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15 January

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  • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 15 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ita of Limerick * St. Ceolwulf of Lindisfarne * St.
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 15, 2013
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 15 January

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Ita of Limerick
      * St. Ceolwulf of Lindisfarne
      * St. Lleudadd of Bardsey
      * St. Sawl
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Ita of Limerick, Virgin
      (Deirdre, Dorothy, Ida, Ide, Meda, Mida, Ytha)
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      Died c. 570. Saint Ita is the most famous woman saint in Ireland after
      Saint Brigid (f.d. February 1), and is known as the Brigid of Munster.
      She is said to have been of royal lineage, born in one of the baronies
      of Decies near Drum in County Waterford, and called Deirdre.

      An aristocrat wished to marry her, but after praying and fasting for
      three days and with divine help, she convinced her father to allow her
      to lead the life of a maiden. She migrated to Hy Conaill (Killeedy), in
      the western part of Limerick, and founded a community of women dedicated
      to God, which soon attracted many young women. She also founded and
      directed a school. It is said that Bishop Saint Erc gave into her care
      Saint Brendan (f.d. May 16), who would become a famous
      abbot and missionary (though the chronology makes this unlikely). Many
      other Irish saints were taught by her for years. For this reason, she is
      often called "foster-mother of the saints of Ireland."

      Brendan once asked her what three things God especially loved. She
      replied, "True faith in God with a pure heart, a simple life with a
      religious spirit, and open-handedness inspired by charity."

      An Irish lullaby for the Infant Jesus is attributed to her. Saint Ita's
      legend stresses her physical austerities. The principle mark of her
      devotion was the indwelling of the Holy Trinity. Like other monastic
      figures of Ireland, she spent much time in solitude, praying and
      fasting, and the rest of the time in service to those seeking her
      assistance and advice.

      She and her sisters helped to treat the sick of the area. Many miracles
      are also attributed to her including one in which she reattached the
      head to the body of a man who had been decapitated, and another that she
      lived only on food from heaven.

      Although her life is overlaid by much unreliable material, because she
      has been so popular and her "vita" was not written for centuries, there
      is no reason to doubt her existence. There are church dedications and
      place names that recall her both in her
      birthplace and around her monastery. She is also mentioned in the poem
      of Blessed Alcuin (f.d. May 19), and her cultus is still vibrant
      (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Montague, Riain, Walsh,
      White).


      ------------
      An extract from the entry on St. Ita in Edward Sellner's "The Wisdom of
      the Celtic Saints."

      Ita (also Ite or Ide) is, after Brigit, the most famous of Irish women
      soul friends. Her hagiographer even describes her as "a second Brigit."
      A sixth-century abbess, Ita founded a monastery in Country Limerick at
      Killeedy (which means Cell of Church of Ita). She came from the highly
      respected clan of the Deisi, and her father, like Brigit's, was
      resistant to her becoming a nun. After gaining his permission, Ita left
      home and settled at the foot of Sliabh Luachra, where other women from
      neighbouring clans soon joined her. There she founded a monastic school
      for the education of small boys, one of whom was Brendan of Clonfert.
      She evidently had many students, for she is called the "Foster-mother
      of the Saints of Erin."

      Ita's original, some claim, was Deirdre, but because of her thirst
      (iota) for holiness she became known as Ita. This quality may have been
      what drew so many women to join her monastery and families to send their
      sons to her. Ita wanted her students to become acquainted with the
      saints as soul friends. Besides her mentoring, Ita is associated with
      competence in healing and with an asceticism that an angel had to warn
      her about.

      Ita died in approximately 570. Her grave, frequently decorated with
      flowers, is in the ruins of a Romanesque church at Killeedy where her
      monastery once stood. A holy well nearby, almost invisible now, was
      known for centuries for curing smallpox in children and other diseases
      as well.

      Her feast day is January 15.

      Ita's Qualities as a Child, and the Fiery Grace of God

      Ita was born in Ireland of noble lineage, that is, of the stock of
      Feidhlimidh Reachtmiher, by whom all Ireland was supremely ruled for
      many years from the royal fort of Tara. He had three sons, Tiacha, Cond
      and Eochaid. Ita was born of the people called the Deisi, and from her
      baptism on she was filled with the Holy Spirit. All marvelled at her
      childhood purity and behaviour, and her abstinence on the days she had
      to fast. She performed many miracles while she was yet a small child,
      and when she could speak and walk she was prudent, very generous and
      mild toward everyone, gentle and chaste in her language, and
      God-fearing. She consistently attempted to overcome evil and always
      did what she could to promote good. As a young girl she lived at home
      with her parents.

