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7 January

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  • emrys@globe.net.nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 6, 2008
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Brannock of Braunton
      * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
      * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
      --------------------------------------------------------
      6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
      into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
      in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
      traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
      identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
      or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
      and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
      the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

      Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
      Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
      wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
      tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
      precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
      heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
      reward of the blest.

      Icon of St.Brannock:
      http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



      St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
      --------------------------------------------------------
      (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
      Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
      of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
      She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
      her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
      Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
      Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
      where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
      Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


      St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
      ----------------------------------
      7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
      connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).



      Lives kindly supplied by:
      For All the Saints:
      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

      These Lives are archived at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
    • emrys@globe.net.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 6, 2009
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        Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Brannock of Braunton
        * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
        * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
        --------------------------------------------------------
        6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
        into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
        in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
        traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
        identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
        or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
        and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
        the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

        Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
        Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
        wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
        tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
        precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
        heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
        reward of the blest.

        Icon of St.Brannock:
        http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



        St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
        --------------------------------------------------------
        (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
        Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
        of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
        She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
        her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
        Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
        Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
        where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
        Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


        St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
        ----------------------------------
        7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
        connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).



        Lives kindly supplied by:
        For All the Saints:
        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

        An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
      • emrys@globe.net.nz
        Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 6, 2010
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          Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Brannock of Braunton
          * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
          * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


          St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
          --------------------------------------------------------
          6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
          into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
          in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
          traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
          identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
          or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
          and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
          the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

          Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
          Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
          wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
          tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
          precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
          heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
          reward of the blest.

          Icon of St.Brannock:
          http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



          St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
          --------------------------------------------------------
          (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
          Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
          of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
          She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
          her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
          Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
          Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
          where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
          Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


          St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
          ----------------------------------
          7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
          connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).

          A little more detail on St Cronan Beg from O'Hanlon:

          St. Cronan Beg, Bishop of Nendrum, County of Down. Seventh Century

          This prelate obtained his cognomen, probably owing to his being under the
          middle size. Cronan Beg, or " the little," bishop over the ancient Aendrum,
          had a festival on this day, according to the Martyrology of Donegal. The
          Martyrology of Tallagh simply registers Cronan, bishop, at the 7th of
          January. His place is now distinguished as Inis Mahee, in the county of
          Down. It is a portion of Tullynakill parish, and it
          lies about a quarter of a mile from the shore in Strangford Lough. This
          island is situated about thirteen miles N.N.E. from Downpatrick. The name of
          this present bishop will be found in a letter, written
          from Rome, A.D. 640, on the subject of the Pascal Controversy. In his tract
          on some of the Irish bishops, Duald Mac Firbis says, that perhaps this is he
          with whom Caendruim is placed; and his remark
          seems to have reference to a subsequent entry regarding the rest of Cronan,
          Bishop of Caondruim, who died about the year 639. Other, and more reliable,
          authorities place his demise at the 7th of January,
          a.d. 642." As may be seen, this date is only a little over a year later than
          the date of the epistle from Rome, addressed to him in common with other
          Irish bishops. Some very interesting remains of antiquity are yet traceable
          on Mahee Island.

          O'Hanlon's Lives of the Irish Saints, Volume 1, 89-90

          http://www.archive.org/details/livesofirishsain01ohanuoft




          Lives kindly supplied by:
          For All the Saints:
          http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

          An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
          http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
        • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
          Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 6, 2011
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            Celtic and Old English Saints          7 January

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Brannock of Braunton
            * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
            * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


            St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
            --------------------------------------------------------
            6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
            into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
            in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
            traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
            identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
            or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
            and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
            the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

            Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
            Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
            wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
            tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
            precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
            heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
            reward of the blest.

            Icon of St.Brannock:
            http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



            St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
            --------------------------------------------------------
            (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
            Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
            of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
            She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
            her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
            Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
            Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
            where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
            Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


            St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
            ----------------------------------
            7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
            connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).

