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28 October

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  • emrys@globe.net.nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona * St. Eadsin, Archbishop of
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 27, 2009
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona
      * St. Eadsin, Archbishop of Canterbury, England,
      Who Crowned King Edward the Confessor
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=



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    • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona * St. Eadsin of Canterbury Who
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 27, 2010
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        Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona
        * St. Eadsin of Canterbury
        Who Crowned King Edward the Confessor
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Eadsin, Archbishop of Canterbury
        -------------------------------------
        (Eadsige, Eadsine)

        Saint Eadsige, known as the bishop of St. Martin's, was promoted to the see
        of Canterbury shortly after the death of Ethelnoth. Some obscurity exists
        about the period at which the church of St. Martin's in
        Canterbury (vide Augustine) gave its title to a bishop. As the names of only
        two bishops consecrated with this title are recorded, it was probably given
        only temporarily. Hook supposes that a bishop of St.
        Martin's was appointed as coadjutor to the archbishop, with authority to
        officiate during his absence. In the time of Cnut, Eadsige, who was then a
        secular priest, had acted as the king's chaplain. For some
        reason which is not explained, Cnut had desired him to become a monk. The
        probability of his election to the archbishopric as the successor of
        Ethelnoth, may have rendered this advisable (vide Odo). Cnut
        accordingly granted Folkestone to the monastery of Christ Church, on
        condition that his chaplain should be admitted to the community, stipulating
        that Eadsige should have the land for life. (1) At a later period Eadsige
        seems to have supported the claim of Earl Godwine of Wessex to Folkestone
        against Christ Church.

        Two years after his election to the archbishopric, Eadsige journeyed to Rome
        and received the pallium from Pope Benedict IX. After the death of
        Harthacnut, Eadsige is said to have assisted Edward the
        Confessor to obtain the kingdom. (2) At Easter, 1043, the Confessor was
        crowned with great pomp at Winchester by Archbishop Eadsige. After the
        ceremony, Eadsige delivered an impressive sermon, " admonishing the king as
        well for his own need as for that of the people." (3)

        Shortly after the coronation, Eadsige was attacked by an illness which
        rendered him unfit for his duties. Fearing lest some unsuitable person
        should obtain his see through bribery or influence, he consulted the king
        and Earl Godwine on the subject, and it was decided that Siward, Abbot of
        Abingdon, should be appointed as his coadjutor. Siward was accordingly
        consecrated in 1044, with the title of bishop of Upsala.

        During Eadsige's illness Siward is said to have appropriated the greater
        part of the archiepiscopal income, and to have provided the sick prelate
        with insufficient funds for his maintenance, so that he was even deprived of
        his necessary food. On account of this injustice, Siward was not promoted to
        succeed Eadsige in the archbishopric, but was made bishop of Rochester. (4)
        This story, however, is open to doubt, for other writers declare that Siward
        was himself attacked by illness, and returned to Abingdon, where he died
        before the archbishop. It is quite probable that Eadsige was dissatisfied
        with the allowance which he received during his illness, and that a dispute
        consequently arose between him and Siward, who was supported by the chapter
        of Christ Church. But as Eadsige again attests charters as archbishop from
        the year 1046, he appears to have recovered sufficiently to rule his see
        some time before his death, which occurred on October 29, 1050.

        The ill-feeling due to the dispute concerning his allowance, probably
        continued to exist between him and the chapter at Christ Church until his
        death, for in his will he left land and a hundred marks to the
        rival monastery of St. Augustine. (5)

        1 Kemble Cod. Dip., 1327.

        2 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

        3 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, 1043.

        4 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

        5 Thorn's Chronologia, col. 2247.

        Source: A.McKilliam, A chronicle of the archbishops of Canterbury
        (London, 1913), 119-121.

        http://www.archive.org/details/chronicleofarchb00mckiiala


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      • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
        Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona * St. Eadsin of Canterbury Who
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 28, 2011
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          Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona
          * St. Eadsin of Canterbury
          Who Crowned King Edward the Confessor
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


          St. Eadsin, Archbishop of Canterbury
          -------------------------------------
          (Eadsige, Eadsine)

          Saint Eadsige, known as the bishop of St. Martin's, was promoted to the see
          of Canterbury shortly after the death of Ethelnoth. Some obscurity exists
          about the period at which the church of St. Martin's in
          Canterbury (vide Augustine) gave its title to a bishop. As the names of only
          two bishops consecrated with this title are recorded, it was probably given
          only temporarily. Hook supposes that a bishop of St.
          Martin's was appointed as coadjutor to the archbishop, with authority to
          officiate during his absence. In the time of Cnut, Eadsige, who was then a
          secular priest, had acted as the king's chaplain. For some
          reason which is not explained, Cnut had desired him to become a monk. The
          probability of his election to the archbishopric as the successor of
          Ethelnoth, may have rendered this advisable (vide Odo). Cnut
          accordingly granted Folkestone to the monastery of Christ Church, on
          condition that his chaplain should be admitted to the community, stipulating
          that Eadsige should have the land for life. (1) At a later period Eadsige
          seems to have supported the claim of Earl Godwine of Wessex to Folkestone
          against Christ Church.