      One day, while Ita was asleep in her room the whole place seemed to be
      on fire. When her neighbours came to give assistance, however, the fire
      in her room seemed to have been extinguished. All marvelled at that,
      and it was said that it was the grace of God that burned about Ita as
      she slept. When she arose from her sleep, her whole appearance seemed
      to be angelic, for she had beauty that has never been seen before or
      since. Her appearance was such that it was the grace of God that burned
      about her. After a short interval, her original appearance returned,
      which certainly was beautiful enough.

      Ita's Dream and the Angel that Helped Discern Its Meaning

      Another day when she went to sleep, Ita saw an angel of the Lord
      approach her and give her three precious stones. When she awoke she did
      not know what that dream signified, and she had a question in her heart
      about it. Then an angel appeared to her and said, "Why are you
      wondering about that dream? Those three precious stoned you saw being
      given to you signify
      the coming of the Blessed Trinity to you, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
      Always in your sleep and vigils the angels of God and holy visions will
      come to you, for you are a temple of God, in body and soul." After
      saying this, the angel left her.

      Ita's Desire to be Consecrated to Christ, and her Parents' Resistance

      Another day Ita came to her mother and announced to her the divine
      precepts the Holy Spirit had taught her. She asked her mother to seek
      her father's permission so that she might consecrate herself to Christ.
      But her father was defiantly opposed to what she desired. The request
      was also very displeasing to her mother , and when others added their
      petitions, Ita's father vehemently refused to give permission. Then Ita,
      filled with the spirit of prophecy, said to all: "Leave my father alone
      for a while. Though he now forbids me to be consecrated to Christ, he
      will come to persuade me and eventually will order me to do so, for he
      will be compelled by Jesus Christ my Lord to let me go wherever I wish
      to serve God." And it happened
      as she had predicted. This is how it came about.

      Not long afterward, Ita fasted for three days and three nights. During
      those days and nights, through dreams and vigils, it became clear that
      the devil was waging several battles against Ita. She, however,
      resisted him in everything, whether she slept or watched. One night,
      the devil, sad and grieving, left Ita with these words: "Alas, Ita, you
      will free yourself from me, and many others too will be delivered."

      A translation by Dorothy Africa of the Vita Sancta Ite from Plummer's Vitae
      Sanctorum Hiberniae is available here:
      http://monasticmatrix.org/cartularium/article.php?textId=3268


      Icons of St. Ita:
      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/ita.htm



      St. Ceolwulf (Ceowulf, Ceolwulph), King, Monk
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      Died 764 (or perhaps a few years earlier). King Ceolwulf of Northumbria,
      England, abdicated his throne after reigning for eight years to become a
      monk at Lindisfarne. Or so some sources would have you believe.
      Apparently the story is deeper, Ceolwulf ascended the throne of
      Northumbria in 729 and just two years later he was captured and forcibly
      tonsured. Later that year he was released and continued his rule.

      Somehow God was working even in the evil of civil unrest. In 737 or 738,
      Ceolwulf did indeed willingly give up civil power in exchange for the
      grace of the evangelical counsels at Lindisfarne. He was so highly
      venerated that the Venerable Bede (f.d. May 25) dedicated his
      "Ecclesiastical History" to "the Most Glorious King Ceolwulf." Bede
      praised Ceolwulf's piety but was reserved regarding the king's ability
      to govern.

      At Lindisfarne, which he endowed so generously that the monks could then
      afford to drink beer or wine on feast days(formerly, like many ascetics,
      they drank only water or milk), Ceolwulf encouraged learning and the
      monastic lifestyle. Ceolwulf was buried near Saint Cuthbert (f.d. March
      20) at the monastery, where miracles proved his sanctity. The relics of
      both saints were translated in 830 to Egred's new church at
      Norham-on-Tweed. Later Ceolwulf's head was transferred to Durham
      (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Gill).