            A little more detail on St Cronan Beg from O'Hanlon:

            St. Cronan Beg, Bishop of Nendrum, County of Down. Seventh Century

            This prelate obtained his cognomen, probably owing to his being under the
            middle size. Cronan Beg, or " the little," bishop over the ancient Aendrum,
            had a festival on this day, according to the Martyrology of Donegal. The
            Martyrology of Tallagh simply registers Cronan, bishop, at the 7th of
            January. His place is now distinguished as Inis Mahee, in the county of
            Down. It is a portion of Tullynakill parish, and it
            lies about a quarter of a mile from the shore in Strangford Lough. This
            island is situated about thirteen miles N.N.E. from Downpatrick. The name of
            this present bishop will be found in a letter, written
            from Rome, A.D. 640, on the subject of the Pascal Controversy. In his tract
            on some of the Irish bishops, Duald Mac Firbis says, that perhaps this is he
            with whom Caendruim is placed; and his remark
            seems to have reference to a subsequent entry regarding the rest of Cronan,
            Bishop of Caondruim, who died about the year 639. Other, and more reliable,
            authorities place his demise at the 7th of January,
            a.d. 642." As may be seen, this date is only a little over a year later than
            the date of the epistle from Rome, addressed to him in common with other
            Irish bishops. Some very interesting remains of antiquity are yet traceable
            on Mahee Island.

            O'Hanlon's Lives of the Irish Saints, Volume 1, 89-90

            http://www.archive.org/details/livesofirishsain01ohanuoft




            Lives kindly supplied by:
            For All the Saints:
            http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

            An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
            http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤


          • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 7 February =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Ronan of Kilmaronen * St. Richard of Wessex * St.
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 6, 2011
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              Celtic and Old English Saints 7 February

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Ronan of Kilmaronen
              * St. Richard of Wessex
              * St. Meldon of Peronne
              * St. Tressan of Mareuil
              * St Aule of London
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


              St. Ronan of Kilmaronen, Bishop
              (Ruadan, Ruadhan)
              -----------------------------------------------------------
              Saint Ronan, a Scottish bishop of Kilmaronen, has erroneously been
              identified as the Irish monk mentioned by the Venerable Bede (f.d. May
              25) as the defender of the Roman calculation for the date of Easter at
              the Synod of Whitby. St. Ronan's Well at Innerleithen, Peeblesshire, was
              popularised by one of Sir Walter Scott's novels. According to tradition,
              Ronan came into the valley and drove out the devil. This event is
              remembered annually at the end of "Saint Ronan's Games" in July when a
              schoolboy, given a pastoral staff, is chosen to represent the saint as
              he "cleeks the devil" (Farmer).



              St. Richard the King, Confessor
              -------------------------------------
              Died 722. More than any other race, the Anglo Saxons are distinguished
              for the royal patronage bestowed upon the Christian Church, and for the
              way in which kings and their families have worked in the spreading of
              the gospel in their own lands and overseas. St.Richard and his family
              are outstanding examples. He was one of the kings or princes of Wessex,
              related to the royal house of Kent, and married to Winna, herself a
              descendant of Cerdic and aunt to Boniface of Crediton.

              Richard was brought up as a Christian and his faith was real and firm.
              When his eldest son Willibald was three years old, the child fell
              grievously ill, and there seemed to be no hope for his recovery. His
              father wrapped him in a blanket and, mounting his horse, rode out into
              the night to a wayside crucifix at a crossroads near to the village
              where they lived. Butler tells us that

              "Saint Richard, when living, obtained by his prayers the recovery of
              his younger son Willibald, whom he laid at the foot of a great crucifix
              erected in a public place in England, when the child's life was
              despaired of in a grievous sickness."

              Richard placed the child at the foot of the cross and knelt in prayer,
              pleading for his son's life. Willibald did recover, and two years later
              he was entrusted to Egbald, the abbot of Warham, near Winchester, to be
              trained.

              When Willibald reached manhood, he returned to his family with a desire
              to spread the faith abroad, and persuaded his father and brother to
              accompany him on a pilgrimage to Rome and the Holy Land. Richard had a
              daughter, Walburga, by a second marriage, and she now entered the
              convent at Wimborne, under the Abbess Tetta. When Richard had renounced
              his royal estate, he set sail with his two sons from Hamblehaven near
              Southampton. They made a leisurely progress through France, spending
              time at various Christian centres including Rouen, and it seems that at
              some time during their journey Richard took monastic vows.