          Two years after his election to the archbishopric, Eadsige journeyed to Rome
          and received the pallium from Pope Benedict IX. After the death of
          Harthacnut, Eadsige is said to have assisted Edward the
          Confessor to obtain the kingdom. (2) At Easter, 1043, the Confessor was
          crowned with great pomp at Winchester by Archbishop Eadsige. After the
          ceremony, Eadsige delivered an impressive sermon, " admonishing the king as
          well for his own need as for that of the people." (3)

          Shortly after the coronation, Eadsige was attacked by an illness which
          rendered him unfit for his duties. Fearing lest some unsuitable person
          should obtain his see through bribery or influence, he consulted the king
          and Earl Godwine on the subject, and it was decided that Siward, Abbot of
          Abingdon, should be appointed as his coadjutor. Siward was accordingly
          consecrated in 1044, with the title of bishop of Upsala.

          During Eadsige's illness Siward is said to have appropriated the greater
          part of the archiepiscopal income, and to have provided the sick prelate
          with insufficient funds for his maintenance, so that he was even deprived of
          his necessary food. On account of this injustice, Siward was not promoted to
          succeed Eadsige in the archbishopric, but was made bishop of Rochester. (4)
          This story, however, is open to doubt, for other writers declare that Siward
          was himself attacked by illness, and returned to Abingdon, where he died
          before the archbishop. It is quite probable that Eadsige was dissatisfied
          with the allowance which he received during his illness, and that a dispute
          consequently arose between him and Siward, who was supported by the chapter
          of Christ Church. But as Eadsige again attests charters as archbishop from
          the year 1046, he appears to have recovered sufficiently to rule his see
          some time before his death, which occurred on October 29, 1050.

          The ill-feeling due to the dispute concerning his allowance, probably
          continued to exist between him and the chapter at Christ Church until his
          death, for in his will he left land and a hundred marks to the
          rival monastery of St. Augustine. (5)

          1 Kemble Cod. Dip., 1327.

          2 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

          3 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, 1043.

          4 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

          5 Thorn's Chronologia, col. 2247.

          Source: A.McKilliam, A chronicle of the archbishops of Canterbury
          (London, 1913), 119-121.

          http://www.archive.org/details/chronicleofarchb00mckiiala


          ********************************
          Suppliers of Icons of Celtic Saints for the church
          or the prayer corner at home.
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints/message/2875
          *********************************


          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          *****************************************
        • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
          Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona * St. Eadsin of Canterbury Who
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 28, 2012
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            Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona
            * St. Eadsin of Canterbury
            Who Crowned King Edward the Confessor
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


            St. Eadsin, Archbishop of Canterbury
            -------------------------------------
            (Eadsige, Eadsine)

            Saint Eadsige, known as the bishop of St. Martin's, was promoted to the see
            of Canterbury shortly after the death of Ethelnoth. Some obscurity exists
            about the period at which the church of St. Martin's in
            Canterbury (vide Augustine) gave its title to a bishop. As the names of only
            two bishops consecrated with this title are recorded, it was probably given
            only temporarily. Hook supposes that a bishop of St.
            Martin's was appointed as coadjutor to the archbishop, with authority to
            officiate during his absence. In the time of Cnut, Eadsige, who was then a
            secular priest, had acted as the king's chaplain. For some
            reason which is not explained, Cnut had desired him to become a monk. The
            probability of his election to the archbishopric as the successor of
            Ethelnoth, may have rendered this advisable (vide Odo). Cnut
            accordingly granted Folkestone to the monastery of Christ Church, on
            condition that his chaplain should be admitted to the community, stipulating
            that Eadsige should have the land for life. (1) At a later period Eadsige
            seems to have supported the claim of Earl Godwine of Wessex to Folkestone
            against Christ Church.

            Two years after his election to the archbishopric, Eadsige journeyed to Rome
            and received the pallium from Pope Benedict IX. After the death of
            Harthacnut, Eadsige is said to have assisted Edward the
            Confessor to obtain the kingdom. (2) At Easter, 1043, the Confessor was
            crowned with great pomp at Winchester by Archbishop Eadsige. After the
            ceremony, Eadsige delivered an impressive sermon, " admonishing the king as
            well for his own need as for that of the people." (3)

            Shortly after the coronation, Eadsige was attacked by an illness which
            rendered him unfit for his duties. Fearing lest some unsuitable person
            should obtain his see through bribery or influence, he consulted the king
            and Earl Godwine on the subject, and it was decided that Siward, Abbot of
            Abingdon, should be appointed as his coadjutor. Siward was accordingly
            consecrated in 1044, with the title of bishop of Upsala.

