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30 April

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  • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 30 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cynwl of Wales * St. Erconwald of London * St. Forannan * St.
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 29, 2012
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 30 April

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Cynwl of Wales
      * St. Erconwald of London
      * St. Forannan
      * St. Swithbert the Younger
      * St. Onenn of Brittany
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Cynwl of Wales, Hermit
      ------------------------------------
      6th century. Cynwl, the brother of Saint Deiniol (Daniel), was the first
      bishop of Bangor (Wales.) He lived an austere life in northern Wales.
      Many churches have been dedicated to his honour (Benedictines).

      Troparion of St Cynwl Tone 7
      Thou wast a worthy brother of Bangor's Bishop Deiniol,/ O holy hermit
      Cynwl./ Having passed from thine austere life on earth/ to eternal glory
      in heaven,/ pray to Christ our God for the people of these lands,/ that
      He may grant us His great mercy.


      St. Erconwald (Erkenwald) Bishop of London, Abbot of Chertsey
      --------------------------------------------------------------
      Born in East Anglia; died at Barking, April 30, c. 686-693; second feast
      day on May 13. Erconwald is reputed to have been of royal blood, son of
      Annas or Offa. In 675, Saint Theodore of Canterbury appointed Erconwald
      bishop of the East Saxons with his see in London and extending over
      Essex and Middlesex. His episcopate was the most important in that
      diocese between that of Saint Mellitus and Saint Dunstan. His shrine in
      Saint Paul's Cathedral was a much visited pilgrimage site during the
      Middle Ages, where miracles were reported until the 16th century, but
      little is known of his life except that he
      founded a monastery at Chertsey in Surrey, which he governed, and a
      convent at Barking in Essex to which he appointed as abbess his sister,
      Ethelburga. Erconwald took some part in the reconciliation of Saint
      Theodore with Saint Wilfrid. In Saint Bede's time, miracles were
      recorded as a result of touching the couch used by Erconwald in his
      later years. At his death,
      Erconwald's relics were claimed by Barking, Chertsey, and London; he was
      finally buried in Saint Paul's Cathedral in London, which he had
      enlarged. The relics escaped the fire of 1087 and were placed in the
      crypt. November 14, 1148, they were translated to a new shrine behind
      the high altar, from where they were again moved on February 1, 1326
      (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer)

      Erconwald is portrayed in art as a bishop in a small 'chariot' (the
      Saxon equivalent of a bath chair) in which he travelled because of his
      gout. Sometimes there is a woman touching it or he may be shown with
      Saint Ethelburga of Barking (Roeder). Erconwald is invoked against gout
      (Roeder).

      Another Life:

      Believed to be an early convert of the mission led by S. Mellitus,
      Erconwald founded two religious houses on either side of the Thames, on
      the pattern that was later adopted by S. Benedict Biscop, when he built
      the twin monasteries of St. Peter, Monk Wearmouth and St. Paul, Jarrow.
      The abbey Erconwald built at Chertsey he presided over, as Abbot, but
      the other, at Barking, he gave to his sister St. Ethelburga, recalling
      St. Hildelid from France to train her in the religious life and to guide
      her in the governance of this double monastery of monks and nuns. His
      sister remained very close to him and later, when he was Bishop of
      London, used to accompany him on his journeys. Latterly, he was
      incapacitated by gout and had to be helped into a wheeled litter, the
      fore-runner of the Bath-chair, and the remains of this was preserved in
      Old St Paul's and shown as a relic.

      On the death of St. Cedd, in the plague of 664, Erconwald, who was
      descended from the house of Uffa, the royal family of the East Angles,
      was recommended by King Sebbi, to Archbishop Theodore, as the new Bishop
      of London. His ministry for the next eleven years was to be one of
      reconciliation. His diocese still contained some Britons who had
      remained, when the land was overrun by the Saxons, but the invaders were
      the predominant population. They had received the Christian Faith first
      of all through the Roman clergy sent by St. Gregory, but it had been
      established by the monks from Lindisfarne under St. Cedd, who were of
      the Celtic Church, so the see had a mixed tradition. Moreover, there was
      a certain amount of resistance to the reforms being introduced by St.
      Theodore, and Erconwald had a share in healing the divisions in the
      English Church as a whole, for the quarrel between Wilfrid and Theodore
      was finally settled in Erconwald's house just before the Archbishop's
      death.

