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9 April

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  • emrys`nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 7, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
      * St. Madrun of Wales
      * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
      * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Dotto, Abbot
      ----------------------------------------------------
      6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a
      monastery in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have
      lived to a very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


      St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
      ----------------------------------------------------
      5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19.
      According to a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer
      and wife of Ynyr Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent
      (Monmouthshire). Following the battle described by Nennius in
      which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled with the youngest of her
      three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn and then to Cornwall.
      She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are dedicated to her
      honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where she was
      buried (Benedictines, Farmer).


      St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
      ----------------------------------------------------
      Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
      Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large
      community were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin,
      subprior; Elfgete, deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick,
      acolytes; Grimkeld and Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians
      (Benedictines).


      St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
      ----------------------------------------------------
      Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead).
      He and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that
      same year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20).
      Hedda and his monks are venerated as martyrs, even though modern
      scholars believe that the motivation for the murders was booty and
      not the hatred of Christianity. In the later Middle Ages the
      "Hedda stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs.
      Holes were cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an
      altar at which to offer the Holy Sacrifice --a custom started by abbot
      Godric. In the 17th century, pilgrims would put their fingers into the
      holes, perhaps to take dust as a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).


      Lives kindly supplied by:
      For All the Saints:
      http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
      Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page
      http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/celtic.htm
      These Lives are archived at:
      http://www.egroups.com/group/celt-saints/
      *****************************************
    • ambrós
      Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 8, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
        * St. Madrun of Wales
        * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
        * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Dotto, Abbot
        ----------------------------------------------------
        6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
        in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
        very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


        St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
        ----------------------------------------------------
        5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
        a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
        Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
        battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
        with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
        and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
        dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
        she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

        Another Life:
        The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
        windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
        gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
        sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
        its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
        the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
        old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
        Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
        continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

        Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
        the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
        Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
        Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
        preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
        She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
        part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
        Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
        St. Non.

        Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
        Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
        doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
        grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
        carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
        by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
        was persuaded to enter a convent.

        Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
        landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
        Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
        besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
        with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
        Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
        as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
        Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



        St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
        ----------------------------------------------------
        Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
        Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
        were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
        deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
        Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


        St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
        ----------------------------------------------------
        Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
        and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
        year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
        his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
        stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
        cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
        say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
        pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
        a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

        Sources:
        ========

        Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
        (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
        (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
        Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
        London: Virtue & Co.

        John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

        For All the Saints:
        http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

        Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page
        http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/celtic.htm

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        *****************************************
      • ambrós
        Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 7, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
          * St. Madrun of Wales
          * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
          * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


          St. Dotto, Abbot
          ----------------------------------------------------
          6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
          in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
          very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


          St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
          ----------------------------------------------------
          5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
          a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
          Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
          battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
          with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
          and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
          dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
          she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

          Another Life:
          The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
          windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
          gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
          sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
          its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
          the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
          old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
          Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
          continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

          Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
          the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
          Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
          Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
          preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
          She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
          part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
          Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
          St. Non.

          Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
          Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
          doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
          grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
          carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
          by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
          was persuaded to enter a convent.

          Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
          landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
          Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
          besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
          with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
          Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
          as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
          Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



          St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
          ----------------------------------------------------
          Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
          Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
          were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
          deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
          Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


          St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
          ----------------------------------------------------
          Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
          and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
          year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
          his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
          stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
          cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
          say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
          pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
          a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

          Sources:
          ========

          Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
          (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

          Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
          (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

          Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
          Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

          Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
          Oxford: Oxford University Press.

          Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
          Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
          London: Virtue & Co.

          John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

          For All the Saints:
          http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

          Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
          http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          *****************************************
        • ambrós
          Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 7, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
            * St. Madrun of Wales
            * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
            * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


            St. Dotto, Abbot
            ----------------------------------------------------
            6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
            in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
            very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


            St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
            ----------------------------------------------------
            5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
            a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
            Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
            battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
            with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
            and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
            dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
            she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

            Another Life:
            The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
            windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
            gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
            sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
            its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
            the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
            old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
            Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
            continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

            Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
            the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
            Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
            Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
            preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
            She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
            part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
            Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
            St. Non.

            Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
            Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
            doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
            grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
            carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
            by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
            was persuaded to enter a convent.

            Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
            landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
            Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
            besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
            with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
            Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
            as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
            Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



            St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
            ----------------------------------------------------
            Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
            Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
            were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
            deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
            Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


            St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
            ----------------------------------------------------
            Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
            and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
            year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
            his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
            stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
            cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
            say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
            pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
            a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

            Sources:
            ========

            Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
            (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

            Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
            (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

            Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
            Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

            Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
            Oxford: Oxford University Press.

            Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
            Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
            London: Virtue & Co.

            John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

            For All the Saints:
            http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

            Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
            http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            *****************************************
          • emrys@globe.net.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 7, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
              * St. Madrun of Wales
              * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
              * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


              St. Dotto, Abbot
              ----------------------------------------------------
              6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
              in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
              very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


              St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
              ----------------------------------------------------
              5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
              a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
              Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
              battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
              with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
              and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
              dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
              she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

              Another Life:
              The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
              windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
              gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
              sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
              its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
              the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
              old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
              Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
              continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

              Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
              the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
              Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
              Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
              preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
              She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
              part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
              Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
              St. Non.

              Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
              Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
              doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
              grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
              carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
              by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
              was persuaded to enter a convent.

              Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
              landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
              Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
              besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
              with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
              Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
              as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
              Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



              St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
              ----------------------------------------------------
              Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
              Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
              were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
              deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
              Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


              St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
              ----------------------------------------------------
              Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
              and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
              year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
              his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
              stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
              cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
              say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
              pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
              a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

              Sources:
              ========

              Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
              (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

              Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
              (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

              Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
              Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

              Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
              Oxford: Oxford University Press.

              Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
              Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
              London: Virtue & Co.

              John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

              For All the Saints:
              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

              Orthodox Ireland Saints
              http://www.orthodoxireland.com/saints/

              An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
              http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
              *****************************************
            • emrys@globe.net.nz
              Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 7, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                * St. Madrun of Wales
                * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                St. Dotto, Abbot
                ----------------------------------------------------
                6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                ----------------------------------------------------
                5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                Another Life:
                The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                St. Non.

                Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                was persuaded to enter a convent.

                Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                ----------------------------------------------------
                Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                ----------------------------------------------------
                Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                Sources:
                ========

                Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                London: Virtue & Co.

                John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                For All the Saints:
                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                These Lives are archived at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                *****************************************
              • emrys@globe.net.nz
                Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 7, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                  * St. Madrun of Wales
                  * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                  * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                  St. Dotto, Abbot
                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                  in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                  very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                  St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                  a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                  Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                  battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                  with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                  and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                  dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                  she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                  Another Life:
                  The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                  windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                  gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                  sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                  its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                  the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                  old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                  Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                  continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                  Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                  the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                  Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                  Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                  preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                  She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                  part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                  Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                  St. Non.

                  Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                  Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                  doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                  grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                  carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                  by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                  was persuaded to enter a convent.

                  Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                  landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                  Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                  besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                  with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                  Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                  as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                  Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                  St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                  Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                  were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                  deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                  Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                  St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                  and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                  year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                  his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                  stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                  cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                  say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                  pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                  a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                  Sources:
                  ========

                  Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                  (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                  Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                  (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                  Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                  Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                  Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                  Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                  Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                  London: Virtue & Co.

                  John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                  For All the Saints:
                  http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                  An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                  http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                  These Lives are archived at:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                  ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                • emrys@globe.net.nz
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 9, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                    * St. Madrun of Wales
                    * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                    * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                    St. Dotto, Abbot
                    ----------------------------------------------------
                    6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                    in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                    very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                    St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                    ----------------------------------------------------
                    5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                    a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                    Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                    battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                    with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                    and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                    dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                    she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                    Another Life:
                    The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                    windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                    gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                    sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                    its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                    the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                    old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                    Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                    continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                    Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                    the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                    Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                    Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                    preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                    She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                    part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                    Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                    St. Non.

