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30 October

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  • emrys@globe.net.nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 29, 2007
      Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
      * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
      * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
      * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Talaric of Scotland
      ------------------------------------------
      (also known as Talarican)
      6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
      Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
      (Benedictines).


      St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
      -------------------------------------------
      http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


      St. Egelnoth the Good
      -------------------------------------------
      (also known as Ethelnoth)
      Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
      archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
      death (Benedictines).


      Lives kindly supplied by:
      For All the Saints:
      http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
      These Lives are archived at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
      *****************************************
    • emrys@globe.net.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 28, 2008
        Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
        * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
        * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
        * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Talaric of Scotland
        ------------------------------------------
        (also known as Talarican)
        6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
        Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
        (Benedictines).


        St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
        -------------------------------------------
        http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


        St. Egelnoth the Good
        -------------------------------------------
        (also known as Ethelnoth)
        Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
        archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
        death (Benedictines).


        Lives kindly supplied by:
        For All the Saints:
        http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        *****************************************
      • emrys@globe.net.nz
        Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 29, 2009
          Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
          * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
          * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
          * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


          St. Talaric of Scotland
          ------------------------------------------
          (also known as Talarican)
          6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
          Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
          (Benedictines).


          St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
          -------------------------------------------
          http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


          St. Egelnoth the Good
          -------------------------------------------
          (also known as Ethelnoth)
          Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
          archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
          death (Benedictines).


          Lives kindly supplied by:
          For All the Saints:
          http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          *****************************************
        • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
          Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 29, 2010
            Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
            * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
            * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
            * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


            St. Talaric of Scotland
            ------------------------------------------
            (also known as Talarican)
            6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
            Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
            (Benedictines).


            St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
            -------------------------------------------
            http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


            St. Egelnoth the Good
            -------------------------------------------
            (also known as Ethelnoth)
            Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
            archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
            death (Benedictines).


            St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
            ----------------------------

            Leofric - Warlord & Visionary

            IN the year 1000 Warwickshire was well settled and cultivated, the county
            had over 100 more villages than exist today. These small settlements lived
            under a strict social code called feudalism. The ruling class was the
            ealdorman and thanes. There were freeholders, holding their own land and
            other freemen such as tradesmen, craftsmen, merchants and clergy. Below
            that the population consisted of serfs bonded to the lord and his land.
            The king was Aethelred the Unready (Unraed, meaning ill-advised), an
            ineffective but long-reigning king who failed to solve the Danish problem
            and continued paying them to stop them attacking the south of England.
            Aethelred ordered the massacre of the Danes on St Brices Day in 1002. This
            event provoked the invasion of England by King Sweyn and Thorkell the Tall.
            Aethelred fled but later returned.

            Into this world Leofric and Godiva were born. Leofric (Leof-dear, ric=ruler)
            was the third son of Leofwine, ealdorman of the Hwicca. As both his elder
            brothers were killed in battle Leofric succeeded his father, around the year
            in 1024. He describes himself as 'Dux' warlord in 1026. Being a nobleman of
            some note he soon became a close confidante of King Canute and acquired the
            title Earl of Mercia, making him one of the three most powerful men in Saxon
            England. Leofric, worked hard to keep the balance of power in the land,
            defending Edward the Confessor against the plots of the powerful Earl
            Godwin.

            Leofric was the power behind the succession of Harold I in 1035 and
            supported Hardicanute by putting down a revolt against him in
            Worcestershire, practically massacring the whole population of Worcester
            itself. Despite this harder side to Leofric he was noted as a pious, fair
            man, considered by many a saint for at the Chapel of Our Lady at
            Westminster, he with Edward the Confessor saw a vision of Christ reflected
            in a mirror held by the chaplain.

            In 1057 the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that, 'In this same year, on
            October 30, Earl Leofric passed away. He was very wise in all matters, both
            religious and secular, that benefitted this nation.' Leofric was brought
            from his hall in King's Bromley to Coventry to the monastery of St Mary, St
            Osburg and All Saints which he and Godiva had founded and here his body was
            laid to rest with great pomp and ceremony.

