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4 May

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  • emrys
    Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= St.
    Message 1 of 14 , May 2, 2000
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Ethelred of Bardney
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
      ---------------------------------------------------------
      Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
      Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
      Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
      venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


      Life kindly supplied by:
      For All the Saints:
      http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
      These Lives are archived at:
      http://www.egroups.com/group/celt-saints/
      *****************************************
    • ambrós
      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
      Message 2 of 14 , May 2, 2001
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        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Ethelred of Bardney
        * St. Chad of Lichfield
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
        ---------------------------------------------------------
        Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
        Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
        Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
        venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


        Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
        ---------------------------------------------------------

        The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
        form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
        which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
        with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

        In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
        stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
        constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
        only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
        Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
        facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

        Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
        shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
        kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
        the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
        gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

        Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
        recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
        vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
        it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
        did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
        Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
        undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
        were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

        It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
        Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
        for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
        consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
        were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
        of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
        Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

        St. Chad's church, Lichfield
        http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


        Sources:
        ========

        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
        (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

        Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
        Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

        Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
        Methuen & Co.

        For All the Saints:
        http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

        Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page
        http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/celtic.htm

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://www.egroups.com/group/celt-saints/
        *****************************************
      • ambrós
        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
        Message 3 of 14 , May 1, 2002
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          Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Ethelred of Bardney
          * St. Chad of Lichfield
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


          St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
          ---------------------------------------------------------
          Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
          Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
          Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
          venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


          Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
          ---------------------------------------------------------

          The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
          form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
          which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
          with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

          In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
          stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
          constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
          only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
          Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
          facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

          Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
          shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
          kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
          the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
          gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

          Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
          recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
          vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
          it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
          did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
          Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
          undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
          were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

          It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
          Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
          for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
          consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
          were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
          of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
          Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

          St. Chad's church, Lichfield
          http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


          Sources:
          ========

          Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
          (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

          Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
          Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

          Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
          Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

          Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
          Methuen & Co.

          For All the Saints:
          http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

          Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
          http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          *****************************************
        • ambrós
          Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
          Message 4 of 14 , May 2, 2003
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            Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Ethelred of Bardney
            * St. Chad of Lichfield
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


            St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
            ---------------------------------------------------------
            Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
            Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
            Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
            venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


            Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
            ---------------------------------------------------------

            The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
            form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
            which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
            with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

            In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
            stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
            constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
            only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
            Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
            facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

            Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
            shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
            kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
            the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
            gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

            Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
            recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
            vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
            it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
            did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
            Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
            undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
            were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

            It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
            Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
            for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
            consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
            were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
            of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
            Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

            St. Chad's church, Lichfield
            http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


            Sources:
            ========

            Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
            (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

            Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
            Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

            Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
            Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

            Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
            Methuen & Co.

            For All the Saints:
            http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

            Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
            http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            *****************************************
          • emrys@globe.net.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
            Message 5 of 14 , May 3, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Ethelred of Bardney
              * St. Chad of Lichfield
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


              St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
              ---------------------------------------------------------
              Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
              Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
              Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
              venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


              Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
              ---------------------------------------------------------

              The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
              form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
              which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
              with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

              In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
              stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
              constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
              only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
              Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
              facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

              Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
              shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
              kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
              the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
              gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

              Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
              recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
              vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
              it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
              did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
              Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
              undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
              were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

              It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
              Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
              for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
              consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
              were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
              of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
              Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

              St. Chad's church, Lichfield
              http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


              Sources:
              ========

              Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
              (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

              Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
              Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

              Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
              Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

              Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
              Methuen & Co.

              For All the Saints:
              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

              Orthodox Ireland Saints
              http://www.orthodoxireland.com/saints/

              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
              *****************************************
            • emrys@globe.net.nz
              Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
              Message 6 of 14 , May 2, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                * St. Chad of Lichfield
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                ---------------------------------------------------------
                Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                ---------------------------------------------------------

                The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                Sources:
                ========

                Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                Methuen & Co.

