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19 January

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  • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 19 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Nathalan of Aberdeen * St. Blaithmaic of Iona * St.
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 19, 2013
      Celtic and Old English Saints 19 January

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Nathalan of Aberdeen
      * St. Blaithmaic of Iona
      * St. Albert of Cashel
      * St. Branwallader of Jersey
      * St. Fillan of Strathfilan
      * St. Wulstan of Worcester
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Nathalan of Aberdeen, Bishop
      ------------------------------------------------------
      Born near Aberdeen (Tullicht?), Scotland; died 678.

      Saint Nathalan's name is included in ancient Irish martyrologies, such
      as that of Aengus. The Aberdeen breviary records that Nathalan was a
      nobleman, who possessed a large estate which he gave to the poor in
      order to become an anchorite. Nathalan is especially praised for having
      earned his living by farming, "which approaches nearest to divine
      contemplation." He fed his neighbours from his produce during times of
      famine, and found that farming served him as a type of penance.

      During his pilgrimage to Rome, Nathalan was consecrated bishop by the
      pope, because of his holiness and proficiency in profane and sacred
      learning. He took up residence at Tullicht (now in the diocese of
      Aberdeen), where he built a church, but he continued to use all his
      revenues for the relief of the poor as he had previously. He continued
      to earn his livelihood by the work of his hands, while living austerely,
      and preaching the Gospel. He is also credited with founding the churches
      at Bothelim and Colle.

      His story has elements of folklore, which resembles that of several
      other saints from this part of the world--but with a difference. A
      sudden storm interfered with Nathalan's harvest, and he protested
      against God. When he realised what he had done, he locked his hand and
      leg together in irons and tossed away the key in the River Dee.

      He vowed that his arm would never be free until he had made a pilgrimage
      to Rome. Upon his arrival in the Eternal City, he met a boy who offered
      him a fish for sale. He bought it and recovered the key from the belly
      of the fish. It is said that when the pope heard of this miracle, he
      determined to make him a bishop.

      Many miracles were wrought at his tomb in Tullicht, where his relics
      were preserved until the Deformation. It should be noted that the see of
      Aberdeen had not yet been regularly established; it was first erected at
      Murthlac by Saint Bean (f.d. October 26) at the beginning of the 11th
      century, and transferred to Aberdeen by its fourth bishop, Nectan
      (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson, Farmer, Husenbeth).


      St. Blaithmaic (Blaithmac, Blathmac, Blaithmale) of Iona, Martyr
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      Died c. 823; feast day formerly on January 15. Blaithmac was an Irish
      abbot, who, desiring martyrdom, crossed over to England, which was then
      prey to the heathen Danes.

      His contemporary, Walafrid Strabo (died 849), the German Benedictine of
      Reichenau, narrates his life in a 180-line metrical poem, which has been
      reprinted in Migne's "Patrologia" and Messingham's "Florilegium Insulae
      Sanctorum". According to this
      tradition, Blaithmac was heir to an Irish throne, but entered a
      monastery instead and later became its abbot. Desiring the crown of
      martyrs, he obtained permission to live among his brethren at Iona.

      During the absence of its abbot Dermait, Blaithmac foretold the Viking
      raid on Iona and buried the shrine containing the relics of Saint
      Columba (f.d. June 9). After carefully replacing the sod above the
      burial site, Blaithmac then gave each of the monks the choice of fleeing
      or staying.

      As he was offering the Holy Sacrifice the next morning, the invaders
      rushed in. The whole community was slaughtered, until only Blaithmaic,
      the temporary abbot, was left. He was promised that his life would be
      spared if he gave them the relics. He refused and was hacked to pieces
      by the Danes on the altar steps of the abbey church. When his brethren
      returned, they buried him where he had fallen. The relics were later
      reposed at Dunkeld in 849 (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Montague, Moran,
      O'Hanlon, Skene 2).


      St. Albert of Cashel, Bishop
      ------------------------------------------------------
      7th century; feast day may also be January 8. A 12th-century "vita"
      describes Saint Albert with the pun: "by race an Angle, in speech an
      angel' ("natione Anglus, conversatione angelus"). According to rather
      unreliable accounts, Saint Albert was an Englishman who laboured in or
      was archbishop of Cashel, Ireland, and afterwards evangelized Bavaria
      with Saint Erhard (f.d. January 8). He made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem
      and died shortly after his return to Ratisbon (Regensburg, Germany).
      Unfortunately, the diocese of Cashel did not exist then, so this is an
      obscure point in his life. He is the patron saint of Cashel, Ireland
      (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson, Encyclopaedia).