                    Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                    Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                    doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                    grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                    carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                    by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                    was persuaded to enter a convent.

                    Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                    landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                    Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                    besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                    with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                    Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                    as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                    Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                    St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                    ----------------------------------------------------
                    Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                    Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                    were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                    deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                    Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                    St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                    ----------------------------------------------------
                    Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                    and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                    year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                    his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                    stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                    cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                    say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                    pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                    a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                    Sources:
                    ========

                    Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                    (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                    Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                    (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                    Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                    Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                    Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                    Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                    Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                    Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                    London: Virtue & Co.

                    John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                    For All the Saints:
                    http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                    An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                    http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                    These Lives are archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                    ������������������������������������


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • emrys@globe.net.nz
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 8, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                      * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                      * St. Madrun of Wales
                      * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                      * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                      St. Dotto, Abbot
                      ----------------------------------------------------
                      6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                      in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                      very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                      St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                      ----------------------------------------------------
                      5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                      a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                      Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                      battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                      with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                      and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                      dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                      she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                      Another Life:
                      The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                      windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                      gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                      sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                      its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                      the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                      old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                      Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                      continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                      Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                      the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                      Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                      Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                      preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                      She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                      part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                      Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                      St. Non.

                      Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                      Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                      doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                      grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                      carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                      by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                      was persuaded to enter a convent.

                      Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                      landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                      Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                      besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                      with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                      Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                      as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                      Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                      St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                      ----------------------------------------------------
                      Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                      Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                      were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                      deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                      Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                      St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                      ----------------------------------------------------
                      Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                      and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                      year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                      his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                      stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                      cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                      say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                      pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                      a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                      Sources:
                      ========

                      Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                      (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                      Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                      (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                      Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                      Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                      Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                      Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                      London: Virtue & Co.

                      John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                      For All the Saints:
                      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                      These Lives are archived at:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                    • emrys@globe.net.nz
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 8, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                        * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                        * St. Madrun of Wales
                        * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                        * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                        St. Dotto, Abbot
                        ----------------------------------------------------
                        6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                        in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                        very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                        St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                        ----------------------------------------------------
                        5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                        a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                        Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                        battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                        with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                        and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                        dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                        she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                        Another Life:
                        The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                        windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                        gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                        sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                        its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                        the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                        old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                        Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                        continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                        Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                        the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                        Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                        Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                        preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                        She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                        part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                        Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                        St. Non.

                        Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                        Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                        doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                        grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                        carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                        by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                        was persuaded to enter a convent.

                        Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                        landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                        Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                        besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                        with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                        Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                        as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                        Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                        St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                        ----------------------------------------------------
                        Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                        Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                        were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                        deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                        Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                        St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                        ----------------------------------------------------
                        Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                        and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                        year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                        his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                        stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                        cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                        say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                        pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                        a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                        Sources:
                        ========

                        Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                        (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                        Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                        (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                        Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                        London: Virtue & Co.

                        John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                        For All the Saints:
                        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                        An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                        These Lives are archived at:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                      • emrys@globe.net.nz
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 8, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                          * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                          * St. Madrun of Wales
                          * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                          * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                          St. Dotto, Abbot
                          ----------------------------------------------------
                          6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                          in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                          very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                          St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                          ----------------------------------------------------
                          5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                          a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                          Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                          battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                          with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                          and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                          dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                          she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                          Another Life:
                          The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                          windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                          gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                          sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                          its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                          the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                          old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                          Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                          continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                          Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                          the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                          Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                          Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                          preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                          She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                          part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                          Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                          St. Non.

                          Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                          Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                          doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                          grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                          carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                          by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                          was persuaded to enter a convent.