      St. Erconwald's sanctity and peacemaking earned him an enduring place in
      the hearts of Londoners, and there are also many stories of miracles. A
      curious tale has been preserved of how, during the rebuilding of St
      Paul's, a coffin was discovered containing the body of a man wearing a
      crown and with a sceptre in his hand. There was no indication to whom
      this well preserved body belonged and, on the following day, St.
      Erconwald said mass for him and then asked who he was. The corpse
      immediately replied that he had been a judge of the New Troy, the
      legendary name for London, and because he was so renowned for his
      exemplary judgements he had earned the name of King of the Judges. The
      bishop asked him where he was now, and the judge answered that, because
      he had died without baptism, he was denied entrance into the Eternal
      City. St. Erconwald was so distressed by this that he began to weep
      saying how much he wished that he could have baptised him in the Name of
      the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost. Some of the tears fell
      upon the face of the righteous judge, and with a great cry of joy, he
      thanked the saint for releasing him from his earthly state by the
      washing with tears in the Name of the Trinity, and straight away his
      body disintegrated into dust.

      St. Erconwald died at his sister's abbey at Barking, and there was
      contention between the priests of St Paul's and the monks of Barking as
      to where he was to be buried. A great storm broke out, and there was
      flooding of the river, but then the sun broke through the clouds,
      seeming to point a golden path to the Cathedral. His body was interred
      in the crypt, but when the church was rebuilt in 1148 it was translated
      to a shrine behind the High Altar. It was a favourite place of
      pilgrimage until the sixteenth century and his feast day was kept on
      April 30th, the day of his death, with great splendour. November 14th
      was observed as the feast of the translation (Baring Gould, Bowen,
      Stanton, Shortt).

      Icon of Saint Erkenwald
      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/erkenwal.htm


      St. Forannan, Abbot
      ---------------------------
      Died 982. A bishop, Saint Forannan left Ireland to join a community at
      the abbey of Waulsort on the Meuse and in 962 became its abbot. He spent
      some times at Gorze studying the monastic observance established by
      Saint John in order to introduce it at Waulsort, which he did most
      successfully (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


      St. Swithbert the Younger, Bishop
      ----------------------------------------------
      Born in England; died 807. Swithbert may have been a monk. He joined the
      missionaries in Germany and eventually became bishop of Werden in
      Westphalia (Benedictines).


      Saint Onenn (Onenna, Onenne) of Brittany
      --------------------------------------------------------
      Onenne was the daughter of King Judael of northern Armorica. She was
      venerated by the local people and become the local patron saint of the
      parish of Trehorenteuc. Living at the end of the 6th century and begining of
      the 7th century, she had a very humble destiny, despite her noble origin.
      She vowed herself to poverty, and became a goose- keeper. Thanks to those
      birds, one day she was saved from an aggressor, the population hearing
      their noise came to her rescue.

      Today, she is still venerated in the Morbihan, in Trehorenteuc (canton of
      Mauron), where the church and a well are dedicated to her name. Pilgrims
      still come to the church builted on the place of her burial. They ask for
      the healing of eye-illnesses. The well, being on private ground, is only
      accessible 2 days a year, during the pilgrimages. In an earlier time, there
      was a procession to that healing-well, with a group of geese walking first
      in the procession. In our days, this tradition is being revitalised.
      (Hippolyte Gancel)



      Sources:
      ========

      Attwater, D. (1983). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints, NY:
      Penguin Books.

      Baring-Gould, S. (1882) The Lives of the Saints
      (15 volumes) John Hodges.

      Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
      (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

      Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
      Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

      Encyclopaedia of Catholic saints, April. (1966).
      Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Gancel, Hippolyte, (2000) Les Saints qui Guerissent en Bretagne", vol 1,
      p.45, ISBN 2-7373-2513-7

      Shortt, L M. (1914). Lives & Legends of English Saints
      Methuen & Co. Ltd.

      Stanton, R A. (1887). Menology of England and Wales
      Burns & Oates.