      St. Branwallader of Jersey, Bishop
      (Branwalader, Branwalator, Brelade, Breward)
      ------------------------------------------------------
      6th century (?); in Cornwall he has feast days on February 9 and June 6;
      January 19 may be the day of the translation of his relics. Saint
      Branwallader was a Celtic or Welsh monk, who is said to have been a
      bishop in Jersey. It is believed that Branwallader worked with Saint
      Samson (f.d. July 28) in Cornwall and the Channel Islands, where he is
      remembered at Jersey in St. Brelade. He may also have travelled with
      Samson to Brittany in northern France. In the Exeter martyrology,
      Branwallader is described a the son of the Cornish king, Kenen.

      King Athelstan, who founded Milton Abbey in Dorset, obtained some of the
      saint's relics (an arm or head) from Breton clerics fleeing Northmen and
      translated them to Milton Abbey in 935. William Worcestre claimed that
      the body itself was at Branston, Devon, and Leland referred to a chapel
      of St. Breward near Seaton.

      The cultus of Saint Branwallader has been strong at least from the 10th
      century, when his name could be found in litanies. His feast was kept at
      Winchester, Exeter, and Cornwall. In Brittany, he has sometimes been
      confused with Saint Brendan (f.d. May 16) and Saint Brannock (f.d.
      January 7) (Benedictines, Farmer).


      St. Fillan of Strathfillan, Abbot
      (Foelan, Foellan, Foilan, Foillan, Fulan),
      ------------------------------------------------------
      Early 8th century; in Ireland his feast is celebrated on January 9 which
      is the day of his death.

      The Irish Fillan, son of Feriach, grandson of King Ceallach of Leinster,
      received the monastic habit in the abbey of Saint Fintan Munnu. Then he
      accompanied his mother, Saint Kentigerna (f.d. January 7), and his
      uncle, Saint Comgan (f.d. October 13), to Scotland, where he became a
      missionary monk. He was perhaps a monk at Taghmon in Wexford and a
      hermit at Pittenweem, Fife, before being chosen as abbot of the nearby
      monastery, which he governed for some years. He retired to Glendochart
      in Perthshire, where he lived a solitary life and built a church. There
      he died and was buried at the place now called Strathfillan in his
      honour. Until the early 19th century, the mentally ill were dipped into
      the pool here and then left all night, tied up, in a corner of Fillan's
      ruined chapel. If they were found loose the next morning, they were
      considered cured.

      Further north, in Ross-shire, there are dedications to his memory and
      that of his uncle (Kilkoan and Killellan). Both Irish and Scottish
      martyrologies recorded his sanctity, and the "Aberdeen Breviary" relates
      some extraordinary miracles performed by him.

      History also records that Robert the Bruce put his hopes of victory at
      Bannockburn into the hands of Saint Fillan. It is reported that he
      brought an arm relic of the saint into battle having passed most of the
      night praying for his intercession. Not surprisingly, the Scottish
      victory at Bannockburn revived and perpetuated his veneration, and his
      feast is still kept in the diocese of Dunkeld.

      The bell and staff of St. Fillan still exist. His pastoral staff, or
      crozier, (the Quigrich), and his bell are in the National Museum in
      Edinburgh. To see the reliquary cover of the crozier, go here
      http://www.cushnieent.force9.co.uk/photogallery1.html

      His "healing stones" are at the Tweed Mill, Dochart Bridge,
      Killin.(Attwater2, Benedictines,Coulson, Farmer, Gill, Montague).


      St. Wulstan of Worcester
      ------------------------------------------
      Bishop of Worcester & confessor, 1008 - 1095. The last bishop of England to
      receive his pastoral staff from a Saxon king, Saint Edward the Confessor;
      one of the very few, by Divine intervention, to have kept his Seat after the
      arrival of William the Conqueror.

      Sources:

      Attwater, D. (1983). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints,
      2nd edition, revised and updated by Catherine Rachel John.
      New York: Penguin Books.

      Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate. (1966).
      The Book of Saints:. NY: Thomas Y. Crowell. .

      Coulson, J. (ed.). (1960). The Saints: A Concise Biographical
      Dictionary. New York: Hawthorn Books.

      D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul,
      Minnesota: Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is
      probably the most useful book to choose to own on
      the Irish saints. The author provides a great deal of
      historical context in which to place the lives of the saints.]

      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Gill, F. C. (1958). The Glorious Company: Lives of Great Christians
      for daily devotion, vol. I. London: Epworth Press.

      Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's Lives of the
      Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints. London: Virtue & Co.

      Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
      Guildford: Billing & Sons.

      Moran, P. Card. (1879). Irish Saints in Great Britian.

      O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

      Skene, W. F. (1875-80). Celtic Scotland, 3 vols. Edinburgh.

