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Re: [CVBirds] Names of birds

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  • Les Chibana
    I think a simple solution would be to do as Bruce suggests. If you re reporting a Northern Shrike (NSHR), spell it out at first reference and follow it with
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
      I think a simple solution would be to do as Bruce suggests. If you're
      reporting a Northern Shrike (NSHR), spell it out at first reference and
      follow it with the code that you intend to use. Then you have the
      reference in your message and, thereafter, you can type "NSHR" to
      your heart's content. That way, some of us won't be left wondering
      why you're bothering to report one Northern Shoveler.... which is,
      BTW (by the way), NSHO in BBL (Bird Banding Lab) Code.

      I think Ali's solution is very novel. It would only work in a
      case-sensitive
      scenario (thinking of it in a computer-sense), which our brains do quite
      readily. It communicates more than all caps, or all lower case.

      If you want to use a standardized code form, you should know that
      there are 2 or 3 versions of the 4-letter code and a 6-letter code. The
      4-letter versions that I know of are for the banding lab (BBL) and
      American Ornithologist Union (AOU). Does the Breeding Bird Survey
      (BBS) use it's own 4-letter code? I think the 6-letter code is used by
      some Christmas Bird Counts (CBC). Also, some Breeding Bird Atlas
      (BBA) efforts used their own codes that don't worry about collisions
      (duplicate codes) with the species that don't breed in a given area.
      However, in Santa Clara County (SCL, a county code, BTW, that can
      be found on the Western Field Ornithologists [WFO] website), they
      used SASP for Savannah Sparrow and SGSP for Sage Sparrow.
      Or, maybe it was something else. (In BBL codes, these would be
      SAVS and SAGS.)

      There is an obvious value in using a standardized code when you
      use them in a data crunching application on a computer.

      In regards to the place name code that Ali suggests, there are some
      interesting solutions. At least, I think they're solutions. I also use
      KRP,
      BTW, for Kern River Preserve. In the case of the Don Edwards San
      Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, is DESFBNWR really easier?
      It's shorter, but still too cumbersome to be a useful acronym.

      HTH (hope this helps)

      LECH (Les Chibana)

      BirdNUTZ(tm) - Ornigasmic Birding
      em <les@...>
      web <http://www.birdnutz.com>
      ph 650-949-4335
      fx 650-949-4137
      snailmail: SR2 Box 335, La Honda CA 94020



      On Monday, March 31, 2003, at 04:40 PM, Bruce Webb wrote:

      > Being a mind reader would be a great help in understanding some, since
      > many
      > times the four letter codes posted on this list is not the official 4
      > letter
      > code.
      >
      > Is it such a effort to type out a full bird's name?
      >
      > This discussion group doesn't have any rules about the use of Bird
      > Banding
      > codes in the subject line of messages.
      >
      > 99+ percent of the postings use full bird names. Thank you!
      >
      > Which of these codes used in the past few weeks CORRECTLY refers to a
      > species seen in the Central Valley ?
      >
      > [CVBIRDS] NOSH (2 postings regarding Northern Shrike)
      > [CVBIRDS] another Yolo MOPL update (Mountain Plover)
      > [CVBIRDS] BCHB (regarding a Black-chinned Hummingbird)
      > [CVBIRDS] PGPL at Lodi Sewage Ponds (Pacific Golden-Plover)
      >
      > The answer is: NONE of these were correct banding codes.
      >
      > I think it is perfectly fine to use codes in the body of a message
      > provided
      > the written name of the bird precedes the abbreviation.
      >
      > Now for some more light reading on the subject.
      > http://www.calpoly.edu/~mstiles/code.html
      >
      >
      > Bruce Webb
      > Granite Bay, California
      > BruWebb@...
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Lola Brocksen" <msmlark@...>
      > To: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 10:00 AM
      > Subject: [CVBirds] Names of birds
      >
      >
      >> Morning,
      >> As a novice birder, I need some help with what the TOWAs, YRWAs,
      >> WEKIs,
      >> and so on stand for. Is there a list that I can access that will help
      >> me with these abbreviations.
      >>
      >> Thanks so much
      >>
      >> Lola Brocksen
      >> msmlark@...
      >>
    • david@coursey.com
      What the newspapers have discovered is that EVERYTHING should be spelled-out on first reference, then shorted on subsequent references provided the
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
        What the newspapers have discovered is that EVERYTHING should be spelled-out
        on first reference, then shorted on subsequent references provided the
        abbreviation appears with the first reference. Northern Shrike (NSHR) would
        be correct.

