Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [cerdingas] Digest Number 12

Expand Messages
  • royniblett
    Leof Aeldred, Thanks. That does clarify the matter. It certainly suggests that the early continental Saxon inland vessel was a type of curragh (unless Gibbon
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 26, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Leof Aeldred,

      Thanks. That does clarify the matter. It
      certainly suggests that the early continental
      Saxon inland vessel was a type of curragh
      (unless Gibbon guessed and described a known
      type of "primative" craft) and that inland
      water transport was quite important to them.

      Irish curraghs are certainly sea-going
      vessels capable of crossing the North Sea.

      You wouldn't expect archaeology from a
      curragh (any one know of any curragh or
      coracle finds from the areas where we know
      they were present, Wales and Ireland?),
      whereas plank boats do survive, if used for
      funerals.

      Do you still hold Stockbridge? I am in
      Lockerley.

      Beo Gesund

      Ruadh
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <MBTFX@...>
      To: <cerdingas@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2002 1:08 PM
      Subject: Re: [cerdingas] Digest Number 12


      > Fortunatly I've got volumes one through six
      on a searchable pdf (if anyone would like a
      copy of this file, let me know and I'll
      e-mail it to you). In volume III chapter XXV
      there is this description of the type of
      boats used by 4th/5th century saxon pirates:-
      >
      > "The keel of their large, flat bottomed
      boats were framed of light timber, but the
      sides and upper works consisted only of
      wicker, with a covering of strong hides."
      >
      > Gibbon then goes onto describe them as
      drawing very little draught (which allowed
      them to travel fourscore miles up the major
      rivers of Europe), very light, and
      transportable by wagon over land which was
      how the Saxons moved so swiftly down through
      the whole of Europe "The pirates who entered
      the mouth of the Seine, or of the Rhine,
      might descend with the rapid stream of the
      Rhone, into the Mediterranean".
      >
      > Whilst it could be inferred that these
      boats were also used to journey to Britain,
      it is neither stated nor implied. Gibbon has
      nothing specific to say on the subject of the
      types of boats used to cross the Channel
      >
      > Of course, Gibbon can be notoriously
      unreliable when it comes to infill detail
      rather than historical detail, exercising
      personal opinion in the abscence of
      archaeology so I wouldn't like to say how
      accurate any of his descriptions are, but
      it's an interesting description.
      >
      > Aeldred
      > Thegn of Stockbridge
      > Forleath Theow of Wintanceaster
      > Fortholga of Hamptscire
      > (Ahhhh...I used to love my Regia titles)
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an
      email to:
      > cerdingas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.