                          Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                          landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                          Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                          besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                          with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                          Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                          as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                          Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                          St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                          ----------------------------------------------------
                          Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                          Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                          were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                          deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                          Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                          St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                          ----------------------------------------------------
                          Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                          and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                          year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                          his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                          stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                          cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                          say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                          pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                          a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                          Sources:
                          ========

                          Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                          (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                          Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                          (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                          Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                          Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                          Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                          Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                          Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                          Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                          London: Virtue & Co.

                          John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                          For All the Saints:
                          http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                          An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                          http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                          These Lives are archived at:
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                          ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                        • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                          Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 8, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                            * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                            * St. Madrun of Wales
                            * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                            * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                            St. Dotto, Abbot
                            ----------------------------------------------------
                            6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                            in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                            very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                            St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                            ----------------------------------------------------
                            5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                            a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                            Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                            battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                            with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                            and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                            dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                            she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                            Another Life:
                            The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                            windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                            gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                            sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                            its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                            the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                            old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                            Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                            continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                            Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                            the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                            Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                            Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                            preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                            She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                            part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                            Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                            St. Non.

                            Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                            Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                            doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                            grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                            carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                            by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                            was persuaded to enter a convent.

                            Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                            landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                            Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                            besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                            with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                            Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                            as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                            Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                            St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                            ----------------------------------------------------
                            Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                            Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                            were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                            deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                            Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                            St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                            ----------------------------------------------------
                            Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                            and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                            year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                            his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                            stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                            cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                            say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                            pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                            a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                            Sources:
                            ========

                            Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                            (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                            Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                            (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                            Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                            Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                            Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                            Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                            Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                            Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                            London: Virtue & Co.

                            John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                            For All the Saints:
                            http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                            An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                            http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                            These Lives are archived at:
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                            ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                          • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                            Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 9, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                              * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                              * St. Madrun of Wales
                              * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                              * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                              St. Dotto, Abbot
                              ----------------------------------------------------
                              6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                              in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                              very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                              St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                              ----------------------------------------------------
                              5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                              a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                              Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                              battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                              with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                              and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                              dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                              she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                              Another Life:
                              The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                              windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                              gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                              sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                              its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                              the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                              old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                              Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                              continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                              Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                              the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                              Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                              Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                              preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                              She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                              part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                              Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                              St. Non.

                              Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                              Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                              doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                              grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                              carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                              by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                              was persuaded to enter a convent.

                              Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                              landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                              Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                              besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                              with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                              Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                              as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                              Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                              St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                              ----------------------------------------------------
                              Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                              Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                              were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                              deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                              Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                              St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                              ----------------------------------------------------
                              Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                              and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                              year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                              his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                              stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                              cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                              say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                              pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                              a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                              Sources:
                              ========

                              Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                              (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                              Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                              (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                              Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                              Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                              Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                              Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                              Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                              Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                              London: Virtue & Co.

                              John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                              For All the Saints:
                              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                              An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                              http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                              These Lives are archived at:
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                              ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                            • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                              Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands * St. Madrun of Wales * St. Theodore
                              Message 14 of 14 , Apr 9, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Celtic and Old English Saints 9 April

                                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                                * St. Dotto of the Orkney Islands
                                * St. Madrun of Wales
                                * St. Theodore of Croyland & his Companion Martyrs
                                * St. Hedda of Peterborough and 84 Monk Martyrs
                                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                                St. Dotto, Abbot
                                ----------------------------------------------------
                                6th century. Saint Dotto is said to have been the abbot of a monastery
                                in the Orkney Islands that is named after him and to have lived to a
                                very venerable age (Benedictines, Husenbeth).


                                St. Madrun (Materiana), Widow
                                ----------------------------------------------------
                                5th century; a second feast is celebrated on October 19. According to
                                a dubious "vita," Madrun was the daughter of Vortimer and wife of Ynyr
                                Gwent, ruler of the area around Caerwent (Monmouthshire). Following the
                                battle described by Nennius in which Vortigern was killed, Madrun fled
                                with the youngest of her three children, Ceidio, first to Carn Fadryn
                                and then to Cornwall. She was either Welsh or Cornish, and churches are
                                dedicated to her honour in Tintagel and Minster (near Boscastle), where
                                she was buried (Benedictines, Farmer).