        Abbreviations may be useful in subject lines, however, to get more info in
        less space. It is also helpful to include country with place names. These
        could be abbreviated, usually as a 4-letter code, SJCO for San Joaquin, STAN
        for Stanislaus, YOLO for, well..SAC for Sacramento (three letters).

        Please remember that there are new birders, like myself, reading the list.
        (And always let the AP Stylebook be your guide! :>)

        Jiminy Cricket
        Tracy, SJCO

        ----
        PLEASE NOTE NEW CONTACT INFO
        David Coursey
        Executive Editor, ZDNet AnchorDesk (www.anchordesk.com)
        Author: "Mac OS X for Windows Users: A Switchers' Guide" Peachpit Press,
        2003

        1528 Tamarisk Ln.
        Tracy, CA 95377

        (209) 835-6893 voice


        _____

        From: Les Chibana [mailto:les@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 12:16 AM
        To: central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com

        I think a simple solution would be to do as Bruce suggests. If you're
        reporting a Northern Shrike (NSHR), spell it out at first reference and
        follow it with the code that you intend to use. Then you have the
        reference in your message and, thereafter, you can type "NSHR" to
        your heart's content. That way, some of us won't be left wondering
        why you're bothering to report one Northern Shoveler.... which is,
        BTW (by the way), NSHO in BBL (Bird Banding Lab) Code.

        I think Ali's solution is very novel. It would only work in a
        case-sensitive
        scenario (thinking of it in a computer-sense), which our brains do quite
        readily. It communicates more than all caps, or all lower case.

        If you want to use a standardized code form, you should know that
        there are 2 or 3 versions of the 4-letter code and a 6-letter code. The
        4-letter versions that I know of are for the banding lab (BBL) and
        American Ornithologist Union (AOU). Does the Breeding Bird Survey
        (BBS) use it's own 4-letter code? I think the 6-letter code is used by
        some Christmas Bird Counts (CBC). Also, some Breeding Bird Atlas
        (BBA) efforts used their own codes that don't worry about collisions
        (duplicate codes) with the species that don't breed in a given area.
        However, in Santa Clara County (SCL, a county code, BTW, that can
        be found on the Western Field Ornithologists [WFO] website), they
        used SASP for Savannah Sparrow and SGSP for Sage Sparrow.
        Or, maybe it was something else. (In BBL codes, these would be
        SAVS and SAGS.)

        There is an obvious value in using a standardized code when you
        use them in a data crunching application on a computer.

        In regards to the place name code that Ali suggests, there are some
        interesting solutions. At least, I think they're solutions. I also use
        KRP,
        BTW, for Kern River Preserve. In the case of the Don Edwards San
        Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, is DESFBNWR really easier?
        It's shorter, but still too cumbersome to be a useful acronym.

        HTH (hope this helps)

        LECH (Les Chibana)

        BirdNUTZ(tm) - Ornigasmic Birding
        em <les@...>
        web <http://www.birdnutz.com>
        ph 650-949-4335
        fx 650-949-4137
        snailmail: SR2 Box 335, La Honda CA 94020



        On Monday, March 31, 2003, at 04:40 PM, Bruce Webb wrote:

        > Being a mind reader would be a great help in understanding some, since
        > many
        > times the four letter codes posted on this list is not the official 4
        > letter
        > code.
        >
        > Is it such a effort to type out a full bird's name?
        >
        > This discussion group doesn't have any rules about the use of Bird
        > Banding
        > codes in the subject line of messages.
        >
        > 99+ percent of the postings use full bird names. Thank you!
        >
        > Which of these codes used in the past few weeks CORRECTLY refers to a
        > species seen in the Central Valley ?
        >
        > [CVBIRDS] NOSH (2 postings regarding Northern Shrike)
        > [CVBIRDS] another Yolo MOPL update (Mountain Plover)
        > [CVBIRDS] BCHB (regarding a Black-chinned Hummingbird)
        > [CVBIRDS] PGPL at Lodi Sewage Ponds (Pacific Golden-Plover)
        >
        > The answer is: NONE of these were correct banding codes.
        >
        > I think it is perfectly fine to use codes in the body of a message
        > provided
        > the written name of the bird precedes the abbreviation.
        >
        > Now for some more light reading on the subject.
        > http://www.calpoly.edu/~mstiles/code.html
        >
        >
        > Bruce Webb
        > Granite Bay, California
        > BruWebb@...
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Lola Brocksen" <msmlark@...>
        > To: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 10:00 AM
        > Subject: [CVBirds] Names of birds
        >
        >
        >> Morning,
        >> As a novice birder, I need some help with what the TOWAs, YRWAs,
        >> WEKIs,
        >> and so on stand for. Is there a list that I can access that will help
        >> me with these abbreviations.
        >>
        >> Thanks so much
        >>
        >> Lola Brocksen
        >> msmlark@...
        >>