                For All the Saints:
                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                These Lives are archived at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                *****************************************
              • emrys@globe.net.nz
                Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                Message 7 of 14 , May 3, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                  * St. Chad of Lichfield
                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                  St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                  ---------------------------------------------------------
                  Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                  Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                  Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                  venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                  Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                  ---------------------------------------------------------

                  The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                  form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                  which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                  with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                  In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                  stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                  constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                  only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                  Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                  facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                  Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                  shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                  kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                  the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                  gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                  Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                  recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                  vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                  it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                  did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                  Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                  undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                  were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                  It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                  Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                  for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                  consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                  were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                  of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                  Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                  St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                  http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                  Sources:
                  ========

                  Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                  (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                  Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                  Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                  Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                  Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                  Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                  Methuen & Co.

                  For All the Saints:
                  http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                  These Lives are archived at:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                  ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                • emrys@globe.net.nz
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 2, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                    * St. Chad of Lichfield
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                    St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                    ---------------------------------------------------------
                    Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                    Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                    Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                    venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                    Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                    ---------------------------------------------------------

                    The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                    form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                    which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                    with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                    In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                    stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                    constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                    only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                    Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                    facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                    Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                    shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                    kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                    the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                    gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                    Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                    recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                    vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                    it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                    did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                    Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                    undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                    were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                    It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                    Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                    for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                    consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                    were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                    of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                    Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                    St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                    http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                    Sources:
                    ========

                    Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                    (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                    Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                    Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                    Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                    Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                    Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                    Methuen & Co.

                    For All the Saints:
                    http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                    These Lives are archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                    ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                  • emrys@globe.net.nz
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 2, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                      * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                      * St. Chad of Lichfield
                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                      St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                      ---------------------------------------------------------
                      Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                      Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                      Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                      venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                      Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                      ---------------------------------------------------------

                      The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                      form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                      which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                      with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                      In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                      stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                      constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                      only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                      Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                      facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                      Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                      shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                      kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                      the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                      gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                      Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                      recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                      vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                      it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                      did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                      Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                      undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                      were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                      It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                      Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                      for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                      consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                      were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                      of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                      Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                      St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                      http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                      Sources:
                      ========

                      Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                      (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                      Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                      Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                      Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                      Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                      Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                      Methuen & Co.

                      For All the Saints:
                      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                      These Lives are archived at:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                    • emrys@globe.net.nz
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                      Message 10 of 14 , May 3, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                        * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                        * St. Chad of Lichfield
                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                        St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                        ---------------------------------------------------------
                        Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                        Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                        Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                        venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                        Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                        ---------------------------------------------------------

                        The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                        form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                        which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                        with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                        In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                        stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                        constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                        only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                        Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                        facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                        Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                        shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                        kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                        the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                        gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                        Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                        recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                        vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                        it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                        did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                        Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                        undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                        were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                        It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                        Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                        for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                        consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                        were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                        of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                        Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                        St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                        http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                        Sources:
                        ========

                        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                        (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                        Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                        Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                        Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                        Methuen & Co.

                        For All the Saints:
                        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                        These Lives are archived at:
                        1. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints

                        2. The website of Kathleen Hanrahan
                        in monthly calendar format
                        http://celticsaints.org/

                        3. Mail Archive
                        http://www.mail-archive.com/celt-saints@yahoogroups.com/
                        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                      • emrys@globe.net.nz
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                        Message 11 of 14 , May 4, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                          * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                          * St. Chad of Lichfield
                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                          St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                          ---------------------------------------------------------
                          Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                          Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                          Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                          venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                          Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                          ---------------------------------------------------------

                          The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                          form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                          which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                          with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                          In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                          stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                          constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                          only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                          Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                          facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                          Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                          shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                          kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                          the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                          gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                          Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                          recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                          vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                          it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                          did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                          Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                          undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                          were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                          It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                          Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                          for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                          consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                          were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                          of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                          Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                          St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                          http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                          Sources:
                          ========

                          Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                          (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                          Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                          Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                          Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                          Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                          Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                          Methuen & Co.

                          For All the Saints:
                          http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                          These Lives are archived at:
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                          ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                        • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                          Christ is Risen! Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                          Message 12 of 14 , May 3, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Christ is Risen!

