        > > there
        > > > > > were a couple of terms I never could figure out, either on my own or with help
        > from
        > > > >
        critical
        > > > > > commentaries. Hoban recently (that is, within the last ten years or so) released
        an
        > > > > edition
        > > > > > with a glossary of some of the more difficult terms). It's a narrative strategy
        that
        > > does
        > > > > > create obstacles for readers, so it certainly supports the view that even in a
        good
        > > book
        > > > > > such things can be a distraction, nor does it contradict the general rule about
        the
        > > > > > importance of spelling. But, it's worth note that even the most basic "rules" of
        > > spelling
        > > > > and
        > > > > > grammar CAN be violated, and to good artistic effect (well, in my non-artist's
        > > opinion,
        > > > > > anyway: I think Riddley Walker is brilliant).
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > .
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I knew somebody'd bring up something like that, and you're certainly right. I
        > read
        > > > and
        > > > > > love plenty of books that break the rules of grammar in creative or otherwise
        > > > interesting
        > > > > > ways. Gerhard Roth's stream of consciousness "novel" *The Autobiography of
        > Albert
        > > > > > Einstein* certainly doesn't follow very many rules in that regard. I think we can
        > > agree
        > > > > > though that simply misspelling lots of words that were supposed to be spelled
        > > > correctly
        > > > > > would be a big problem.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > And my larger point was really just that you wouldn't see critics praising a
        > novel
        > > for
        > > > > > spelling things right or following the rules of grammar. Those are just basic
        > matters
        > > > of
        > > > > > craft that aren't worthy of comment unless they're either botched or twisted for
        > > some
        > > > > > creative purpose. I'd place in the same category a lot of the uber-technical
        > > examples
        > > > > that
        > > > > > Chris keeps pulling out in this discussion -- like the white space in and
        distance
        > > > > between
        > > > > > word balloons. Just as the writer needs to think about his spelling, the letterer
        > has
        > > to
        > > > > think
        > > > > > about white space and positioning, but in the
        largest percentage of cases, this
        is
        > > stuff
        > > > > that
        > > > > > should be invisible to the reader, and will not have a noticeable creative or
        artistic
        > > > effect
        > > > > > on the work as a whole. Unless the spelling is either really bad or purposefully
        > > > "wrong",
        > > > > > and unless the balloon spacing and placement is so strange and
        counterintuitive
        > as
        > > to
        > > > > be
        > > > > > distracting, the reader should not and will not notice.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > --
        > > > > > > Ed Howard
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Fargone Records/The Seven Arts: http://www.fargoner ecords.com/
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > .
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Right, it should be invisible to the reader, just like a good writer should have
        > you
        > > > > > interested in the characters and the story. Good example on how it takes
        > > knowledge
        > > > and
        > > > > > experience to realize something's quality. I never realized how good a letterer
        > Tom
        > > > > > Orzechowski (sp?) was until I started studying John Byrne's art.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > *Aerosmith, "Head First"*
        > > > > >
        > > > > > I agree with the first part. Elmore Leonard says that a writer's job is to get out
        of
        > the
        > > > way
        > > > > > of the
        characters and the story
        > > > > >
        > > > > > I disagree with the second part. A writer or artist may be able to recognize
        craft,
        > > > stylistic
        > > > > > ticks (or tricks), but a writer or artist is no more capable of telling whether or
        not
        > a
        > > > thing
        > > > > is
        > > > > > good than anyone else. Because technical proficiency doesn't equal quality, and
        > > > > > recognizing technical proficiency in others doesn't equal recognizing quality.
        > "Wow,
        > > > this
        > > > > > writer spelled everything correctly. Call the Booker nominating committee!"
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Rainmandu
        > > > > >
        > > > > > "Shame for You" - Lily Allen
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > .
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Those stylistic tricks are part of what goes in to making a quality work. "Wow, I
        > > never
        > > > > thought the characters would behave this way, but it makes sense", "Wow, there
        > was
        > > no
        > > > > way of picking out the murderer from the crowd of suspects, but there you go",
        > "That
        > > > story
        > > > > worked because plot point A didn't seem to be going anywhere, until the rest of
        the
        > > > > narrative caught up and then it made a perfect fit". You can recognize that