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      • Jim Gain
        Here s a link to the Bird Banders code if anyone s interested. http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbl/manual/sname.htm This same topic came up in TexBirds yesterday. Jim
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
          Here's a link to the Bird Banders code if anyone's interested.

          http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbl/manual/sname.htm

          This same topic came up in TexBirds yesterday.



          Jim Gain

          Modesto



          -----Original Message-----
          From: Les Chibana [mailto:les@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 12:16 AM
          To: central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [CVBirds] Names of birds



          I think a simple solution would be to do as Bruce suggests. If you're
          reporting a Northern Shrike (NSHR), spell it out at first reference and
          follow it with the code that you intend to use. Then you have the
          reference in your message and, thereafter, you can type "NSHR" to
          your heart's content. That way, some of us won't be left wondering
          why you're bothering to report one Northern Shoveler.... which is,
          BTW (by the way), NSHO in BBL (Bird Banding Lab) Code.

          I think Ali's solution is very novel. It would only work in a
          case-sensitive
          scenario (thinking of it in a computer-sense), which our brains do quite
          readily. It communicates more than all caps, or all lower case.

          If you want to use a standardized code form, you should know that
          there are 2 or 3 versions of the 4-letter code and a 6-letter code. The
          4-letter versions that I know of are for the banding lab (BBL) and
          American Ornithologist Union (AOU). Does the Breeding Bird Survey
          (BBS) use it's own 4-letter code? I think the 6-letter code is used by
          some Christmas Bird Counts (CBC). Also, some Breeding Bird Atlas
          (BBA) efforts used their own codes that don't worry about collisions
          (duplicate codes) with the species that don't breed in a given area.
          However, in Santa Clara County (SCL, a county code, BTW, that can
          be found on the Western Field Ornithologists [WFO] website), they
          used SASP for Savannah Sparrow and SGSP for Sage Sparrow.
          Or, maybe it was something else. (In BBL codes, these would be
          SAVS and SAGS.)

          There is an obvious value in using a standardized code when you
          use them in a data crunching application on a computer.

          In regards to the place name code that Ali suggests, there are some
          interesting solutions. At least, I think they're solutions. I also use
          KRP,
          BTW, for Kern River Preserve. In the case of the Don Edwards San
          Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, is DESFBNWR really easier?
          It's shorter, but still too cumbersome to be a useful acronym.

          HTH (hope this helps)

          LECH (Les Chibana)

          BirdNUTZ(tm) - Ornigasmic Birding
          em <les@...>
          web <http://www.birdnutz.com>
          ph 650-949-4335
          fx 650-949-4137
          snailmail: SR2 Box 335, La Honda CA 94020



          On Monday, March 31, 2003, at 04:40 PM, Bruce Webb wrote:

          > Being a mind reader would be a great help in understanding some, since

          > many
          > times the four letter codes posted on this list is not the official 4
          > letter
          > code.
          >
          > Is it such a effort to type out a full bird's name?
          >
          > This discussion group doesn't have any rules about the use of Bird
          > Banding
          > codes in the subject line of messages.
          >
          > 99+ percent of the postings use full bird names. Thank you!
          >
          > Which of these codes used in the past few weeks CORRECTLY refers to a
          > species seen in the Central Valley ?
          >
          > [CVBIRDS] NOSH (2 postings regarding Northern Shrike)
          > [CVBIRDS] another Yolo MOPL update (Mountain Plover)
          > [CVBIRDS] BCHB (regarding a Black-chinned Hummingbird)
          > [CVBIRDS] PGPL at Lodi Sewage Ponds (Pacific Golden-Plover)
          >
          > The answer is: NONE of these were correct banding codes.
          >
          > I think it is perfectly fine to use codes in the body of a message
          > provided
          > the written name of the bird precedes the abbreviation.
          >
          > Now for some more light reading on the subject.
          > http://www.calpoly.edu/~mstiles/code.html
          >
          >
          > Bruce Webb
          > Granite Bay, California
          > BruWebb@...
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Lola Brocksen" <msmlark@...>
          > To: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 10:00 AM
          > Subject: [CVBirds] Names of birds
          >
          >
          >> Morning,
          >> As a novice birder, I need some help with what the TOWAs, YRWAs,
          >> WEKIs,
          >> and so on stand for. Is there a list that I can access that will
          help
          >> me with these abbreviations.
          >>
          >> Thanks so much
          >>
          >> Lola Brocksen
          >> msmlark@...
          >>






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          Central Valley Birds[CVBirds]messages are searchable
          and archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/messages.