              They reached Italy and came to Lucca, where the Cathedral had been built
              by an Irish monk called Frigidian, but known by the local inhabitants as
              Frediano. Richard, who was growing old and had become infirm during his
              travels, now succumbed to the heat and died. His sons saw to his burial
              in St. Frediano's church and then continued their journey. Later they
              joined their uncle St.Boniface and their sister St.Walburga in the work
              of converting the Germans. Their father, St.Richard, is still venerated
              in Lucca. A famous account of the pilgrimage on which he died was
              written by his son's cousin, the nun Hugeburc, entitled "Hodoeporicon"
              (Baring-Gould).

              In art, King Saint Richard is portrayed as a royal pilgrim (ermine-lined
              cloak) with two sons--one a bishop and one an abbot. His crown may be on
              a book (Roeder). He is venerated at Heidenheim and Lucca (Roeder).



              St. Meldon (Medon) of Peronne, Bishop
              --------------------------------------------------------------
              6th century. An Irishman who died at Peronne, France, where he was a
              hermit and where he is the titular saint of several churches
              (Benedictines).


              St. Tressan (Tresain) of Mareuil
              --------------------------------------------------------------
              Died 550. Saint Tressan is said to be one of five or six brothers,
              including Saint Gibrian (f.d. May 8), and three sisters, who travelled
              from Ireland to France to evangelize for the glory of God in the diocese
              of Rheims, France. The names of the others are given as Helan, Germanus,
              Abran (who may be Gibrian), Petran, Franca, Promptia, and Possenna
              (variations on these names are used). Tressan worked there as a
              swineherd, but he was ordained to the priesthood by Saint Remigius (f.d.
              October 1), who provided the siblings with suitable retreats from which
              they could spread the faith. Tressan became curate of
              Mareuil-sur-Marne, and the patron saint of Avenay in Champagne. His
              cultus is strong and has been continuous in the area of Rheims.
              (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Encyclopaedia, Fitzpatrick, Kenney, Montague,
              O'Hanlon).


              St Aule (Augulus), Bishop and Martyr of London
              -----------------------------------------------------------------
              Died c. 303. Saint Jerome's martyrology lists Augulus as a bishop.
              Others describe him as a martyr put to death in London under Diocletian.
              French writers normally identify him with Saint Aule of Normandy
              (Benedictines).

              Troparion of St Aule tone 3
              Having lighted the candle of faith in London,/ O glorious Martyr Aule,/
              thy radiance was a challenge to the godless Diocletian/ who caused the
              flame of thy life to be extinguished./ Pray, O martyr, that the flame of
              our faith/ may burn so brightly that through our constancy/ we may be
              found worthy of the mercy of Christ our God.

              Kontakion of St Aule tone 7
              Thou didst sanctify our capital with thy blood,/ O Passion-Bearer Aule,/
              defending the true Faith,/ which was more precious to thee than life
              itself./ We honour thee, we hymn thee/ and we praise thy name rejoicing/
              in thy glorious memory.


              Sources:
              ========

              Baring-Gould, S. The Lives of the Saints
              (15 volumes: John Hodges, 1882)

              Benedictine Monks of St. Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
              (1947). The Book of Saints. NY: Macmillan.

              Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
              Saints of the British Isles Complied from
              Ancient Calendars.

              D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
              Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
              useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
              provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
              lives of the saints.]

              Delaney, J. J. (1983). Pocket Dictionary of Saints.
              New York: Doubleday Image.

              Fitzpatrick, B. (1922). Ireland and the Making of Britain.
              New York: Funk and Wagnalls.

              Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
              New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

              Kenney, J. F. (1929). Sources for Early History of Ireland,
              Ecclesiastical. New York: Columbia University Press.

              Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
              Guildford: Billing & Sons.

              O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

              Roeder, Helen. (1955). Saints and Their Attributes: With a
              Guide to Localities and Patronage. Chicago:
              Henry Regnery Company.