            Leofric's wife, Godiva (Godgifu - God's Gift) is one of the most famous
            women in the world, a name that has lasted the millennium. She was the
            sister of Thorold, Sheriff of Lincolnshire, and her parentage is unknown.
            Godiva was widowed around the year 1028 and it is believed she suffered an
            illness which she considered would be fatal, because at the time she was in
            communication with the Abbott of Ely and bequested property to the church,
            to ensure her place in heaven.She survived her illness and married Leofric,
            now Earl of Mercia possibly around 1035, when she was already a wealthy
            landowner. In looks Godiva is generally noted as being beautiful - the
            chronicler Ingulphus of Croyland describes her as the most beauteous of all
            women of her time. Praise indeed. Her close call with death enforced
            Godiva's religious beliefs and devotion to the Virgin Mary, much to the
            benefit of various religious establishments around the country. She and
            Leofric owned Coventry and much of the county and visited Coventry on a
            regular basis. The monastery they founded in Coventry in 1045 benefitted
            from endowments made by both. Godiva had her jewellery melted down and
            recast into religious images for the church founded in the name of her
            favourite deity.

            When Leofric died Godiva appears to have moved to Evesham, and endowed the
            church of the Holy Trinity and the monastery, now gone. Godiva stayed at the
            monastery and witnessed the destruction of her world after William the
            Conqueror destroyed the last Saxon king, Harold, on Senlac Hill in Hastings.
            Here in Evesham on September 10, 1067 Godiva died and as she is estimated to
            have been born on the turn of the millennium, she would have been around 67
            years of age. Godiva was buried in Evesham Abbey and although there is no
            historical evidence tradition has always stated that she was later
            re-interred in Coventry in the choir, opposite Leofric. On her death she
            ordered that her gold-jewelled chain be placed around the neck of the image
            of the Virgin in St Mary's, Coventry. those who came to pray she stated,
            should say a prayer for every stone in the chain.

            Leofric and Godiva had one son - it was claimed in the past that Hereward
            the Wake was also their son but this has long since been dismissed. Their
            only son was Aelfgar (Elf-spear), he became Earl of Mercia on Leofric's
            death in 1057 until his death in 1062. He was considered a womaniser and
            warrior, and was always being out-lawed, being considered a threat to the
            peace of the realm. Not averse to killing monks, he was apparently loved by
            those he governed. On his death he was interred in Coventry.

            http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/videos-pics/coventry-history/city-history/city-history-1250ad/2001/03/27/leofric-warlord-visionary-92746-11005520/


            Lives kindly supplied by:
            For All the Saints:
            http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            *****************************************
          • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 28, 2011
              Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
              * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
              * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
              * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


              St. Talaric of Scotland
              ------------------------------------------
              (also known as Talarican)
              6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
              Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
              (Benedictines).


              St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
              -------------------------------------------
              http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


              St. Egelnoth the Good
              -------------------------------------------
              (also known as Ethelnoth)
              Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
              archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
              death (Benedictines).


              St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
              ----------------------------

              Leofric - Warlord & Visionary

              IN the year 1000 Warwickshire was well settled and cultivated, the county
              had over 100 more villages than exist today. These small settlements lived
              under a strict social code called feudalism. The ruling class was the
              ealdorman and thanes. There were freeholders, holding their own land and
              other freemen such as tradesmen, craftsmen, merchants and clergy. Below
              that the population consisted of serfs bonded to the lord and his land.
              The king was Aethelred the Unready (Unraed, meaning ill-advised), an
              ineffective but long-reigning king who failed to solve the Danish problem
              and continued paying them to stop them attacking the south of England.
              Aethelred ordered the massacre of the Danes on St Brices Day in 1002. This
              event provoked the invasion of England by King Sweyn and Thorkell the Tall.
              Aethelred fled but later returned.

              Into this world Leofric and Godiva were born. Leofric (Leof-dear, ric=ruler)
              was the third son of Leofwine, ealdorman of the Hwicca. As both his elder
              brothers were killed in battle Leofric succeeded his father, around the year
              in 1024. He describes himself as 'Dux' warlord in 1026. Being a nobleman of
              some note he soon became a close confidante of King Canute and acquired the
              title Earl of Mercia, making him one of the three most powerful men in Saxon
              England. Leofric, worked hard to keep the balance of power in the land,
              defending Edward the Confessor against the plots of the powerful Earl
              Godwin.

              Leofric was the power behind the succession of Harold I in 1035 and
              supported Hardicanute by putting down a revolt against him in
              Worcestershire, practically massacring the whole population of Worcester
              itself. Despite this harder side to Leofric he was noted as a pious, fair
              man, considered by many a saint for at the Chapel of Our Lady at
              Westminster, he with Edward the Confessor saw a vision of Christ reflected
              in a mirror held by the chaplain.

              In 1057 the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that, 'In this same year, on
              October 30, Earl Leofric passed away. He was very wise in all matters, both
              religious and secular, that benefitted this nation.' Leofric was brought
              from his hall in King's Bromley to Coventry to the monastery of St Mary, St
              Osburg and All Saints which he and Godiva had founded and here his body was
              laid to rest with great pomp and ceremony.