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
          <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mike Feighner
          Les (alias LECH or LESC?), Ali, Bruce, Dennis, Lola, and all: I agree totally with Bruce s point of view. What is the problem with spelling out the full name
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
            Les (alias LECH or LESC?), Ali, Bruce, Dennis, Lola, and all:

            I agree totally with Bruce's point of view. What is the problem with
            spelling out the full name of species? After nearly 10 years of reading
            messages using the banders code, I still have to think for a while about
            what species the reporter is talking about and eventually just give up. I,
            for one, refuse to use the banders code unless it is either a RUFF or a
            SORA.

            Also, we should not resort to artificial abbreviations like the ones in the
            following example posted at one time here over Central Valley Birds: "At
            the preserve this morning we saw no. flickers and several sp. plovers."
            Actually, quick reading would give you the impression that this visit had no
            flickers at all, but did the reporter mean Semipalmated or Spotted Plovers?

            --
            Mike Feighner, Livermore, CA, Alameda County
          • mkgeiger@comcast.net
            As a long-time birder who has not banded birds, I appreciate seeing the bird s name so I don t have to guess. Thanks, Bruce. Maureen Geiger Foster Youth
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
              As a long-time birder who has not banded birds, I appreciate seeing the
              bird's name so I don't have to guess. Thanks, Bruce.

              Maureen Geiger
              Foster Youth Consulting
              916/444-0804
              mkgeiger@...
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Bruce Webb" <BruWebb@...>
              To: "Lola Brocksen" <msmlark@...>
              Cc: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 4:40 PM
              Subject: Re: [CVBirds] Names of birds


              > Being a mind reader would be a great help in understanding some, since
              many
              > times the four letter codes posted on this list is not the official 4
              letter
              > code.
              >
              > Is it such a effort to type out a full bird's name?
              >
              > This discussion group doesn't have any rules about the use of Bird
              Banding
              > codes in the subject line of messages.
              >
              > 99+ percent of the postings use full bird names. Thank you!
              >
              > Which of these codes used in the past few weeks CORRECTLY refers to a
              > species seen in the Central Valley ?
              >
              > [CVBIRDS] NOSH (2 postings regarding Northern Shrike)
              > [CVBIRDS] another Yolo MOPL update (Mountain Plover)
              > [CVBIRDS] BCHB (regarding a Black-chinned Hummingbird)
              > [CVBIRDS] PGPL at Lodi Sewage Ponds (Pacific Golden-Plover)
              >
              > The answer is: NONE of these were correct banding codes.
              >
              > I think it is perfectly fine to use codes in the body of a message
              provided
              > the written name of the bird precedes the abbreviation.
              >
              > Now for some more light reading on the subject.
              > http://www.calpoly.edu/~mstiles/code.html
              >
              >
              > Bruce Webb
              > Granite Bay, California
              > BruWebb@...
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "Lola Brocksen" <msmlark@...>
              > To: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 10:00 AM
              > Subject: [CVBirds] Names of birds
              >
              >
              > > Morning,
              > > As a novice birder, I need some help with what the TOWAs, YRWAs, WEKIs,
              > > and so on stand for. Is there a list that I can access that will help
              > > me with these abbreviations.
              > >
              > > Thanks so much
              > >
              > > Lola Brocksen
              > > msmlark@...
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Central Valley Birds[CVBirds]messages are searchable
              > > and archived at:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/messages.
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Central Valley Birds[CVBirds]messages are searchable
              > and archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/messages.
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
            • Joseph Morlan
              ... Actually there are standard 2 and 3 letter county abbreviations in wide use by field ornithologists in California. The list is at:
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
                On Tue, 1 Apr 2003 02:06:19 -0800, <david@...> wrote:

                >It is also helpful to include country with place names. These
                >could be abbreviated, usually as a 4-letter code, SJCO for San Joaquin, STAN
                >for Stanislaus, YOLO for, well..SAC for Sacramento (three letters).