      For All the Saints:
      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

      These Lives are archived at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints

      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
    • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 30 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cynwl of Wales * St. Erconwald of London * St. Forannan * St.
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 30, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Celtic and Old English Saints 30 April

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Cynwl of Wales
        * St. Erconwald of London
        * St. Forannan
        * St. Swithbert the Younger
        * St. Onenn of Brittany
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Cynwl of Wales, Hermit
        ------------------------------------
        6th century. Cynwl, the brother of Saint Deiniol (Daniel), was the first
        bishop of Bangor (Wales.) He lived an austere life in northern Wales.
        Many churches have been dedicated to his honour (Benedictines).

        Troparion of St Cynwl Tone 7
        Thou wast a worthy brother of Bangor's Bishop Deiniol,/ O holy hermit
        Cynwl./ Having passed from thine austere life on earth/ to eternal glory
        in heaven,/ pray to Christ our God for the people of these lands,/ that
        He may grant us His great mercy.


        St. Erconwald (Erkenwald) Bishop of London, Abbot of Chertsey
        --------------------------------------------------------------
        Born in East Anglia; died at Barking, April 30, c. 686-693; second feast
        day on May 13. Erconwald is reputed to have been of royal blood, son of
        Annas or Offa. In 675, Saint Theodore of Canterbury appointed Erconwald
        bishop of the East Saxons with his see in London and extending over
        Essex and Middlesex. His episcopate was the most important in that
        diocese between that of Saint Mellitus and Saint Dunstan. His shrine in
        Saint Paul's Cathedral was a much visited pilgrimage site during the
        Middle Ages, where miracles were reported until the 16th century, but
        little is known of his life except that he
        founded a monastery at Chertsey in Surrey, which he governed, and a
        convent at Barking in Essex to which he appointed as abbess his sister,
        Ethelburga. Erconwald took some part in the reconciliation of Saint
        Theodore with Saint Wilfrid. In Saint Bede's time, miracles were
        recorded as a result of touching the couch used by Erconwald in his
        later years. At his death,
        Erconwald's relics were claimed by Barking, Chertsey, and London; he was
        finally buried in Saint Paul's Cathedral in London, which he had
        enlarged. The relics escaped the fire of 1087 and were placed in the
        crypt. November 14, 1148, they were translated to a new shrine behind
        the high altar, from where they were again moved on February 1, 1326
        (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer)

        Erconwald is portrayed in art as a bishop in a small 'chariot' (the
        Saxon equivalent of a bath chair) in which he travelled because of his
        gout. Sometimes there is a woman touching it or he may be shown with
        Saint Ethelburga of Barking (Roeder). Erconwald is invoked against gout
        (Roeder).

        Another Life:

        Believed to be an early convert of the mission led by S. Mellitus,
        Erconwald founded two religious houses on either side of the Thames, on
        the pattern that was later adopted by S. Benedict Biscop, when he built
        the twin monasteries of St. Peter, Monk Wearmouth and St. Paul, Jarrow.
        The abbey Erconwald built at Chertsey he presided over, as Abbot, but
        the other, at Barking, he gave to his sister St. Ethelburga, recalling
        St. Hildelid from France to train her in the religious life and to guide
        her in the governance of this double monastery of monks and nuns. His
        sister remained very close to him and later, when he was Bishop of
        London, used to accompany him on his journeys. Latterly, he was
        incapacitated by gout and had to be helped into a wheeled litter, the
        fore-runner of the Bath-chair, and the remains of this was preserved in
        Old St Paul's and shown as a relic.

        On the death of St. Cedd, in the plague of 664, Erconwald, who was
        descended from the house of Uffa, the royal family of the East Angles,
        was recommended by King Sebbi, to Archbishop Theodore, as the new Bishop
        of London. His ministry for the next eleven years was to be one of
        reconciliation. His diocese still contained some Britons who had
        remained, when the land was overrun by the Saxons, but the invaders were
        the predominant population. They had received the Christian Faith first
        of all through the Roman clergy sent by St. Gregory, but it had been
        established by the monks from Lindisfarne under St. Cedd, who were of
        the Celtic Church, so the see had a mixed tradition. Moreover, there was
        a certain amount of resistance to the reforms being introduced by St.
        Theodore, and Erconwald had a share in healing the divisions in the
        English Church as a whole, for the quarrel between Wilfrid and Theodore
        was finally settled in Erconwald's house just before the Archbishop's
        death.