      St. Lleudadd (Laudatus) of Bardsey, Abbot
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      6th century. The Welsh Saint Lleudadd, abbot of Bardsey (Carnarvon),
      accompanied Saint Cadfan (f.d. November 1) to Brittany. He may be
      identical to Saint Lo of Coutances (Lauto; f.d. September 22)
      (Benedictines).


      St. Sawl
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      6th century. Saint Sawl was the Welsh chieftain who fathered Saint Asaph
      (f.d. May 1). The traditions concerning Sawl are very obscure
      (Benedictines).

      * * *

      Another Life from 'Lives of the British Saints' Vol.iv by Sabine
      Baring-Gould.

      This is an early form of Samuel. Sawyl Benuchel was the son of Pabo Post
      Prydyn and he and his brothers Dunawd and Cerwydd are said to have been
      Saints of Bangor Dunawd. He married Gwenasedd, daughter of Rhain
      Rhieinwg, by whom he became the father of St.Asaph. In the Old-Welsh
      pedigrees in Harleian MS 3,859 his name appears as Samuil Pennissel,
      being credited with having a low instead of a high head. He is
      celebrated in the Triads as one of the three Trahawg "Overbearing ones
      of the Isle of Britain." His Feast Day is given as January 15.


      Sources:
      ========

      Attwater, D. (1983). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints,
      2nd edition, revised and updated by Catherine Rachel John.
      New York: Penguin Books.

      Baring-Gould, S. (1914). Lives of the Saints.
      Edinburgh: John Grant.

      Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
      (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

      Delaney, J. J. (1983). Pocket Dictionary of Saints.
      New York: Doubleday Image.

      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Gill, F. C. (1958). The Glorious Company: Lives of Great
      Christians for Daily Devotion, vol. I. London: Epworth Press.

      Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
      Guildford: Billing & Sons.

      Ryan, J. (1931). Irish Monasticism. Dublin: Talbot Press.

      Walsh, M. (ed.). (1985). Butler's Lives of the Saints.
      San Francisco: Harper & Row.

      White, K. E. (1992). Guide to the Saints. NY: Ivy Books.

      For All the Saints:
      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

      These Lives are archived at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
    • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 15 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ita of Limerick * St. Ceolwulf of Lindisfarne * St.
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 17, 2014
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        Celtic and Old English Saints 15 January

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Ita of Limerick
        * St. Ceolwulf of Lindisfarne
        * St. Lleudadd of Bardsey
        * St. Sawl
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Ita of Limerick, Virgin
        (Deirdre, Dorothy, Ida, Ide, Meda, Mida, Ytha)
        ------------------------------------------------------------
        Died c. 570. Saint Ita is the most famous woman saint in Ireland after
        Saint Brigid (f.d. February 1), and is known as the Brigid of Munster.
        She is said to have been of royal lineage, born in one of the baronies
        of Decies near Drum in County Waterford, and called Deirdre.

        An aristocrat wished to marry her, but after praying and fasting for
        three days and with divine help, she convinced her father to allow her
        to lead the life of a maiden. She migrated to Hy Conaill (Killeedy), in
        the western part of Limerick, and founded a community of women dedicated
        to God, which soon attracted many young women. She also founded and
        directed a school. It is said that Bishop Saint Erc gave into her care
        Saint Brendan (f.d. May 16), who would become a famous
        abbot and missionary (though the chronology makes this unlikely). Many
        other Irish saints were taught by her for years. For this reason, she is
        often called "foster-mother of the saints of Ireland."

        Brendan once asked her what three things God especially loved. She
        replied, "True faith in God with a pure heart, a simple life with a
        religious spirit, and open-handedness inspired by charity."

        An Irish lullaby for the Infant Jesus is attributed to her. Saint Ita's
        legend stresses her physical austerities. The principle mark of her
        devotion was the indwelling of the Holy Trinity. Like other monastic
        figures of Ireland, she spent much time in solitude, praying and
        fasting, and the rest of the time in service to those seeking her
        assistance and advice.

        She and her sisters helped to treat the sick of the area. Many miracles
        are also attributed to her including one in which she reattached the
        head to the body of a man who had been decapitated, and another that she
        lived only on food from heaven.