                Actually there are standard 2 and 3 letter county abbreviations in wide use
                by field ornithologists in California. The list is at:

                http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/counties.html

                I prefer to spell out the full county names when possible, but sometimes
                shorthand is necessary.

                In other news, on yesterdays pelagic we saw many BUSH, RNPH, HEGU and HEGU.
                I also have a BUSH building a nest in my yard and the RNPH in our local
                cornfield was very striking, but the HEGU in the cage at the zoo was quite
                a surprise. The CEWA in my yard got quite a rush from birders, but they
                were disappointed when they arrived to see only a flock of CEWA instead.
                The BTGW was a nice consolation prize. While waiting for the CEWA, several
                people commented on how similar the flight calls are between YEWA and YEWA.
                I'm not sure, but I think the CAWR sometimes imitates the song of the CAWR
                and while checking through our local CATO I found the first state record of
                CATO.

                Today's date is clearly 1/4/03.

                Unambiguously yours,

                --
                Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA 94044 jmorlan@...
                California Birding & new rarities http://fog.ccsf.org/~jmorlan/
                California Bird Records Committee http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/
              • Bruce Deuel
                I know we re overdoing this thread, but Joe s post points out what is wrong with any four-letter code - too many collisions. Whichever 4-letter system one
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
                  I know we're overdoing this thread, but Joe's post points out what is wrong with any four-letter code - too many collisions. Whichever 4-letter system one uses, many "non-standard" codes have to be memorized. Using a 6-letter code, however, causes only 9 collisions among all the full species currently on the North American list. Of the examples Joe used, only Black-throated Gray/Green Warbler would remain confusing. (The correct codes in this case would be BTYWAR and BTNWAR, respectively.) This system is described at http://www.nmt.edu/~shipman/z/nom/6home.html .

                  However, when it comes to posting to e-group lists, I cast my vote with spelling out bird names in full the first time and referencing any codes used to that first fully-spelled out entry.
                  Cheers,
                  Bruce Deuel
                  Redding

                  >>> Joseph Morlan <jmorlan@...> 04/01/03 09:03AM >>>
                  On Tue, 1 Apr 2003 02:06:19 -0800, <david@...> wrote:

                  >It is also helpful to include country with place names. These
                  >could be abbreviated, usually as a 4-letter code, SJCO for San Joaquin, STAN
                  >for Stanislaus, YOLO for, well..SAC for Sacramento (three letters).

                  Actually there are standard 2 and 3 letter county abbreviations in wide use
                  by field ornithologists in California. The list is at:

                  http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/counties.html

                  I prefer to spell out the full county names when possible, but sometimes
                  shorthand is necessary.

                  In other news, on yesterdays pelagic we saw many BUSH, RNPH, HEGU and HEGU.
                  I also have a BUSH building a nest in my yard and the RNPH in our local
                  cornfield was very striking, but the HEGU in the cage at the zoo was quite
                  a surprise. The CEWA in my yard got quite a rush from birders, but they
                  were disappointed when they arrived to see only a flock of CEWA instead.
                  The BTGW was a nice consolation prize. While waiting for the CEWA, several
                  people commented on how similar the flight calls are between YEWA and YEWA.
                  I'm not sure, but I think the CAWR sometimes imitates the song of the CAWR
                  and while checking through our local CATO I found the first state record of
                  CATO.

                  Today's date is clearly 1/4/03.

                  Unambiguously yours,

                  --
                  Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA 94044 jmorlan@...
                  California Birding & new rarities http://fog.ccsf.org/~jmorlan/
                  California Bird Records Committee http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/



                  Central Valley Birds[CVBirds]messages are searchable
                  and archived at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/messages.

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                • Jon Winter
                  I basically agree with Bruce. When you get into six letters to get accuracy in the code, you might as well spell out the AOU names. The codes are useful for
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 1, 2003
                    I basically agree with Bruce. When you get into six letters to get accuracy
                    in the code, you might as well spell out the AOU names. The codes are useful
                    for banding data bases, but little else. Besides, we never use the codes in
                    normal speech, thank God. A Black-throated Green Warbler will always be a
                    Black-throated Green Warbler that way.