        Greyshirt
        > > > "The
        > > > > Way Things Work Out" is a brilliant story (which you should, unless you're
        > possessed
        > > by
        > > > > demons), but knowledge of
        the comics medium will be a greater help in
        > > understanding
        > > > > why it's a great story, and having a clue about how Rick Veitch laid out the pages
        to
        > > > keep
        > > > > the various scenes accurate and grounded while connecting threads from top-to-
        > > > bottom
        > > > > and across from page-to-page will grant even more understanding.
        > > > >
        > > > > Yep. No disagreement here. But, once again, none of what you just described is
        > > > > unavailable to non-writers, non-artists. Not sure why you think it is. But it's why
        we
        > > call
        > > > > you a snob.
        > > > >
        > > > > Rainmandu
        > > > >
        > > > > "We Came to Dance" - Ultravox
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > .
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Not sure why you think I think it's unavailable. The rat poison on the top shelf of
        > > > the closet is accessible to a three-year old, just not as accessible as it is to Mommy
        > (who
        > > > has more knowledge and experience). It's a very rare three year-old who will find
        his
        > > way
        > > > to that rat poison, even though it's still right there, in plain sight, just as it is to
        > > everybody
        > > > else.
        > > >
        > > > Great. And now those who know about art, who study art, but (gasp!) don't actually
        > > make
        > > > art, are compared to three year olds. But, oh, no, you're not a snob. You? No way!
        > > >
        > > > Rainmandu
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > .
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Those who haven't grown to that level, or figured out some way to climb there,
        simply
        > > aren't at that level. What's so snobbish? Frankly, I figured you'd give me a harder time
        > for
        > > comparing art to rat poison, or just plain invoking "Mommy".
        > > >
        > > > *working on my own stuff this weekend, none of it has a title*
        > >
        > > It's snobbish because you believe that one who studies will never be as tall as one
        who
        > > MAKES. It's (once again) your ridiculous notion that the opinion of one who MAKES is
        > > always more informed than one who studies, who knows ABOUT. As for our
        comparison,
        > > no, art can be a dangerous thing in the wrong hands. Just ask poor Mr. Hart. But I
        don't
        > > blame Violet. That art looked just like coffee sweetener. Of course, Mr. Hart didn't
        really
        > > partake of that art. Look away,
        Mr. Hart! Look away!
        > >
        > > Rainmandu, losing you
        > >
        > > "Yes or No" - Go-Go's
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > .
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > You're seeing a glass ceiling where one doesn't exist. Someone who figures out how
        to
        > climb up to the rat poison on the top shelf isn't as tall as someone who has grown tall
        > enough to reach it. Someone who grew that tall will also be able to easily reach the
        > cookies conveniently placed on the shelf next to the rat poison, while someone who isn't
        > that tall will have to figure out how to get to that other shelf and expend much more
        effort
        > in doing so. They might even hurt themselves if it's too far of a reach.
        >
        > Are we still talking about this? I thought when I invoked Mr. Hart, we were done. Mr.
        > Hart!
        >
        > Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm gonna go and hit Violet
        up for one of those joints she
        keeps
        > in her purse. You know, the ones she gets from her son. And because I had really
        unusual
        > (to say the least) taste as a teen, I'm going to do my inner teen a favor and try to get me
        > some. Never was attracted to Doralee. And certainly never found Judy all that attractive.
        > But Violet always did it for me. Weird.
        >
        > Rainmandu
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > .
        >
        >
        >
        > Larry Hart? Gary Hart? Hart Fisher? Hart to Hart? Adam Hart? T.J. Hart? Kimberly Hart?
        Missy Hart? Franklin Hart Jr.? Kitty Carlisle Hart? Rodgers and Hart? Phil Hartman? Mary
        Hartman? Hart Too Hot To Hold?

        Now I have to explain my obscure pop culture references? Don't you know that the stress
        that comes from having to explain one's obscure pop culture references has been known
        to lead to the Dark Side?

        If you'll excuse me, I must now meditate. Which means my girlfriend will have to put up
        with my Hugh Grant impression, because "doing" Hugh helps to "center" me. And I guess
        I'll have to miss this week's Franklin Hart, Jr. (F-Hart) Sexual Harassment Workshop.

        Rainmandu

        "Spike" - Tom Petty
        .


        You mean you're not already on the Dark Side?  And all I have to do to get you there is ask you to explain your pop culture references?  Why didn't you say so before, I'd have asked what the hell you were talking about long ago.


        The fish are biting.
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