                            Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                            * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                            * St. Chad of Lichfield
                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                            St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                            ---------------------------------------------------------
                            Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                            Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                            Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                            venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                            Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                            ---------------------------------------------------------

                            The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                            form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                            which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                            with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                            In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                            stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                            constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                            only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                            Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                            facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                            Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                            shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                            kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                            the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                            gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                            Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                            recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                            vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                            it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                            did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                            Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                            undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                            were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                            It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                            Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                            for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                            consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                            were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                            of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                            Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                            St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                            http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                            Sources:
                            ========

                            Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                            (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                            Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                            Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                            Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                            Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                            Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                            Methuen & Co.

                            For All the Saints:
                            http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                            These Lives are archived at:
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                            ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                          • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                            Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                            Message 13 of 14 , May 4, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                              * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                              * St. Chad of Lichfield
                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                              St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                              ---------------------------------------------------------
                              Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                              Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                              Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                              venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                              Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                              ---------------------------------------------------------

                              The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                              form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                              which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                              with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                              In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                              stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                              constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                              only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                              Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                              facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                              Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                              shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                              kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                              the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                              gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                              Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                              recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                              vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                              it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                              did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                              Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                              undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                              were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                              It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                              Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                              for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                              consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                              were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                              of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                              Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                              St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                              http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                              Sources:
                              ========

                              Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                              (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                              Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                              Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                              Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                              Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                              Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                              Methuen & Co.

                              For All the Saints:
                              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                              These Lives are archived at:
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                              ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                            • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                              Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ethelred of Bardney * St. Chad of Lichfield
                              Message 14 of 14 , May 4, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Celtic and Old English Saints 4 May

                                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                                * St. Ethelred of Bardney
                                * St. Chad of Lichfield
                                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                                St. Ethelred of Bardney, King and Monk
                                ---------------------------------------------------------
                                Died 716. Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at
                                Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines). Saint
                                Ethelred is depicted as an abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is
                                venerated at Leominster (Roeder).


                                Translation of St. Chad of Lichfield
                                ---------------------------------------------------------

                                The Venerable Bede says that in his day the tomb of St.Chad was in the
                                form of a small wooden house, with an aperture at the side, through
                                which the faithful might put their hands and obtain dust, which, mixed
                                with water, was used as a cure for both sick humans and animals.

                                In 700 Bishop Headda built a church to contain the tomb, and as the
                                stream of pilgrims continued after the Conquest, a Norman church was
                                constructed in the twelfth century. This second church, however, lasted
                                only about a hundred years before it was replaced by the present Gothic
                                Cathedral, which had a larger East End, including a Lady Chapel, to
                                facilitate the flow of pilgrims.

                                Walter de Langton, who became bishop of Lichfield in 1296, had a marble
                                shrine erected behind the High Altar. Some of the saint's bones were
                                kept in a portable shrine, called a feretory, his head was venerated in
                                the Chapel of St.Chad's Head and other relics were displayed from the
                                gallery in the South Choir Aisle.

                                Numerous miracles were attributed to St.Chad's relics. The earliest is
                                recorded by the Venerable Bede, who recounts that a mentally deranged
                                vagrant took shelter in the church where the saint was buried and left
                                it the next morning restored to sanity. These evidences of his sanctity
                                did not save his shrine from spoliation at the Reformation. At first
                                Bishop Robert Lee persuaded King Henry VIII to allow the tomb to remain
                                undisturbed, but it was not long before the lure of the gold and gems
                                were too much for the king's officers and it was broken up.

                                It is possible that St.Chad's relics still lie behind the altar at
                                Lichfield, but a certain prebend Dudley took away four pieces of bone
                                for safe keeping, and these were treasured by recusants until the
                                consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Birmingham. In 1841 they
                                were enshrined there above the High Altar. The Feast of the Translation
                                of St.Chad is observed in the Midlands on the Thursday after the Fourth
                                Sunday after Easter (Bowen, Wall).

                                St. Chad's church, Lichfield
                                http://www.saintchads.org.uk/home.htm


                                Sources:
                                ========

                                Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                                (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

                                Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                                Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                                Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes.
                                Chicago: Henry Regnery Company.

                                Wall, J. C. (1905). Shrines of British Saints
                                Methuen & Co.

                                For All the Saints: - new active link
                                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

                                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West - new active link
                                http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/saintsa.htm

                                These Lives are archived at:
                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                                ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
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