        Although her life is overlaid by much unreliable material, because she
        has been so popular and her "vita" was not written for centuries, there
        is no reason to doubt her existence. There are church dedications and
        place names that recall her both in her
        birthplace and around her monastery. She is also mentioned in the poem
        of Blessed Alcuin (f.d. May 19), and her cultus is still vibrant
        (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Montague, Riain, Walsh,
        White).


        ------------
        An extract from the entry on St. Ita in Edward Sellner's "The Wisdom of
        the Celtic Saints."

        Ita (also Ite or Ide) is, after Brigit, the most famous of Irish women
        soul friends. Her hagiographer even describes her as "a second Brigit."
        A sixth-century abbess, Ita founded a monastery in Country Limerick at
        Killeedy (which means Cell of Church of Ita). She came from the highly
        respected clan of the Deisi, and her father, like Brigit's, was
        resistant to her becoming a nun. After gaining his permission, Ita left
        home and settled at the foot of Sliabh Luachra, where other women from
        neighbouring clans soon joined her. There she founded a monastic school
        for the education of small boys, one of whom was Brendan of Clonfert.
        She evidently had many students, for she is called the "Foster-mother
        of the Saints of Erin."

        Ita's original, some claim, was Deirdre, but because of her thirst
        (iota) for holiness she became known as Ita. This quality may have been
        what drew so many women to join her monastery and families to send their
        sons to her. Ita wanted her students to become acquainted with the
        saints as soul friends. Besides her mentoring, Ita is associated with
        competence in healing and with an asceticism that an angel had to warn
        her about.

        Ita died in approximately 570. Her grave, frequently decorated with
        flowers, is in the ruins of a Romanesque church at Killeedy where her
        monastery once stood. A holy well nearby, almost invisible now, was
        known for centuries for curing smallpox in children and other diseases
        as well.

        Her feast day is January 15.

        Ita's Qualities as a Child, and the Fiery Grace of God

        Ita was born in Ireland of noble lineage, that is, of the stock of
        Feidhlimidh Reachtmiher, by whom all Ireland was supremely ruled for
        many years from the royal fort of Tara. He had three sons, Tiacha, Cond
        and Eochaid. Ita was born of the people called the Deisi, and from her
        baptism on she was filled with the Holy Spirit. All marvelled at her
        childhood purity and behaviour, and her abstinence on the days she had
        to fast. She performed many miracles while she was yet a small child,
        and when she could speak and walk she was prudent, very generous and
        mild toward everyone, gentle and chaste in her language, and
        God-fearing. She consistently attempted to overcome evil and always
        did what she could to promote good. As a young girl she lived at home
        with her parents.

        One day, while Ita was asleep in her room the whole place seemed to be
        on fire. When her neighbours came to give assistance, however, the fire
        in her room seemed to have been extinguished. All marvelled at that,
        and it was said that it was the grace of God that burned about Ita as
        she slept. When she arose from her sleep, her whole appearance seemed
        to be angelic, for she had beauty that has never been seen before or
        since. Her appearance was such that it was the grace of God that burned
        about her. After a short interval, her original appearance returned,
        which certainly was beautiful enough.

        Ita's Dream and the Angel that Helped Discern Its Meaning

        Another day when she went to sleep, Ita saw an angel of the Lord
        approach her and give her three precious stones. When she awoke she did
        not know what that dream signified, and she had a question in her heart
        about it. Then an angel appeared to her and said, "Why are you
        wondering about that dream? Those three precious stoned you saw being
        given to you signify
        the coming of the Blessed Trinity to you, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
        Always in your sleep and vigils the angels of God and holy visions will
        come to you, for you are a temple of God, in body and soul." After
        saying this, the angel left her.

        Ita's Desire to be Consecrated to Christ, and her Parents' Resistance

        Another day Ita came to her mother and announced to her the divine
        precepts the Holy Spirit had taught her. She asked her mother to seek
        her father's permission so that she might consecrate herself to Christ.
        But her father was defiantly opposed to what she desired. The request
        was also very displeasing to her mother , and when others added their
        petitions, Ita's father vehemently refused to give permission. Then Ita,
        filled with the spirit of prophecy, said to all: "Leave my father alone
        for a while. Though he now forbids me to be consecrated to Christ, he
        will come to persuade me and eventually will order me to do so, for he
        will be compelled by Jesus Christ my Lord to let me go wherever I wish
        to serve God." And it happened
        as she had predicted. This is how it came about.