                                Another Life:
                                The church perched on the cliffs above Tintagel, with its fine Norman
                                windows and lichen covered gravestones, buttressed against the Atlantic
                                gales, is dedicated to St. Materiana. The village, lying below in a more
                                sheltered spot, now makes a living from visitors to the headland, with
                                its romantic remains of castle and monastery. The headland is Tintagel,
                                the village, in fact, Trevenna, and the church an outlying Chapel of the
                                old Priory at Minster, in which was the shrine of St. Materiana. The
                                Austin Friars have gone, and so has the shrine, but the Priory Church
                                continues as the mother church of Boscastle.

                                Materiana was more a refugee than a missionary, but that has been one of
                                the ways the faith has been spread since the earliest days of the
                                Gospel. We read in the Acts of the Apostles, after the martyrdom of S.
                                Stephen: "Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere
                                preaching the word", and that appears to be the case with St. Materiana.
                                She was the daughter of Vortimer, marrying Ynyr Gwent, who ruled that
                                part of Monmonthshire east of the Usk river and in Wales was called
                                Madrum or Madryn. Her sister Anna married Cynyr and was the mother of
                                St. Non.

                                Ynyr was responsible for establishing St. Tathan and his school at
                                Caerwent, and the holy man became the family's spiritual director. No
                                doubt Madrum learnt a great deal from St. Tathan but her daughter Tegiwg
                                grew up a self willed young lady and ran off with a handsome young
                                carpenter. The carpenter, however, deserted her, and she was found dead
                                by St. Beuno's shepherds. The good bishop resuscitated her, and she then
                                was persuaded to enter a convent.

                                Soon after this, the native Britons rose in revolt against the Irish
                                landowners, and Ynyr fled with his wife Madrun to the fortress of
                                Vortigern in Carnarvenshire, in a valley beneath Snowdon. The rebels
                                besieged and set fire to the castle, Ynyr was killed and Madrun escaped
                                with her son Ceidio in her arms and made a new home in Cornwall. In
                                Wales, Trawsfynydd, and in Cornwall, both Minster and Tintagel claim her
                                as their foundress. Her day in Wales and Cornwall is April 9th (Baring
                                Gould, Fisher, C R John, Bowen).



                                St. Theodore and Companions, Martyrs
                                ----------------------------------------------------
                                Died c. 870. This is another group martyred by the invading Danes.
                                Theodore, abbot of Croyland, and several others of his large community
                                were mentioned by name: Askega, prior; Swethin, subprior; Elfgete,
                                deacon; Savinus, subdeacon; Egdred and Ulrick, acolytes; Grimkeld and
                                Agamund (Argamund), both centenarians (Benedictines).


                                St. Hedda (Haeddi) and Companions, Martyrs
                                ----------------------------------------------------
                                Died c. 870. Hedda was the abbot of Peterborough (Medehampstead). He
                                and 84 monks of his community were slain by the Danes, who that same
                                year killed Saint Edmund of East Anglia (f.d. November 20). Hedda and
                                his monks are venerated as martyrs. In the later Middle Ages the "Hedda
                                stone" stood in the cemetery over the grave of the martyrs. Holes were
                                cut into the slab to hold candles for using it as an altar at which to
                                say Mass--a custom started by abbot Godric. In the 17th century,
                                pilgrims would put their fingers into the holes, perhaps to take dust as
                                a souvenir (Benedictines, Farmer).

                                Sources:
                                ========

                                Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                                (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                                Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                                (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                                Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                                Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                                Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                                Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                                Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                                Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                                London: Virtue & Co.

                                John, C. R. The Saints of Cornwall (1981). Lodenek Press Ltd.

                                For All the Saints: - new active link
                                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

                                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West - new active link
                                http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/saintsa.htm

                                These Lives are archived at:
                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                                ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
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