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hooded orioles

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  • Manfred Kusch
    Today the first two male Hooded Orioles arrived in my garden. I heard one call a few evenings ago, but was not able to locate it. It appeared to have moved on.
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 2008
      Today the first two male Hooded Orioles arrived in my garden. I heard
      one call a few evenings ago, but was not able to locate it. It appeared
      to have moved on. Also, a male House Wren took up its position next to
      its traditional nesting site in one of the vent holes in the eaves of
      my house today and began to sing. House Wrens had been present off and
      on along the creek and in my garden during much of the winter but had
      completely disappeared during the last 6-8 weeks. Along the creek I
      observed today my FOS Pacific Slope Flycatcher and two Orange-crowned
      Warblers. I have located so far 6 Bushtit nests from as low 3ft in
      wild roses at the edge of the creek to 30ft up in one of my palm trees.
      The Bewick's Wren is sitting on its nest in a hollow tree stump and has
      begun incubating. 3 of the 8 Anna's Hummingbird nests I reported on
      have fledged, a fourth one has just one chick left, its sibling having
      left the nest already. Rufous Hummingbirds persist at my feeders and a
      couple of Black-chinned have joined them. The Swainson's Hawks have
      given up trying to dislodge the Great Horned Owls from their nest of
      last year and have begun building a new nest in a valley oak across the
      creek. The Red-tailed Hawks have finished their nest and have probably
      started laying eggs, but are not incubating yet. Unfortunately, they
      were unable to tolerate the Kestrels who attempted to re-nest in the
      snag they had claimed last year. After days of conflict, the Kestrels
      finally conceded and moved on. A pair of Black Phoebes that has built a
      nest on a small board mounted for that purpose under the eaves of my
      house is already feeding its young. Mourning Doves had a late start but
      are now building nests everywhere, as are the many House Finches. Four
      pairs of Barn Swallows are jockeying for position on my back porch. Two
      Western Screech-Owls spend the days in one and sometimes two of my Wood
      Duck boxes, but have so far not produced any eggs. Four Wood Duck hens
      are sitting on their clutches of 11 to 14 eggs. Two other boxes are
      still accumulating eggs.


      Manfred Kusch
      Davis/Winters
      makusch@...
      707-678-1027.
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