              Leofric's wife, Godiva (Godgifu - God's Gift) is one of the most famous
              women in the world, a name that has lasted the millennium. She was the
              sister of Thorold, Sheriff of Lincolnshire, and her parentage is unknown.
              Godiva was widowed around the year 1028 and it is believed she suffered an
              illness which she considered would be fatal, because at the time she was in
              communication with the Abbott of Ely and bequested property to the church,
              to ensure her place in heaven.She survived her illness and married Leofric,
              now Earl of Mercia possibly around 1035, when she was already a wealthy
              landowner. In looks Godiva is generally noted as being beautiful - the
              chronicler Ingulphus of Croyland describes her as the most beauteous of all
              women of her time. Praise indeed. Her close call with death enforced
              Godiva's religious beliefs and devotion to the Virgin Mary, much to the
              benefit of various religious establishments around the country. She and
              Leofric owned Coventry and much of the county and visited Coventry on a
              regular basis. The monastery they founded in Coventry in 1045 benefitted
              from endowments made by both. Godiva had her jewellery melted down and
              recast into religious images for the church founded in the name of her
              favourite deity.

              When Leofric died Godiva appears to have moved to Evesham, and endowed the
              church of the Holy Trinity and the monastery, now gone. Godiva stayed at the
              monastery and witnessed the destruction of her world after William the
              Conqueror destroyed the last Saxon king, Harold, on Senlac Hill in Hastings.
              Here in Evesham on September 10, 1067 Godiva died and as she is estimated to
              have been born on the turn of the millennium, she would have been around 67
              years of age. Godiva was buried in Evesham Abbey and although there is no
              historical evidence tradition has always stated that she was later
              re-interred in Coventry in the choir, opposite Leofric. On her death she
              ordered that her gold-jewelled chain be placed around the neck of the image
              of the Virgin in St Mary's, Coventry. those who came to pray she stated,
              should say a prayer for every stone in the chain.

              Leofric and Godiva had one son - it was claimed in the past that Hereward
              the Wake was also their son but this has long since been dismissed. Their
              only son was Aelfgar (Elf-spear), he became Earl of Mercia on Leofric's
              death in 1057 until his death in 1062. He was considered a womaniser and
              warrior, and was always being out-lawed, being considered a threat to the
              peace of the realm. Not averse to killing monks, he was apparently loved by
              those he governed. On his death he was interred in Coventry.

              http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/videos-pics/coventry-history/city-history/city-history-1250ad/2001/03/27/leofric-warlord-visionary-92746-11005520/


              Lives kindly supplied by:
              For All the Saints:
              http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
              *****************************************
            • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
              Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 29, 2012
                Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
                * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
                * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
                * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                St. Talaric of Scotland
                ------------------------------------------
                (also known as Talarican)
                6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
                Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
                (Benedictines).


                St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
                -------------------------------------------
                http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


                St. Egelnoth the Good
                -------------------------------------------
                (also known as Ethelnoth)
                Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
                archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
                death (Benedictines).


                St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
                ----------------------------

                Leofric - Warlord & Visionary

                IN the year 1000 Warwickshire was well settled and cultivated, the county
                had over 100 more villages than exist today. These small settlements lived
                under a strict social code called feudalism. The ruling class was the
                ealdorman and thanes. There were freeholders, holding their own land and
                other freemen such as tradesmen, craftsmen, merchants and clergy. Below
                that the population consisted of serfs bonded to the lord and his land.
                The king was Aethelred the Unready (Unraed, meaning ill-advised), an
                ineffective but long-reigning king who failed to solve the Danish problem
                and continued paying them to stop them attacking the south of England.
                Aethelred ordered the massacre of the Danes on St Brices Day in 1002. This
                event provoked the invasion of England by King Sweyn and Thorkell the Tall.
                Aethelred fled but later returned.

                Into this world Leofric and Godiva were born. Leofric (Leof-dear, ric=ruler)
                was the third son of Leofwine, ealdorman of the Hwicca. As both his elder
                brothers were killed in battle Leofric succeeded his father, around the year
                in 1024. He describes himself as 'Dux' warlord in 1026. Being a nobleman of
                some note he soon became a close confidante of King Canute and acquired the
                title Earl of Mercia, making him one of the three most powerful men in Saxon
                England. Leofric, worked hard to keep the balance of power in the land,
                defending Edward the Confessor against the plots of the powerful Earl
                Godwin.