        Not long afterward, Ita fasted for three days and three nights. During
        those days and nights, through dreams and vigils, it became clear that
        the devil was waging several battles against Ita. She, however,
        resisted him in everything, whether she slept or watched. One night,
        the devil, sad and grieving, left Ita with these words: "Alas, Ita, you
        will free yourself from me, and many others too will be delivered."

        A translation by Dorothy Africa of the Vita Sancta Ite from Plummer's Vitae
        Sanctorum Hiberniae is available here:
        http://monasticmatrix.org/cartularium/article.php?textId=3268


        Icons of St. Ita:
        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/ita.htm



        St. Ceolwulf (Ceowulf, Ceolwulph), King, Monk
        ------------------------------------------------------------
        Died 764 (or perhaps a few years earlier). King Ceolwulf of Northumbria,
        England, abdicated his throne after reigning for eight years to become a
        monk at Lindisfarne. Or so some sources would have you believe.
        Apparently the story is deeper, Ceolwulf ascended the throne of
        Northumbria in 729 and just two years later he was captured and forcibly
        tonsured. Later that year he was released and continued his rule.

        Somehow God was working even in the evil of civil unrest. In 737 or 738,
        Ceolwulf did indeed willingly give up civil power in exchange for the
        grace of the evangelical counsels at Lindisfarne. He was so highly
        venerated that the Venerable Bede (f.d. May 25) dedicated his
        "Ecclesiastical History" to "the Most Glorious King Ceolwulf." Bede
        praised Ceolwulf's piety but was reserved regarding the king's ability
        to govern.

        At Lindisfarne, which he endowed so generously that the monks could then
        afford to drink beer or wine on feast days(formerly, like many ascetics,
        they drank only water or milk), Ceolwulf encouraged learning and the
        monastic lifestyle. Ceolwulf was buried near Saint Cuthbert (f.d. March
        20) at the monastery, where miracles proved his sanctity. The relics of
        both saints were translated in 830 to Egred's new church at
        Norham-on-Tweed. Later Ceolwulf's head was transferred to Durham
        (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Gill).


        St. Lleudadd (Laudatus) of Bardsey, Abbot
        ------------------------------------------------------------
        6th century. The Welsh Saint Lleudadd, abbot of Bardsey (Carnarvon),
        accompanied Saint Cadfan (f.d. November 1) to Brittany. He may be
        identical to Saint Lo of Coutances (Lauto; f.d. September 22)
        (Benedictines).


        St. Sawl
        ------------------------------------------------------------
        6th century. Saint Sawl was the Welsh chieftain who fathered Saint Asaph
        (f.d. May 1). The traditions concerning Sawl are very obscure
        (Benedictines).

        * * *

        Another Life from 'Lives of the British Saints' Vol.iv by Sabine
        Baring-Gould.

        This is an early form of Samuel. Sawyl Benuchel was the son of Pabo Post
        Prydyn and he and his brothers Dunawd and Cerwydd are said to have been
        Saints of Bangor Dunawd. He married Gwenasedd, daughter of Rhain
        Rhieinwg, by whom he became the father of St.Asaph. In the Old-Welsh
        pedigrees in Harleian MS 3,859 his name appears as Samuil Pennissel,
        being credited with having a low instead of a high head. He is
        celebrated in the Triads as one of the three Trahawg "Overbearing ones
        of the Isle of Britain." His Feast Day is given as January 15.


        Sources:
        ========

        Attwater, D. (1983). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints,
        2nd edition, revised and updated by Catherine Rachel John.
        New York: Penguin Books.

        Baring-Gould, S. (1914). Lives of the Saints.
        Edinburgh: John Grant.

        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
        (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

        Delaney, J. J. (1983). Pocket Dictionary of Saints.
        New York: Doubleday Image.

        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

        Gill, F. C. (1958). The Glorious Company: Lives of Great
        Christians for Daily Devotion, vol. I. London: Epworth Press.

        Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
        Guildford: Billing & Sons.

        Ryan, J. (1931). Irish Monasticism. Dublin: Talbot Press.

        Walsh, M. (ed.). (1985). Butler's Lives of the Saints.
        San Francisco: Harper & Row.

        White, K. E. (1992). Guide to the Saints. NY: Ivy Books.


        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
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