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[celt-saints] 1 April

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  • emrys`nz
    Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor * St. Cellach of Armagh *
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 30, 2000
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Tewdric
      * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
      * St. Cellach of Armagh
      * St. Valery of Leucone
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


      St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
      --------------------------------------------------
      5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
      Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
      written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
      resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
      hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
      at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
      wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
      formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
      He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
      Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
      found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
      at Mathern (Farmer).


      St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
      --------------------------------------------------
      7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
      April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
      country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
      Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
      Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
      to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
      fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
      was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
      Columbanus (f.d. November 23), another Irishman. Their relics are still
      venerated at the parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of
      Amiens, although they rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints
      Caidoc and Fricor joined Riquier's community and remained there until
      they were buried in Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy,
      Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy, Montague, O'Hanlon).


      St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
      --------------------------------------------------
      9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
      Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
      consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


      St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
      (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
      --------------------------------------------------
      Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
      12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

      Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
      fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
      November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
      (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

      Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
      sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
      develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
      knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
      memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
      took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
      Autumo.

      His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
      perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
      cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
      migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
      received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
      was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
      monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
      years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
      monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
      superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
      men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
      himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
      vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
      crops was considered miraculous.

      When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
      monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
      Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
      Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
      Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
      permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
      cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
      converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
      foundation of a monastery.

      His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
      Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
      was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
      labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
      often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
      in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

      When Valery died, cures were claimed at his tomb and a cultus developed,
      which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
      the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
      invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
      from Saint-Valery

      Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
      famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
      in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
      the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
      however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
      Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
      dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
      Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


      Sources:
      ========

      Attwater, D. (1958). A dictionary of saints. New York:
      P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

      Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate. (1947). The
      book of saints: A dictionary of servants of God canonized
      by the Catholic Church extracted from the Roman and other
      martyrologies. NY: Macmillan.

      D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The saints of Ireland. Saint Paul,
      Minnesota: Irish American Cultural Institute.

      Encyclopaedia of Catholic saints, March. (1966).
      Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the foundations of Europe.
      New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

      Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
      lives of the fathers, martyrs, and other principal saints.
      London: Virtue & Co.

      McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
      Saint Columban.

      Montague, H. P. (1981). The saints and martyrs of Ireland.
      Guildford: Billing & Sons.

      O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

      For All the Saints:
      http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm
      These Lives are archived at:
      http://www.egroups.com/group/celt-saints/
      *****************************************
    • ambrós
      Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 31, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Cellach of Armagh
        * St. Tewdric
        * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
        * St. Valery of Leucone
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


        St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
        --------------------------------------------------
        9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
        Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
        consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


        St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
        --------------------------------------------------
        5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
        Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
        written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
        resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
        hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
        at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
        wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
        formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
        He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
        Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
        found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
        at Mathern (Farmer).


        St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
        --------------------------------------------------
        7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
        April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
        country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
        Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
        Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
        to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
        fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
        was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
        Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
        parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
        rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
        joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
        Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
        Montague, O'Hanlon).


        St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
        (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
        --------------------------------------------------
        Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
        12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

        Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
        fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
        November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
        (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

        Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
        sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
        develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
        knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
        memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
        took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
        Autumo.

        His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
        perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
        cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
        migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
        received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
        was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
        monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
        years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
        monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
        superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
        men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
        himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
        vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
        crops was considered miraculous.

        When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
        monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
        Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
        Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
        Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
        permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
        cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
        converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
        foundation of a monastery.

        His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
        Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
        was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
        labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
        often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
        in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

        When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
        which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
        the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
        invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
        from Saint-Valery

        Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
        famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
        in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
        the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
        however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
        Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
        dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
        Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


        Sources:
        ========

        Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
        P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

        Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
        (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

        D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
        Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
        useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
        provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
        lives of the saints.]

        Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
        Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

        Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
        New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
        Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
        London: Virtue & Co.

        McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
        Saint Columban.

        Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
        Guildford: Billing & Sons.

        O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

        For All the Saints:
        http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

        Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page
        http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/celtic.htm

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        *****************************************
      • ambrós
        Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 30, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Cellach of Armagh
          * St. Tewdric
          * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
          * St. Valery of Leucone
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


          St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
          --------------------------------------------------
          9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
          Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
          consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


          St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
          --------------------------------------------------
          5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
          Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
          written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
          resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
          hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
          at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
          wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
          formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
          He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
          Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
          found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
          at Mathern (Farmer).