            During Eadsige's illness Siward is said to have appropriated the greater
            part of the archiepiscopal income, and to have provided the sick prelate
            with insufficient funds for his maintenance, so that he was even deprived of
            his necessary food. On account of this injustice, Siward was not promoted to
            succeed Eadsige in the archbishopric, but was made bishop of Rochester. (4)
            This story, however, is open to doubt, for other writers declare that Siward
            was himself attacked by illness, and returned to Abingdon, where he died
            before the archbishop. It is quite probable that Eadsige was dissatisfied
            with the allowance which he received during his illness, and that a dispute
            consequently arose between him and Siward, who was supported by the chapter
            of Christ Church. But as Eadsige again attests charters as archbishop from
            the year 1046, he appears to have recovered sufficiently to rule his see
            some time before his death, which occurred on October 29, 1050.

            The ill-feeling due to the dispute concerning his allowance, probably
            continued to exist between him and the chapter at Christ Church until his
            death, for in his will he left land and a hundred marks to the
            rival monastery of St. Augustine. (5)

            1 Kemble Cod. Dip., 1327.

            2 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

            3 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, 1043.

            4 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

            5 Thorn's Chronologia, col. 2247.

            Source: A.McKilliam, A chronicle of the archbishops of Canterbury
            (London, 1913), 119-121.

            http://www.archive.org/details/chronicleofarchb00mckiiala


            ********************************
            Suppliers of Icons of Celtic Saints for the church
            or the prayer corner at home.
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints/message/2875
            *********************************


            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            *****************************************
          • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona * St. Eadsin of Canterbury Who
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 28, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Celtic and Old English Saints 28 October

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Dorbheneus, Abbot of Iona
              * St. Eadsin of Canterbury
              Who Crowned King Edward the Confessor
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


              St. Eadsin, Archbishop of Canterbury
              -------------------------------------
              (Eadsige, Eadsine)

              Saint Eadsige, known as the bishop of St. Martin's, was promoted to the see
              of Canterbury shortly after the death of Ethelnoth. Some obscurity exists
              about the period at which the church of St. Martin's in
              Canterbury (vide Augustine) gave its title to a bishop. As the names of only
              two bishops consecrated with this title are recorded, it was probably given
              only temporarily. Hook supposes that a bishop of St.
              Martin's was appointed as coadjutor to the archbishop, with authority to
              officiate during his absence. In the time of Cnut, Eadsige, who was then a
              secular priest, had acted as the king's chaplain. For some
              reason which is not explained, Cnut had desired him to become a monk. The
              probability of his election to the archbishopric as the successor of
              Ethelnoth, may have rendered this advisable (vide Odo). Cnut
              accordingly granted Folkestone to the monastery of Christ Church, on
              condition that his chaplain should be admitted to the community, stipulating
              that Eadsige should have the land for life. (1) At a later period Eadsige
              seems to have supported the claim of Earl Godwine of Wessex to Folkestone
              against Christ Church.

              Two years after his election to the archbishopric, Eadsige journeyed to Rome
              and received the pallium from Pope Benedict IX. After the death of
              Harthacnut, Eadsige is said to have assisted Edward the
              Confessor to obtain the kingdom. (2) At Easter, 1043, the Confessor was
              crowned with great pomp at Winchester by Archbishop Eadsige. After the
              ceremony, Eadsige delivered an impressive sermon, " admonishing the king as
              well for his own need as for that of the people." (3)

              Shortly after the coronation, Eadsige was attacked by an illness which
              rendered him unfit for his duties. Fearing lest some unsuitable person
              should obtain his see through bribery or influence, he consulted the king
              and Earl Godwine on the subject, and it was decided that Siward, Abbot of
              Abingdon, should be appointed as his coadjutor. Siward was accordingly
              consecrated in 1044, with the title of bishop of Upsala.

              During Eadsige's illness Siward is said to have appropriated the greater
              part of the archiepiscopal income, and to have provided the sick prelate
              with insufficient funds for his maintenance, so that he was even deprived of
              his necessary food. On account of this injustice, Siward was not promoted to
              succeed Eadsige in the archbishopric, but was made bishop of Rochester. (4)
              This story, however, is open to doubt, for other writers declare that Siward
              was himself attacked by illness, and returned to Abingdon, where he died
              before the archbishop. It is quite probable that Eadsige was dissatisfied
              with the allowance which he received during his illness, and that a dispute
              consequently arose between him and Siward, who was supported by the chapter
              of Christ Church. But as Eadsige again attests charters as archbishop from
              the year 1046, he appears to have recovered sufficiently to rule his see
              some time before his death, which occurred on October 29, 1050.

              The ill-feeling due to the dispute concerning his allowance, probably
              continued to exist between him and the chapter at Christ Church until his
              death, for in his will he left land and a hundred marks to the
              rival monastery of St. Augustine. (5)

              1 Kemble Cod. Dip., 1327.

              2 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

              3 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, 1043.

              4 William of Malmesbury, De Gestis Pont. Ang., p. 34.

              5 Thorn's Chronologia, col. 2247.

              Source: A.McKilliam, A chronicle of the archbishops of Canterbury
              (London, 1913), 119-121.

              http://www.archive.org/details/chronicleofarchb00mckiiala


              ********************************
              Suppliers of Icons of Celtic Saints for the church
              or the prayer corner at home.
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints/message/2875
              *********************************


              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
              *****************************************
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