              For All the Saints:
              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

              An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
              http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints

              ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
            • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
              Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
              Message 6 of 15 , Jan 6, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January

                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                * St. Brannock of Braunton
                * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
                * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
                --------------------------------------------------------
                6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
                into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
                in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
                traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
                identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
                or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
                and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
                the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

                Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
                Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
                wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
                tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
                precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
                heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
                reward of the blest.

                Icon of St.Brannock:
                http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



                St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
                --------------------------------------------------------
                (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
                Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
                of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
                She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
                her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
                Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
                Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
                where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
                Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


                St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
                ----------------------------------
                7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
                connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).

                A little more detail on St Cronan Beg from O'Hanlon:

                St. Cronan Beg, Bishop of Nendrum, County of Down. Seventh Century

                This prelate obtained his cognomen, probably owing to his being under the
                middle size. Cronan Beg, or " the little," bishop over the ancient Aendrum,
                had a festival on this day, according to the Martyrology of Donegal. The
                Martyrology of Tallagh simply registers Cronan, bishop, at the 7th of
                January. His place is now distinguished as Inis Mahee, in the county of
                Down. It is a portion of Tullynakill parish, and it
                lies about a quarter of a mile from the shore in Strangford Lough. This
                island is situated about thirteen miles N.N.E. from Downpatrick. The name of
                this present bishop will be found in a letter, written
                from Rome, A.D. 640, on the subject of the Pascal Controversy. In his tract
                on some of the Irish bishops, Duald Mac Firbis says, that perhaps this is he
                with whom Caendruim is placed; and his remark
                seems to have reference to a subsequent entry regarding the rest of Cronan,
                Bishop of Caondruim, who died about the year 639. Other, and more reliable,
                authorities place his demise at the 7th of January,
                a.d. 642." As may be seen, this date is only a little over a year later than
                the date of the epistle from Rome, addressed to him in common with other
                Irish bishops. Some very interesting remains of antiquity are yet traceable
                on Mahee Island.

                O'Hanlon's Lives of the Irish Saints, Volume 1, 89-90

                http://www.archive.org/details/livesofirishsain01ohanuoft




                Lives kindly supplied by:
                For All the Saints:
                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                These Lives are archived at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
              • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
                Message 7 of 15 , Jan 7, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January

                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  * St. Brannock of Braunton
                  * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
                  * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                  St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
                  --------------------------------------------------------
                  6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
                  into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
                  in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
                  traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
                  identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
                  or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
                  and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
                  the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

                  Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
                  Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
                  wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
                  tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
                  precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
                  heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
                  reward of the blest.

                  Icon of St.Brannock:
                  http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



                  St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
                  --------------------------------------------------------
                  (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
                  Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
                  of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
                  She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
                  her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
                  Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
                  Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
                  where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
                  Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


                  St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
                  ----------------------------------
                  7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
                  connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).

                  A little more detail on St Cronan Beg from O'Hanlon:

                  St. Cronan Beg, Bishop of Nendrum, County of Down. Seventh Century

                  This prelate obtained his cognomen, probably owing to his being under the
                  middle size. Cronan Beg, or " the little," bishop over the ancient Aendrum,
                  had a festival on this day, according to the Martyrology of Donegal. The
                  Martyrology of Tallagh simply registers Cronan, bishop, at the 7th of
                  January. His place is now distinguished as Inis Mahee, in the county of
                  Down. It is a portion of Tullynakill parish, and it
                  lies about a quarter of a mile from the shore in Strangford Lough. This
                  island is situated about thirteen miles N.N.E. from Downpatrick. The name of
                  this present bishop will be found in a letter, written
                  from Rome, A.D. 640, on the subject of the Pascal Controversy. In his tract
                  on some of the Irish bishops, Duald Mac Firbis says, that perhaps this is he
                  with whom Caendruim is placed; and his remark
                  seems to have reference to a subsequent entry regarding the rest of Cronan,
                  Bishop of Caondruim, who died about the year 639. Other, and more reliable,
                  authorities place his demise at the 7th of January,
                  a.d. 642." As may be seen, this date is only a little over a year later than
                  the date of the epistle from Rome, addressed to him in common with other
                  Irish bishops. Some very interesting remains of antiquity are yet traceable
                  on Mahee Island.