          St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
          --------------------------------------------------
          7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
          April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
          country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
          Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
          Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
          to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
          fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
          was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
          Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
          parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
          rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
          joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
          Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
          Montague, O'Hanlon).


          St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
          (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
          --------------------------------------------------
          Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
          12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

          Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
          fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
          November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
          (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

          Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
          sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
          develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
          knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
          memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
          took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
          Autumo.

          His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
          perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
          cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
          migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
          received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
          was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
          monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
          years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
          monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
          superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
          men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
          himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
          vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
          crops was considered miraculous.

          When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
          monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
          Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
          Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
          Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
          permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
          cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
          converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
          foundation of a monastery.

          His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
          Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
          was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
          labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
          often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
          in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

          When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
          which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
          the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
          invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
          from Saint-Valery

          Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
          famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
          in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
          the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
          however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
          Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
          dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
          Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


          Sources:
          ========

          Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
          P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

          Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
          (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

          D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
          Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
          useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
          provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
          lives of the saints.]

          Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
          Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

          Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
          Oxford: Oxford University Press.

          Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
          New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

          Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
          Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
          London: Virtue & Co.

          McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
          Saint Columban.

          Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
          Guildford: Billing & Sons.

          O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

          For All the Saints:
          http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

          Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
          http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          *****************************************
        • ambrós
          Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 30, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Cellach of Armagh
            * St. Tewdric
            * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
            * St. Valery of Leucone
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


            St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
            --------------------------------------------------
            9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
            Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
            consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


            St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
            --------------------------------------------------
            5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
            Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
            written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
            resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
            hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
            at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
            wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
            formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
            He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
            Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
            found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
            at Mathern (Farmer).


            St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
            --------------------------------------------------
            7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
            April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
            country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
            Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
            Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
            to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
            fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
            was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
            Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
            parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
            rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
            joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
            Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
            Montague, O'Hanlon).


            St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
            (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
            --------------------------------------------------
            Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
            12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

            Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
            fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
            November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
            (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

            Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
            sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
            develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
            knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
            memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
            took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
            Autumo.

            His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
            perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
            cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
            migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
            received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
            was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
            monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
            years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
            monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
            superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
            men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
            himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
            vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
            crops was considered miraculous.

            When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
            monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
            Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
            Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
            Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
            permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
            cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
            converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
            foundation of a monastery.

            His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
            Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
            was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
            labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
            often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
            in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

            When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
            which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
            the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
            invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
            from Saint-Valery

            Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
            famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
            in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
            the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
            however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
            Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
            dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
            Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


            Sources:
            ========

            Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
            P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

            Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
            (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

            D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
            Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
            useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
            provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
            lives of the saints.]

            Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
            Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

            Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
            Oxford: Oxford University Press.

            Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
            New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

            Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
            Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
            London: Virtue & Co.

            McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
            Saint Columban.

            Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
            Guildford: Billing & Sons.

            O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

            For All the Saints:
            http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

            Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
            http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            *****************************************
          • emrys@globe.net.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 30, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Cellach of Armagh
              * St. Tewdric
              * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
              * St. Valery of Leucone
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


              St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
              --------------------------------------------------
              9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
              Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
              consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


              St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
              --------------------------------------------------
              5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
              Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
              written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
              resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
              hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
              at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
              wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
              formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
              He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
              Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
              found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
              at Mathern (Farmer).


              St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
              --------------------------------------------------
              7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
              April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
              country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
              Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
              Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
              to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
              fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
              was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
              Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
              parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
              rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
              joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
              Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
              Montague, O'Hanlon).


              St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
              (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
              --------------------------------------------------
              Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
              12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

              Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
              fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
              November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
              (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

              Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
              sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
              develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
              knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
              memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
              took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
              Autumo.

              His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
              perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
              cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
              migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
              received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
              was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
              monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
              years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
              monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
              superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
              men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
              himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
              vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
              crops was considered miraculous.

              When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
              monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
              Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
              Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
              Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
              permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
              cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
              converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
              foundation of a monastery.

              His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
              Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
              was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
              labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
              often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
              in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

              When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
              which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
              the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
              invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
              from Saint-Valery

              Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
              famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
              in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
              the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
              however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
              Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
              dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
              Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


              Sources:
              ========

              Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
              P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

              Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
              (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

              D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
              Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
              useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
              provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
              lives of the saints.]

              Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
              Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

              Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
              Oxford: Oxford University Press.

              Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
              New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

              Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
              Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
              London: Virtue & Co.

              McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
              Saint Columban.

              Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
              Guildford: Billing & Sons.

              O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

              For All the Saints:
              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

              Orthodox Ireland Saints
              http://www.orthodoxireland.com/saints/

              An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
              http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
              *****************************************
            • emrys@globe.net.nz
              Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 31, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                * St. Cellach of Armagh
                * St. Tewdric
                * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                * St. Valery of Leucone
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                --------------------------------------------------
                9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                --------------------------------------------------
                5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                at Mathern (Farmer).


                St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                --------------------------------------------------
                7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                Montague, O'Hanlon).


                St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                --------------------------------------------------
                Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                Autumo.

                His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                crops was considered miraculous.

                When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                foundation of a monastery.

                His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                from Saint-Valery

                Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                Sources:
                ========

                Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                lives of the saints.]

                Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                London: Virtue & Co.

                McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                Saint Columban.

                Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                For All the Saints:
                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                These Lives are archived at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                *****************************************
              • emrys@globe.net.nz
                Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 30, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  * St. Cellach of Armagh
                  * St. Tewdric
                  * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                  * St. Valery of Leucone
                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                  St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                  --------------------------------------------------
                  9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                  Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                  consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                  St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                  --------------------------------------------------
                  5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                  Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                  written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                  resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                  hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                  at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                  wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                  formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                  He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                  Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                  found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                  at Mathern (Farmer).


                  St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                  --------------------------------------------------
                  7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                  April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                  country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                  Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                  Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                  to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                  fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                  was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                  Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                  parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                  rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                  joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                  Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                  Montague, O'Hanlon).


                  St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                  (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                  --------------------------------------------------
                  Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                  12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                  Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                  fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                  November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                  (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                  Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                  sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                  develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                  knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                  memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                  took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                  Autumo.

                  His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                  perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                  cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                  migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                  received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                  was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                  monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                  years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                  monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                  superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                  men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                  himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                  vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                  crops was considered miraculous.

                  When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                  monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                  Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                  Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                  Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                  permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                  cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                  converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                  foundation of a monastery.

                  His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                  Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                  was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                  labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                  often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                  in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                  When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                  which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                  the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                  invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                  from Saint-Valery

                  Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                  famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                  in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                  the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                  however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                  Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                  dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                  Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                  Sources:
                  ========

                  Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                  P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                  Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                  (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                  D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                  Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                  useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                  provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                  lives of the saints.]

                  Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                  Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                  Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                  Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                  New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                  Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                  Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                  London: Virtue & Co.

                  McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                  Saint Columban.

                  Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                  Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                  O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                  For All the Saints:
                  http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                  An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                  http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                  These Lives are archived at:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                  ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                • emrys@globe.net.nz
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 1, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    * St. Cellach of Armagh
                    * St. Tewdric
                    * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                    * St. Valery of Leucone
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                    St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                    --------------------------------------------------
                    9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                    Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                    consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                    St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                    --------------------------------------------------
                    5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                    Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                    written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                    resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                    hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                    at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                    wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                    formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                    He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                    Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                    found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                    at Mathern (Farmer).


                    St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                    --------------------------------------------------
                    7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                    April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                    country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                    Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                    Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                    to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                    fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                    was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                    Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                    parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                    rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                    joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                    Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                    Montague, O'Hanlon).


                    St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                    (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                    --------------------------------------------------
                    Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                    12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                    Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                    fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                    November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                    (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                    Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                    sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                    develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                    knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                    memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                    took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                    Autumo.

                    His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                    perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                    cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                    migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                    received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                    was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                    monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                    years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                    monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                    superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                    men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                    himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                    vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                    crops was considered miraculous.

                    When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                    monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                    Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                    Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                    Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                    permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                    cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                    converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                    foundation of a monastery.

                    His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                    Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                    was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                    labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                    often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                    in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                    When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                    which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                    the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                    invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                    from Saint-Valery

                    Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                    famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                    in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                    the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                    however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                    Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                    dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                    Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                    Sources:
                    ========

                    Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                    P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                    Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                    (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                    D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                    Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                    useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                    provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                    lives of the saints.]