                    Jon Winter (2 cents worth)

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Bruce Deuel" <bdeuel@...>
                    To: <central_valley_birds@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 9:35 AM
                    Subject: Re: [CVBirds] Names of birds


                    > I know we're overdoing this thread, but Joe's post points out what is wrong
                    with any four-letter code - too many collisions. Whichever 4-letter system
                    one uses, many "non-standard" codes have to be memorized. Using a 6-letter
                    code, however, causes only 9 collisions among all the full species currently
                    on the North American list. Of the examples Joe used, only Black-throated
                    Gray/Green Warbler would remain confusing. (The correct codes in this case
                    would be BTYWAR and BTNWAR, respectively.) This system is described at
                    http://www.nmt.edu/~shipman/z/nom/6home.html .
                    >
                    > However, when it comes to posting to e-group lists, I cast my vote with
                    spelling out bird names in full the first time and referencing any codes used
                    to that first fully-spelled out entry.
                    > Cheers,
                    > Bruce Deuel
                    > Redding
                    >
                    > >>> Joseph Morlan <jmorlan@...> 04/01/03 09:03AM >>>
                    > On Tue, 1 Apr 2003 02:06:19 -0800, <david@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > >It is also helpful to include country with place names. These
                    > >could be abbreviated, usually as a 4-letter code, SJCO for San Joaquin,
                    STAN
                    > >for Stanislaus, YOLO for, well..SAC for Sacramento (three letters).
                    >
                    > Actually there are standard 2 and 3 letter county abbreviations in wide use
                    > by field ornithologists in California. The list is at:
                    >
                    > http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/counties.html
                    >
                    > I prefer to spell out the full county names when possible, but sometimes
                    > shorthand is necessary.
                    >
                    > In other news, on yesterdays pelagic we saw many BUSH, RNPH, HEGU and HEGU.
                    > I also have a BUSH building a nest in my yard and the RNPH in our local
                    > cornfield was very striking, but the HEGU in the cage at the zoo was quite
                    > a surprise. The CEWA in my yard got quite a rush from birders, but they
                    > were disappointed when they arrived to see only a flock of CEWA instead.
                    > The BTGW was a nice consolation prize. While waiting for the CEWA, several
                    > people commented on how similar the flight calls are between YEWA and YEWA.
                    > I'm not sure, but I think the CAWR sometimes imitates the song of the CAWR
                    > and while checking through our local CATO I found the first state record of
                    > CATO.
                    >
                    > Today's date is clearly 1/4/03.
                    >
                    > Unambiguously yours,
                    >
                    > --
                    > Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA 94044 jmorlan@...
                    > California Birding & new rarities http://fog.ccsf.org/~jmorlan/
                    > California Bird Records Committee http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Central Valley Birds[CVBirds]messages are searchable
                    > and archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/messages.
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Central Valley Birds[CVBirds]messages are searchable
                    > and archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/messages.
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                  • Kevin Enns-Rempel
                    ... Well, some of us occasionally do. I m known to use words like sneg, modo, greg and even burble (brbl). I wouldn t, of course, actually use these
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 2, 2003
                      Jon Winter wrote:

                      > Besides, we never use the codes in normal speech, thank God.

                      Well, some of us occasionally do. I'm known to use words like "sneg," "modo," "greg" and even "burble" (brbl). I wouldn't, of course, actually use these "words" if I was trying to communicate to a broad audience. Most of them aren't pronounceable anyway.

                      Users of programs like AviSys (and its palm device utility) benefit greatly
                      from knowing the 4-letter codes, since that's the fastest way to look up
                      or enter species on the checklist. I agree that the codes have severe limitations (and shouldn't be used in many contexts), but they can be very useful at the same time.

                      --
                      Kevin Enns-Rempel
                      Fresno, CA
                      kennsrem@...
                    • Steve Abbott
                      I agree with Kevin and Bruce and.... I use Pocket Bird Recorder on my Pocket PC in the firld and I can just start writing and the program finds the first name
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 2, 2003
                        I agree with Kevin and Bruce and.... I use Pocket Bird Recorder on my Pocket PC in the firld and
                        I can just start writing and the program finds the first name with the given letter combinations.
                        I have it down to where I enter "gf" and Belted Kingfisher comes up. "Gf" means absolutely
                        nothing to anyone else (unless they're using the same program). Consider the message where I
                        report a "g gf" near Blythe. They ranks would chastise me once for posting such an abbreviation
                        and a second time for not properly reporting a Green Kingfisher in Blythe. THIS IS AN EXAMPLE-NOT
                        AN ACTUAL SIGHTING.

                        My point is, although there are many who are privy to banding codes, they are most likely in the
                        minority of the membership of a group like this and should only be used if properly preceeded with
                        the common name in full as Bruce has suggested.

                        BTW anyone have any bird sightings to share? Can we move on?



                        =====
                        Steve AbbottCitrus Heights, CA
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