                Leofric was the power behind the succession of Harold I in 1035 and
                supported Hardicanute by putting down a revolt against him in
                Worcestershire, practically massacring the whole population of Worcester
                itself. Despite this harder side to Leofric he was noted as a pious, fair
                man, considered by many a saint for at the Chapel of Our Lady at
                Westminster, he with Edward the Confessor saw a vision of Christ reflected
                in a mirror held by the chaplain.

                In 1057 the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that, 'In this same year, on
                October 30, Earl Leofric passed away. He was very wise in all matters, both
                religious and secular, that benefitted this nation.' Leofric was brought
                from his hall in King's Bromley to Coventry to the monastery of St Mary, St
                Osburg and All Saints which he and Godiva had founded and here his body was
                laid to rest with great pomp and ceremony.

                Leofric's wife, Godiva (Godgifu - God's Gift) is one of the most famous
                women in the world, a name that has lasted the millennium. She was the
                sister of Thorold, Sheriff of Lincolnshire, and her parentage is unknown.
                Godiva was widowed around the year 1028 and it is believed she suffered an
                illness which she considered would be fatal, because at the time she was in
                communication with the Abbott of Ely and bequested property to the church,
                to ensure her place in heaven.She survived her illness and married Leofric,
                now Earl of Mercia possibly around 1035, when she was already a wealthy
                landowner. In looks Godiva is generally noted as being beautiful - the
                chronicler Ingulphus of Croyland describes her as the most beauteous of all
                women of her time. Praise indeed. Her close call with death enforced
                Godiva's religious beliefs and devotion to the Virgin Mary, much to the
                benefit of various religious establishments around the country. She and
                Leofric owned Coventry and much of the county and visited Coventry on a
                regular basis. The monastery they founded in Coventry in 1045 benefitted
                from endowments made by both. Godiva had her jewellery melted down and
                recast into religious images for the church founded in the name of her
                favourite deity.

                When Leofric died Godiva appears to have moved to Evesham, and endowed the
                church of the Holy Trinity and the monastery, now gone. Godiva stayed at the
                monastery and witnessed the destruction of her world after William the
                Conqueror destroyed the last Saxon king, Harold, on Senlac Hill in Hastings.
                Here in Evesham on September 10, 1067 Godiva died and as she is estimated to
                have been born on the turn of the millennium, she would have been around 67
                years of age. Godiva was buried in Evesham Abbey and although there is no
                historical evidence tradition has always stated that she was later
                re-interred in Coventry in the choir, opposite Leofric. On her death she
                ordered that her gold-jewelled chain be placed around the neck of the image
                of the Virgin in St Mary's, Coventry. those who came to pray she stated,
                should say a prayer for every stone in the chain.

                Leofric and Godiva had one son - it was claimed in the past that Hereward
                the Wake was also their son but this has long since been dismissed. Their
                only son was Aelfgar (Elf-spear), he became Earl of Mercia on Leofric's
                death in 1057 until his death in 1062. He was considered a womaniser and
                warrior, and was always being out-lawed, being considered a threat to the
                peace of the realm. Not averse to killing monks, he was apparently loved by
                those he governed. On his death he was interred in Coventry.

                http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/videos-pics/coventry-history/city-history/city-history-1250ad/2001/03/27/leofric-warlord-visionary-92746-11005520/


                Lives kindly supplied by:
                For All the Saints:
                http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
                These Lives are archived at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                *****************************************
              • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland * St. Illogan of Cornwall,
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 29, 2013
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 30 October

                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  * St. Talaric, Bishop in Scotland
                  * St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
                  * St. Egelnoth the Good, Archbishop of Canterbury
                  * St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                  St. Talaric of Scotland
                  ------------------------------------------
                  (also known as Talarican)
                  6th century. A bishop, probably Pictish, in whose honour various
                  Scottish churches were dedicated. Mentioned in the Aberdeen Breviary
                  (Benedictines).


                  St. Illogan of Cornwall, Confessor
                  -------------------------------------------
                  http://web.archive.org/web/20030416191344/www.saint-illogan.org.uk/saint.htm


                  St. Egelnoth the Good
                  -------------------------------------------
                  (also known as Ethelnoth)
                  Died 1038. The monk Saint Egelnoth of Glastonbury was consecrated
                  archbishop of Canterbury in 1020 and served in that capacity until his
                  death (Benedictines).