        St. Erconwald's sanctity and peacemaking earned him an enduring place in
        the hearts of Londoners, and there are also many stories of miracles. A
        curious tale has been preserved of how, during the rebuilding of St
        Paul's, a coffin was discovered containing the body of a man wearing a
        crown and with a sceptre in his hand. There was no indication to whom
        this well preserved body belonged and, on the following day, St.
        Erconwald said mass for him and then asked who he was. The corpse
        immediately replied that he had been a judge of the New Troy, the
        legendary name for London, and because he was so renowned for his
        exemplary judgements he had earned the name of King of the Judges. The
        bishop asked him where he was now, and the judge answered that, because
        he had died without baptism, he was denied entrance into the Eternal
        City. St. Erconwald was so distressed by this that he began to weep
        saying how much he wished that he could have baptised him in the Name of
        the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost. Some of the tears fell
        upon the face of the righteous judge, and with a great cry of joy, he
        thanked the saint for releasing him from his earthly state by the
        washing with tears in the Name of the Trinity, and straight away his
        body disintegrated into dust.

        St. Erconwald died at his sister's abbey at Barking, and there was
        contention between the priests of St Paul's and the monks of Barking as
        to where he was to be buried. A great storm broke out, and there was
        flooding of the river, but then the sun broke through the clouds,
        seeming to point a golden path to the Cathedral. His body was interred
        in the crypt, but when the church was rebuilt in 1148 it was translated
        to a shrine behind the High Altar. It was a favourite place of
        pilgrimage until the sixteenth century and his feast day was kept on
        April 30th, the day of his death, with great splendour. November 14th
        was observed as the feast of the translation (Baring Gould, Bowen,
        Stanton, Shortt).

        Icon of Saint Erkenwald
        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/erkenwal.htm


        St. Forannan, Abbot
        ---------------------------
        Died 982. A bishop, Saint Forannan left Ireland to join a community at
        the abbey of Waulsort on the Meuse and in 962 became its abbot. He spent
        some times at Gorze studying the monastic observance established by
        Saint John in order to introduce it at Waulsort, which he did most
        successfully (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


        St. Swithbert the Younger, Bishop
        ----------------------------------------------
        Born in England; died 807. Swithbert may have been a monk. He joined the
        missionaries in Germany and eventually became bishop of Werden in
        Westphalia (Benedictines).


        Saint Onenn (Onenna, Onenne) of Brittany
        --------------------------------------------------------
        Onenne was the daughter of King Judael of northern Armorica. She was
        venerated by the local people and become the local patron saint of the
        parish of Trehorenteuc. Living at the end of the 6th century and begining of
        the 7th century, she had a very humble destiny, despite her noble origin.
        She vowed herself to poverty, and became a goose- keeper. Thanks to those
        birds, one day she was saved from an aggressor, the population hearing
        their noise came to her rescue.

        Today, she is still venerated in the Morbihan, in Trehorenteuc (canton of
        Mauron), where the church and a well are dedicated to her name. Pilgrims
        still come to the church builted on the place of her burial. They ask for
        the healing of eye-illnesses. The well, being on private ground, is only
        accessible 2 days a year, during the pilgrimages. In an earlier time, there
        was a procession to that healing-well, with a group of geese walking first
        in the procession. In our days, this tradition is being revitalised.
        (Hippolyte Gancel)



        Sources:
        ========

        Attwater, D. (1983). The Penguin Dictionary of Saints, NY:
        Penguin Books.

        Baring-Gould, S. (1882) The Lives of the Saints
        (15 volumes) John Hodges.

        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
        (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

        Encyclopaedia of Catholic saints, April. (1966).
        Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

        Gancel, Hippolyte, (2000) Les Saints qui Guerissent en Bretagne", vol 1,
        p.45, ISBN 2-7373-2513-7

        Shortt, L M. (1914). Lives & Legends of English Saints
        Methuen & Co. Ltd.

        Stanton, R A. (1887). Menology of England and Wales
        Burns & Oates.

        For All the Saints: - new active link
        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

        An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West - new active link
        http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/saintsa.htm

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints

        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
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