                    Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                    Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                    Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                    Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                    Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                    New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                    Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                    Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                    London: Virtue & Co.

                    McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                    Saint Columban.

                    Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                    Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                    O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                    For All the Saints:
                    http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                    An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                    http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                    These Lives are archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                    ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                  • emrys@globe.net.nz
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                    Message 9 of 14 , Mar 31, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                      * St. Cellach of Armagh
                      * St. Tewdric
                      * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                      * St. Valery of Leucone
                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                      St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                      --------------------------------------------------
                      9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                      Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                      consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                      St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                      --------------------------------------------------
                      5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                      Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                      written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                      resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                      hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                      at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                      wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                      formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                      He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                      Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                      found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                      at Mathern (Farmer).


                      St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                      --------------------------------------------------
                      7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                      April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                      country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                      Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                      Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                      to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                      fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                      was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                      Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                      parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                      rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                      joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                      Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                      Montague, O'Hanlon).


                      St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                      (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                      --------------------------------------------------
                      Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                      12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                      Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                      fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                      November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                      (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                      Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                      sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                      develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                      knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                      memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                      took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                      Autumo.

                      His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                      perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                      cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                      migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                      received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                      was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                      monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                      years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                      monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                      superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                      men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                      himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                      vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                      crops was considered miraculous.

                      When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                      monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                      Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                      Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                      Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                      permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                      cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                      converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                      foundation of a monastery.

                      His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                      Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                      was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                      labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                      often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                      in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                      When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                      which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                      the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                      invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                      from Saint-Valery

                      Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                      famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                      in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                      the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                      however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                      Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                      dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                      Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                      Sources:
                      ========

                      Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                      P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                      Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                      (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                      D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                      Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                      useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                      provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                      lives of the saints.]

                      Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                      Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                      Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                      New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                      Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                      Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                      London: Virtue & Co.

                      McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                      Saint Columban.

                      Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                      Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                      O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                      For All the Saints:
                      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                      These Lives are archived at:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                    • emrys@globe.net.nz
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                      Message 10 of 14 , Mar 31, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                        * St. Cellach of Armagh
                        * St. Tewdric
                        * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                        * St. Valery of Leucone
                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                        St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                        --------------------------------------------------
                        9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                        Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                        consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                        St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                        --------------------------------------------------
                        5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                        Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                        written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                        resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                        hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                        at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                        wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                        formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                        He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                        Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                        found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                        at Mathern (Farmer).


                        St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                        --------------------------------------------------
                        7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                        April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                        country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                        Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                        Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                        to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                        fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                        was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                        Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                        parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                        rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                        joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                        Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                        Montague, O'Hanlon).


                        St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                        (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                        --------------------------------------------------
                        Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                        12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                        Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                        fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                        November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                        (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                        Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                        sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                        develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                        knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                        memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                        took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                        Autumo.

                        His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                        perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                        cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                        migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                        received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                        was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                        monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                        years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                        monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                        superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                        men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                        himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                        vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                        crops was considered miraculous.

                        When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                        monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                        Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                        Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                        Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                        permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                        cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                        converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                        foundation of a monastery.

                        His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                        Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                        was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                        labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                        often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                        in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                        When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                        which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                        the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                        invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                        from Saint-Valery

                        Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                        famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                        in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                        the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                        however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                        Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                        dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                        Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                        Sources:
                        ========

                        Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                        P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                        Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                        (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                        D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                        Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                        useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                        provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                        lives of the saints.]

                        Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                        Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                        Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                        New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                        Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                        London: Virtue & Co.

                        McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                        Saint Columban.

                        Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                        Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                        O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                        For All the Saints:
                        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                        An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                        These Lives are archived at:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                      • emrys@globe.net.nz
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                        Message 11 of 14 , Mar 31, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                          * St. Cellach of Armagh
                          * St. Tewdric
                          * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                          * St. Valery of Leucone
                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                          St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                          --------------------------------------------------
                          9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                          Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                          consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                          St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                          --------------------------------------------------
                          5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                          Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                          written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                          resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                          hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                          at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                          wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                          formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                          He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                          Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                          found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                          at Mathern (Farmer).


                          St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                          --------------------------------------------------
                          7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                          April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                          country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                          Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                          Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                          to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                          fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                          was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                          Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                          parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                          rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                          joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                          Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                          Montague, O'Hanlon).