                  St. Leofric, Earl of Mercia
                  ----------------------------

                  Leofric - Warlord & Visionary

                  IN the year 1000 Warwickshire was well settled and cultivated, the county
                  had over 100 more villages than exist today. These small settlements lived
                  under a strict social code called feudalism. The ruling class was the
                  ealdorman and thanes. There were freeholders, holding their own land and
                  other freemen such as tradesmen, craftsmen, merchants and clergy. Below
                  that the population consisted of serfs bonded to the lord and his land.
                  The king was Aethelred the Unready (Unraed, meaning ill-advised), an
                  ineffective but long-reigning king who failed to solve the Danish problem
                  and continued paying them to stop them attacking the south of England.
                  Aethelred ordered the massacre of the Danes on St Brices Day in 1002. This
                  event provoked the invasion of England by King Sweyn and Thorkell the Tall.
                  Aethelred fled but later returned.

                  Into this world Leofric and Godiva were born. Leofric (Leof-dear, ric=ruler)
                  was the third son of Leofwine, ealdorman of the Hwicca. As both his elder
                  brothers were killed in battle Leofric succeeded his father, around the year
                  in 1024. He describes himself as 'Dux' warlord in 1026. Being a nobleman of
                  some note he soon became a close confidante of King Canute and acquired the
                  title Earl of Mercia, making him one of the three most powerful men in Saxon
                  England. Leofric, worked hard to keep the balance of power in the land,
                  defending Edward the Confessor against the plots of the powerful Earl
                  Godwin.

                  Leofric was the power behind the succession of Harold I in 1035 and
                  supported Hardicanute by putting down a revolt against him in
                  Worcestershire, practically massacring the whole population of Worcester
                  itself. Despite this harder side to Leofric he was noted as a pious, fair
                  man, considered by many a saint for at the Chapel of Our Lady at
                  Westminster, he with Edward the Confessor saw a vision of Christ reflected
                  in a mirror held by the chaplain.

                  In 1057 the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that, 'In this same year, on
                  October 30, Earl Leofric passed away. He was very wise in all matters, both
                  religious and secular, that benefitted this nation.' Leofric was brought
                  from his hall in King's Bromley to Coventry to the monastery of St Mary, St
                  Osburg and All Saints which he and Godiva had founded and here his body was
                  laid to rest with great pomp and ceremony.

                  Leofric's wife, Godiva (Godgifu - God's Gift) is one of the most famous
                  women in the world, a name that has lasted the millennium. She was the
                  sister of Thorold, Sheriff of Lincolnshire, and her parentage is unknown.
                  Godiva was widowed around the year 1028 and it is believed she suffered an
                  illness which she considered would be fatal, because at the time she was in
                  communication with the Abbott of Ely and bequested property to the church,
                  to ensure her place in heaven.She survived her illness and married Leofric,
                  now Earl of Mercia possibly around 1035, when she was already a wealthy
                  landowner. In looks Godiva is generally noted as being beautiful - the
                  chronicler Ingulphus of Croyland describes her as the most beauteous of all
                  women of her time. Praise indeed. Her close call with death enforced
                  Godiva's religious beliefs and devotion to the Virgin Mary, much to the
                  benefit of various religious establishments around the country. She and
                  Leofric owned Coventry and much of the county and visited Coventry on a
                  regular basis. The monastery they founded in Coventry in 1045 benefitted
                  from endowments made by both. Godiva had her jewellery melted down and
                  recast into religious images for the church founded in the name of her
                  favourite deity.

                  When Leofric died Godiva appears to have moved to Evesham, and endowed the
                  church of the Holy Trinity and the monastery, now gone. Godiva stayed at the
                  monastery and witnessed the destruction of her world after William the
                  Conqueror destroyed the last Saxon king, Harold, on Senlac Hill in Hastings.
                  Here in Evesham on September 10, 1067 Godiva died and as she is estimated to
                  have been born on the turn of the millennium, she would have been around 67
                  years of age. Godiva was buried in Evesham Abbey and although there is no
                  historical evidence tradition has always stated that she was later
                  re-interred in Coventry in the choir, opposite Leofric. On her death she
                  ordered that her gold-jewelled chain be placed around the neck of the image
                  of the Virgin in St Mary's, Coventry. those who came to pray she stated,
                  should say a prayer for every stone in the chain.

                  Leofric and Godiva had one son - it was claimed in the past that Hereward
                  the Wake was also their son but this has long since been dismissed. Their
                  only son was Aelfgar (Elf-spear), he became Earl of Mercia on Leofric's
                  death in 1057 until his death in 1062. He was considered a womaniser and
                  warrior, and was always being out-lawed, being considered a threat to the
                  peace of the realm. Not averse to killing monks, he was apparently loved by
                  those he governed. On his death he was interred in Coventry.

                  http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/videos-pics/coventry-history/city-history/city-history-1250ad/2001/03/27/leofric-warlord-visionary-92746-11005520/

                  These Lives are archived at:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
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