      For All the Saints:
      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
      http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/saintsa.htm


      These Lives are archived at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
    • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 19 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Nathalan of Aberdeen * St. Blaithmaic of Iona * St.
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 19, 2014
        Celtic and Old English Saints 19 January

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Nathalan of Aberdeen
        * St. Blaithmaic of Iona
        * St. Albert of Cashel
        * St. Branwallader of Jersey
        * St. Fillan of Strathfilan
        * St. Wulstan of Worcester
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Nathalan of Aberdeen, Bishop
        ------------------------------------------------------
        Born near Aberdeen (Tullicht?), Scotland; died 678.

        Saint Nathalan's name is included in ancient Irish martyrologies, such
        as that of Aengus. The Aberdeen breviary records that Nathalan was a
        nobleman, who possessed a large estate which he gave to the poor in
        order to become an anchorite. Nathalan is especially praised for having
        earned his living by farming, "which approaches nearest to divine
        contemplation." He fed his neighbours from his produce during times of
        famine, and found that farming served him as a type of penance.

        During his pilgrimage to Rome, Nathalan was consecrated bishop by the
        pope, because of his holiness and proficiency in profane and sacred
        learning. He took up residence at Tullicht (now in the diocese of
        Aberdeen), where he built a church, but he continued to use all his
        revenues for the relief of the poor as he had previously. He continued
        to earn his livelihood by the work of his hands, while living austerely,
        and preaching the Gospel. He is also credited with founding the churches
        at Bothelim and Colle.

        His story has elements of folklore, which resembles that of several
        other saints from this part of the world--but with a difference. A
        sudden storm interfered with Nathalan's harvest, and he protested
        against God. When he realised what he had done, he locked his hand and
        leg together in irons and tossed away the key in the River Dee.

        He vowed that his arm would never be free until he had made a pilgrimage
        to Rome. Upon his arrival in the Eternal City, he met a boy who offered
        him a fish for sale. He bought it and recovered the key from the belly
        of the fish. It is said that when the pope heard of this miracle, he
        determined to make him a bishop.

        Many miracles were wrought at his tomb in Tullicht, where his relics
        were preserved until the Deformation. It should be noted that the see of
        Aberdeen had not yet been regularly established; it was first erected at
        Murthlac by Saint Bean (f.d. October 26) at the beginning of the 11th
        century, and transferred to Aberdeen by its fourth bishop, Nectan
        (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson, Farmer, Husenbeth).


        St. Blaithmaic (Blaithmac, Blathmac, Blaithmale) of Iona, Martyr
        ------------------------------------------------------------
        Died c. 823; feast day formerly on January 15. Blaithmac was an Irish
        abbot, who, desiring martyrdom, crossed over to England, which was then
        prey to the heathen Danes.

        His contemporary, Walafrid Strabo (died 849), the German Benedictine of
        Reichenau, narrates his life in a 180-line metrical poem, which has been
        reprinted in Migne's "Patrologia" and Messingham's "Florilegium Insulae
        Sanctorum". According to this
        tradition, Blaithmac was heir to an Irish throne, but entered a
        monastery instead and later became its abbot. Desiring the crown of
        martyrs, he obtained permission to live among his brethren at Iona.

        During the absence of its abbot Dermait, Blaithmac foretold the Viking
        raid on Iona and buried the shrine containing the relics of Saint
        Columba (f.d. June 9). After carefully replacing the sod above the
        burial site, Blaithmac then gave each of the monks the choice of fleeing
        or staying.

        As he was offering the Holy Sacrifice the next morning, the invaders
        rushed in. The whole community was slaughtered, until only Blaithmaic,
        the temporary abbot, was left. He was promised that his life would be
        spared if he gave them the relics. He refused and was hacked to pieces
        by the Danes on the altar steps of the abbey church. When his brethren
        returned, they buried him where he had fallen. The relics were later
        reposed at Dunkeld in 849 (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Montague, Moran,
        O'Hanlon, Skene 2).


        St. Albert of Cashel, Bishop
        ------------------------------------------------------
        7th century; feast day may also be January 8. A 12th-century "vita"
        describes Saint Albert with the pun: "by race an Angle, in speech an
        angel' ("natione Anglus, conversatione angelus"). According to rather
        unreliable accounts, Saint Albert was an Englishman who laboured in or
        was archbishop of Cashel, Ireland, and afterwards evangelized Bavaria
        with Saint Erhard (f.d. January 8). He made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem
        and died shortly after his return to Ratisbon (Regensburg, Germany).
        Unfortunately, the diocese of Cashel did not exist then, so this is an
        obscure point in his life. He is the patron saint of Cashel, Ireland
        (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson, Encyclopaedia).