                          St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                          (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                          --------------------------------------------------
                          Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                          12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                          Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                          fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                          November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                          (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                          Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                          sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                          develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                          knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                          memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                          took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                          Autumo.

                          His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                          perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                          cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                          migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                          received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                          was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                          monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                          years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                          monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                          superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                          men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                          himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                          vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                          crops was considered miraculous.

                          When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                          monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                          Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                          Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                          Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                          permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                          cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                          converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                          foundation of a monastery.

                          His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                          Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                          was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                          labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                          often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                          in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                          When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                          which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                          the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                          invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                          from Saint-Valery

                          Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                          famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                          in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                          the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                          however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                          Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                          dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                          Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                          Sources:
                          ========

                          Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                          P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                          Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                          (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                          D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                          Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                          useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                          provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                          lives of the saints.]

                          Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                          Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                          Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                          Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                          Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                          New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                          Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                          Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                          London: Virtue & Co.

                          McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                          Saint Columban.

                          Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                          Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                          O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                          For All the Saints:
                          http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                          An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                          http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                          These Lives are archived at:
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                          ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                        • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                          Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                          Message 12 of 14 , Mar 31, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                            * St. Cellach of Armagh
                            * St. Tewdric
                            * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                            * St. Valery of Leucone
                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                            St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                            --------------------------------------------------
                            9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                            Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                            consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                            St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                            --------------------------------------------------
                            5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                            Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                            written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                            resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                            hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                            at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                            wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                            formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                            He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                            Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                            found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                            at Mathern (Farmer).


                            St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                            --------------------------------------------------
                            7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                            April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                            country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                            Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                            Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                            to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                            fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                            was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                            Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                            parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                            rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                            joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                            Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                            Montague, O'Hanlon).


                            St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                            (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                            --------------------------------------------------
                            Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                            12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                            Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                            fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                            November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                            (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                            Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                            sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                            develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                            knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                            memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                            took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                            Autumo.

                            His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                            perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                            cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                            migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                            received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                            was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                            monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                            years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                            monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                            superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                            men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                            himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                            vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                            crops was considered miraculous.

                            When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                            monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                            Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                            Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                            Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                            permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                            cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                            converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                            foundation of a monastery.

                            His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                            Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                            was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                            labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                            often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                            in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                            When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                            which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                            the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                            invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                            from Saint-Valery

                            Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                            famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                            in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                            the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                            however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                            Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                            dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                            Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                            Sources:
                            ========

                            Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                            P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                            Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                            (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                            D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                            Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                            useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                            provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                            lives of the saints.]

                            Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                            Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                            Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                            Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                            Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                            New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                            Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                            Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                            London: Virtue & Co.

                            McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                            Saint Columban.

                            Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                            Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                            O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                            For All the Saints:
                            http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                            An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                            http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                            These Lives are archived at:
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                            ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                          • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                            Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 1, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                              * St. Cellach of Armagh
                              * St. Tewdric
                              * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                              * St. Valery of Leucone
                              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                              St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                              --------------------------------------------------
                              9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                              Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                              consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                              St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                              --------------------------------------------------
                              5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                              Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                              written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                              resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                              hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                              at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                              wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                              formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                              He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                              Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                              found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                              at Mathern (Farmer).


                              St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                              --------------------------------------------------
                              7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                              April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                              country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                              Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                              Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                              to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                              fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                              was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                              Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                              parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                              rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                              joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                              Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                              Montague, O'Hanlon).


                              St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                              (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                              --------------------------------------------------
                              Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                              12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                              Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                              fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                              November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                              (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                              Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                              sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                              develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                              knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                              memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                              took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                              Autumo.

                              His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                              perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                              cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                              migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                              received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                              was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                              monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                              years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                              monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                              superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                              men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                              himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                              vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                              crops was considered miraculous.

                              When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                              monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                              Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                              Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                              Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                              permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                              cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                              converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                              foundation of a monastery.

                              His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                              Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                              was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                              labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                              often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                              in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                              When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                              which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                              the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                              invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                              from Saint-Valery

                              Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                              famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                              in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                              the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                              however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                              Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                              dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                              Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                              Sources:
                              ========

                              Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                              P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                              Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                              (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                              D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                              Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                              useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                              provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                              lives of the saints.]