                  O'Hanlon's Lives of the Irish Saints, Volume 1, 89-90

                  http://www.archive.org/details/livesofirishsain01ohanuoft




                  Lives kindly supplied by:
                  For All the Saints:
                  http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                  An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                  http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                  These Lives are archived at:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                  ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Brannock of Braunton * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond *
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jan 7, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 7 January

                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    * St. Brannock of Braunton
                    * St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond
                    * St. Cronan Beg of County Down
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                    St. Brannock (Barnoc, Brannoc), Abbot
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    6th century. Saint Brannock appears to have migrated from southern Wales
                    into Devon, and to have founded a monastery at Braunton, near Barnstaple
                    in Devonshire, where William Worcestre and Leland say he was buried. The
                    traditions concerning him are sometimes uncertain. Some hagiographers
                    identify him as the 6th-century Welsh missionary Saint Brynach (Bernach
                    or Bernacus). Because there are two separate feasts at Exeter on April
                    and January 7 for the respective saints, it is unlikely that they are
                    the same person (Benedictines, Farmer).

                    Troparion of St Brannock of Braunton tone 1
                    Righteous tutor of the children of Brychan, The Great Wonderworker. O
                    wise Father Brannock,/ thou didst win many souls for Christ by thy
                    tireless endeavours./ In Devon's Braunton Church are your concealed
                    precious relics./ Pray that we, being ever mindful of our Orthodox
                    heritage,/ may never deviate from the true faith,/ thereby, receive the,
                    reward of the blest.

                    Icon of St.Brannock:
                    http://saints.oca.org/IconDirectory/LG/january/0107brannockbraunton.jpg



                    St. Kentigerna of Loch Lomond, Widow
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    (also known as Caentigern, Quentigerna)
                    Died on Inch Cailleach, Scotland, c. 733-734. Kentigerna was the mother
                    of Saint Fillan and the daughter of Kelly (Cellach), prince of Leinster.
                    She married a neighbouring prince, who was the father of Fillan. After
                    her husband's death, she left Ireland with her missionary brother Saint
                    Comghan and her son to lead the life of a recluse on the island of Inch
                    Cailleach (or Inchebroida, according to some), in Loch Lomond, Scotland,
                    where a church is dedicated in her name. Kentigerna is listed in the
                    Aberdeen Breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Montague).


                    St. Cronan Beg, Bishop
                    ----------------------------------
                    7th century. A bishop of ancient Aendrum, County Down, mentioned in
                    connection with the paschal controversy in 640 (Benedictines).

                    A little more detail on St Cronan Beg from O'Hanlon:

                    St. Cronan Beg, Bishop of Nendrum, County of Down. Seventh Century

                    This prelate obtained his cognomen, probably owing to his being under the
                    middle size. Cronan Beg, or " the little," bishop over the ancient Aendrum,
                    had a festival on this day, according to the Martyrology of Donegal. The
                    Martyrology of Tallagh simply registers Cronan, bishop, at the 7th of
                    January. His place is now distinguished as Inis Mahee, in the county of
                    Down. It is a portion of Tullynakill parish, and it
                    lies about a quarter of a mile from the shore in Strangford Lough. This
                    island is situated about thirteen miles N.N.E. from Downpatrick. The name of
                    this present bishop will be found in a letter, written
                    from Rome, A.D. 640, on the subject of the Pascal Controversy. In his tract
                    on some of the Irish bishops, Duald Mac Firbis says, that perhaps this is he
                    with whom Caendruim is placed; and his remark
                    seems to have reference to a subsequent entry regarding the rest of Cronan,
                    Bishop of Caondruim, who died about the year 639. Other, and more reliable,
                    authorities place his demise at the 7th of January,
                    a.d. 642." As may be seen, this date is only a little over a year later than
                    the date of the epistle from Rome, addressed to him in common with other
                    Irish bishops. Some very interesting remains of antiquity are yet traceable
                    on Mahee Island.

                    O'Hanlon's Lives of the Irish Saints, Volume 1, 89-90

                    http://www.archive.org/details/livesofirishsain01ohanuoft



                    These Lives are archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                    ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
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