        St. Branwallader of Jersey, Bishop
        (Branwalader, Branwalator, Brelade, Breward)
        ------------------------------------------------------
        6th century (?); in Cornwall he has feast days on February 9 and June 6;
        January 19 may be the day of the translation of his relics. Saint
        Branwallader was a Celtic or Welsh monk, who is said to have been a
        bishop in Jersey. It is believed that Branwallader worked with Saint
        Samson (f.d. July 28) in Cornwall and the Channel Islands, where he is
        remembered at Jersey in St. Brelade. He may also have travelled with
        Samson to Brittany in northern France. In the Exeter martyrology,
        Branwallader is described a the son of the Cornish king, Kenen.

        King Athelstan, who founded Milton Abbey in Dorset, obtained some of the
        saint's relics (an arm or head) from Breton clerics fleeing Northmen and
        translated them to Milton Abbey in 935. William Worcestre claimed that
        the body itself was at Branston, Devon, and Leland referred to a chapel
        of St. Breward near Seaton.

        The cultus of Saint Branwallader has been strong at least from the 10th
        century, when his name could be found in litanies. His feast was kept at
        Winchester, Exeter, and Cornwall. In Brittany, he has sometimes been
        confused with Saint Brendan (f.d. May 16) and Saint Brannock (f.d.
        January 7) (Benedictines, Farmer).


        St. Fillan of Strathfillan, Abbot
        (Foelan, Foellan, Foilan, Foillan, Fulan),
        ------------------------------------------------------
        Early 8th century; in Ireland his feast is celebrated on January 9 which
        is the day of his death.

        The Irish Fillan, son of Feriach, grandson of King Ceallach of Leinster,
        received the monastic habit in the abbey of Saint Fintan Munnu. Then he
        accompanied his mother, Saint Kentigerna (f.d. January 7), and his
        uncle, Saint Comgan (f.d. October 13), to Scotland, where he became a
        missionary monk. He was perhaps a monk at Taghmon in Wexford and a
        hermit at Pittenweem, Fife, before being chosen as abbot of the nearby
        monastery, which he governed for some years. He retired to Glendochart
        in Perthshire, where he lived a solitary life and built a church. There
        he died and was buried at the place now called Strathfillan in his
        honour. Until the early 19th century, the mentally ill were dipped into
        the pool here and then left all night, tied up, in a corner of Fillan's
        ruined chapel. If they were found loose the next morning, they were
        considered cured.

        Further north, in Ross-shire, there are dedications to his memory and
        that of his uncle (Kilkoan and Killellan). Both Irish and Scottish
        martyrologies recorded his sanctity, and the "Aberdeen Breviary" relates
        some extraordinary miracles performed by him.

        History also records that Robert the Bruce put his hopes of victory at
        Bannockburn into the hands of Saint Fillan. It is reported that he
        brought an arm relic of the saint into battle having passed most of the
        night praying for his intercession. Not surprisingly, the Scottish
        victory at Bannockburn revived and perpetuated his veneration, and his
        feast is still kept in the diocese of Dunkeld.

        The bell and staff of St. Fillan still exist. His pastoral staff, or
        crozier, (the Quigrich), and his bell are in the National Museum in
        Edinburgh. To see the reliquary cover of the crozier, go here
        http://www.cushnieent.force9.co.uk/photogallery1.html

        His "healing stones" are at the Tweed Mill, Dochart Bridge,
        Killin.(Attwater2, Benedictines,Coulson, Farmer, Gill, Montague).


        St. Wulstan of Worcester
        ------------------------------------------
        Bishop of Worcester & confessor, 1008 - 1095. The last bishop of England to
        receive his pastoral staff from a Saxon king, Saint Edward the Confessor;
        one of the very few, by Divine intervention, to have kept his Seat after the
        arrival of William the Conqueror.

        Sources:

        Attwater, D. (1983). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints,
        2nd edition, revised and updated by Catherine Rachel John.
        New York: Penguin Books.

        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate. (1966).
        The Book of Saints:. NY: Thomas Y. Crowell. .

        Coulson, J. (ed.). (1960). The Saints: A Concise Biographical
        Dictionary. New York: Hawthorn Books.

        D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul,
        Minnesota: Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is
        probably the most useful book to choose to own on
        the Irish saints. The author provides a great deal of
        historical context in which to place the lives of the saints.]

        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

        Gill, F. C. (1958). The Glorious Company: Lives of Great Christians
        for daily devotion, vol. I. London: Epworth Press.

        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's Lives of the
        Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints. London: Virtue & Co.

        Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
        Guildford: Billing & Sons.

        Moran, P. Card. (1879). Irish Saints in Great Britian.

        O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

        Skene, W. F. (1875-80). Celtic Scotland, 3 vols. Edinburgh.

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
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