                              Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                              Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                              Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                              Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                              Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                              New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                              Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                              Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                              London: Virtue & Co.

                              McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                              Saint Columban.

                              Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                              Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                              O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                              For All the Saints:
                              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                              An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                              http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                              These Lives are archived at:
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                              ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                            • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                              Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Cellach of Armagh * St. Tewdric * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor *
                              Message 14 of 14 , Mar 31, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Celtic and Old English Saints 1 April

                                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                                * St. Cellach of Armagh
                                * St. Tewdric
                                * St. Caidoc and St. Fricor
                                * St. Valery of Leucone
                                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


                                St. Cellach (Ceilach, Keilach, Kelly) of Armagh Bishop
                                --------------------------------------------------
                                9th century. It seems that Saint Cellach may have been the abbot of
                                Iona. He also seems to have founded of the abbey of Kells before his
                                consecration as archbishop of Armagh, Ireland (Benedictines).


                                St. Tewdric (Theodoric), Hermit
                                --------------------------------------------------
                                5th to 6th century; feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint
                                Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the "Book of Llan Dav,"
                                written much later. According to this source, in his later years he
                                resigned his position in favour of his son Meurig in order to become a
                                hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself
                                at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally
                                wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow,
                                formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name.
                                He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr
                                Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff
                                found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church
                                at Mathern (Farmer).


                                St. Caidoc and St. Fricor (Adrian)
                                --------------------------------------------------
                                7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31,
                                April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the
                                country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622.
                                Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint
                                Ricarius; f.d. April 26), who intervened when some locals took offence
                                to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a
                                fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually
                                was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of
                                Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the
                                parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they
                                rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor
                                joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in
                                Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy,
                                Montague, O'Hanlon).


                                St. Valery of Leucone, Abbot
                                (Valerian, Walaricus, Walericus)
                                --------------------------------------------------
                                Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December
                                12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.

                                Valery discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre,
                                fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus (f.d.
                                November 23), and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais
                                (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

                                Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valery tended his father's
                                sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to
                                develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual
                                knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and
                                memorised the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he
                                took the monastic habit in the neighbouring monastery of St. Antony's at
                                Autumo.

                                His fervour from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule
                                perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and
                                cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he
                                migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was
                                received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre (f.d. September 25). He
                                was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its
                                monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many
                                years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful
                                monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and
                                superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of
                                men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished
                                himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and
                                vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other
                                crops was considered miraculous.

                                When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the
                                monastery was placed in Valery's hands until he was sent by Saint
                                Eustasius (f.d. March 29) with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the
                                Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of
                                Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the
                                permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two
                                cells. Saint Valery by his preaching and the example of his virtue,
                                converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the
                                foundation of a monastery.

                                His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the
                                Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time
                                was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual
                                labour. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he
                                often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are
                                in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

                                When Valery died, cures took place at his tomb and his veneration grew,
                                which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William
                                the Conqueror exposed Valery's relics for public veneration. He was
                                invoked for a favourable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed
                                from Saint-Valery

                                Valery is honoured at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a
                                famous monastery arose from his cells. His "vita" was carefully written
                                in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard
                                the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valery-en-Caux;
                                however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the
                                Somme district are called Saint-Valery after him, and there are several
                                dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines,
                                Encyclopaedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).


                                Sources:
                                ========

                                Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                                P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                                Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                                (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                                D'Arcy, M. R. (1974). The Saints of Ireland. Saint Paul, Minnesota:
                                Irish American Cultural Institute. [This is probably the most
                                useful book to choose to own on the Irish saints. The author
                                provides a great deal of historical context in which to place the
                                lives of the saints.]

                                Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                                Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                                Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford dictionary of saints.
                                Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                                Fitzpatrick, B. (1927). Ireland and the Foundations of Europe.
                                New York: Funk & Wagnalls.

                                Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                                Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                                London: Virtue & Co.

                                McCarthy, E. L. (1927). Saint Columban. Society of
                                Saint Columban.

                                Montague, H. P. (1981). The Saints and Martyrs of Ireland.
                                Guildford: Billing & Sons.

                                O'Hanlon, J. (1875). Lives of Irish Saints, 10 vol. Dublin.

                                For All the Saints: - new active link
                                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

                                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West - new active link
                                http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/saintsa.htm

                                These Lives are archived at:
                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
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