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4 April

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  • ambrós
    Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 2 7:26 PM
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      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
      * St. Tigernach of Clogher
      * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
      _______________________________________

      REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
      Julian Calender.
      Drop me a note at emrys@...
      ________________________________________


      St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
      ----------------------------------------------------
      9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
      whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
      Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
      July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


      St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
      (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
      ----------------------------------------------------
      Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
      succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
      While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
      from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
      tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
      a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
      king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
      (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
      he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
      in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
      whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
      was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
      506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
      Husenbeth).

      Another life:

      As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
      written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
      history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
      the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
      father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
      "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
      godmother.

      When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
      adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
      sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
      morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
      advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
      princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
      Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
      the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
      St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
      in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

      The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
      Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
      was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
      of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
      saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
      earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
      teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
      of all.

      Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
      to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
      is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
      accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
      Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
      blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

      As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
      succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
      the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
      buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
      the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
      Flanagan, Neeson).


      Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
      O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
      being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
      on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
      our God to grant us His great mercy.


      St. Merryn (Merin)
      --------------------------------
      6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
      titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
      Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
      period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
      For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
      whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

      Sources:
      ========

      Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
      P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

      Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
      (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

      Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
      (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

      Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
      Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

      Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
      Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
      (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

      Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
      Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
      London: Virtue & Co.

      Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
      (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

      For All the Saints:
      http://users.erols.com/saintpat/ss/ss-index.htm

      Celtic Orthodox Christianity Home Page:
      http://www.orthodoxireland.com/celtic.htm

      A Beginner's Guide to Irish Gaelic pronunciation
      http://www.standingstones.com/gaelpron.html

      These Lives are archived at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
      *****************************************
    • emrys@globe.net.nz
      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 2 10:51 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
        * St. Tigernach of Clogher
        * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
        _______________________________________

        REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
        Julian Calender.
        Drop me a note at emrys@...
        ________________________________________


        St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
        ----------------------------------------------------
        9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
        whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
        Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
        July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


        St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
        (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
        ----------------------------------------------------
        Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
        succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
        While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
        from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
        tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
        a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
        king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
        (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
        he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
        in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
        whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
        was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
        506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
        Husenbeth).

        Another life:

        As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
        written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
        history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
        the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
        father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
        "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
        godmother.

        When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
        adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
        sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
        morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
        advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
        princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
        Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
        the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
        St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
        in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

        The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
        Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
        was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
        of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
        saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
        earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
        teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
        of all.

        Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
        to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
        is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
        accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
        Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
        blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

        As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
        succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
        the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
        buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
        the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
        Flanagan, Neeson).


        Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
        O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
        being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
        on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
        our God to grant us His great mercy.


        St. Merryn (Merin)
        --------------------------------
        6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
        titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
        Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
        period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
        For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
        whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

        Sources:
        ========

        Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
        P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

        Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
        (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

        Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
        (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

        Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
        Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

        Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
        (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
        Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
        London: Virtue & Co.

        Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
        (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

        For All the Saints:
        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

        Orthodox Ireland Saints
        http://www.orthodoxireland.com/saints/

        An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

        These Lives are archived at:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
        *****************************************
      • emrys@globe.net.nz
        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 3 8:45 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
          * St. Tigernach of Clogher
          * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
          _______________________________________

          REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
          Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
          ________________________________________


          St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
          ----------------------------------------------------
          9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
          whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
          Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
          July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


          St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
          (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
          ----------------------------------------------------
          Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
          succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
          While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
          from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
          tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
          a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
          king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
          (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
          he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
          in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
          whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
          was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
          506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
          Husenbeth).

          Another life:

          As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
          written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
          history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
          the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
          father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
          "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
          godmother.

          When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
          adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
          sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
          morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
          advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
          princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
          Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
          the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
          St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
          in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

          The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
          Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
          was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
          of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
          saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
          earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
          teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
          of all.

          Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
          to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
          is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
          accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
          Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
          blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

          As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
          succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
          the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
          buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
          the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
          Flanagan, Neeson).


          Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
          O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
          being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
          on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
          our God to grant us His great mercy.


          St. Merryn (Merin)
          --------------------------------
          6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
          titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
          Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
          period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
          For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
          whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

          Sources:
          ========

          Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
          P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

          Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
          (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

          Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
          (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

          Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
          Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

          Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
          Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

          Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
          Oxford: Oxford University Press.

          Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
          (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

          Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
          Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
          London: Virtue & Co.

          Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
          (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

          For All the Saints:
          http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

          An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
          http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

          These Lives are archived at:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
          *****************************************
        • emrys@globe.net.nz
          Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 3 4:14 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
            * St. Tigernach of Clogher
            * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            _______________________________________

            REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
            Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
            ________________________________________


            St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
            ----------------------------------------------------
            9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
            whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
            Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
            July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


            St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
            (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
            ----------------------------------------------------
            Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
            succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
            While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
            from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
            tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
            a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
            king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
            (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
            he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
            in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
            whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
            was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
            506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
            Husenbeth).

            Another life:

            As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
            written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
            history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
            the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
            father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
            "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
            godmother.

            When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
            adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
            sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
            morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
            advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
            princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
            Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
            the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
            St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
            in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

            The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
            Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
            was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
            of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
            saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
            earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
            teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
            of all.

            Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
            to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
            is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
            accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
            Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
            blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

            As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
            succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
            the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
            buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
            the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
            Flanagan, Neeson).


            Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
            O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
            being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
            on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
            our God to grant us His great mercy.


            St. Merryn (Merin)
            --------------------------------
            6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
            titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
            Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
            period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
            For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
            whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

            Sources:
            ========

            Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
            P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

            Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
            (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

            Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
            (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

            Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
            Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

            Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
            Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

            Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
            Oxford: Oxford University Press.

            Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
            (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

            Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
            Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
            London: Virtue & Co.

            Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
            (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

            For All the Saints:
            http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

            An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
            http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

            These Lives are archived at:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
            ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
          • emrys@globe.net.nz
            Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 4 5:46 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
              * St. Tigernach of Clogher
              * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
              =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
              _______________________________________

              REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
              Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
              ________________________________________


              St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
              ----------------------------------------------------
              9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
              whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
              Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
              July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


              St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
              (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
              ----------------------------------------------------
              Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
              succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
              While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
              from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
              tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
              a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
              king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
              (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
              he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
              in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
              whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
              was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
              506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
              Husenbeth).

              Another life:

              As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
              written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
              history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
              the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
              father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
              "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
              godmother.

              When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
              adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
              sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
              morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
              advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
              princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
              Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
              the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
              St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
              in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

              The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
              Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
              was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
              of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
              saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
              earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
              teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
              of all.

              Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
              to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
              is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
              accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
              Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
              blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

              As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
              succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
              the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
              buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
              the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
              Flanagan, Neeson).


              Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
              O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
              being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
              on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
              our God to grant us His great mercy.


              St. Merryn (Merin)
              --------------------------------
              6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
              titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
              Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
              period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
              For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
              whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

              Sources:
              ========

              Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
              P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

              Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
              (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

              Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
              (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

              Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
              Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

              Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
              Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

              Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
              Oxford: Oxford University Press.

              Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
              (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

              Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
              Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
              London: Virtue & Co.

              Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
              (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

              For All the Saints:
              http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

              An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
              http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

              These Lives are archived at:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
              ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
            • emrys@globe.net.nz
              Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 3 4:59 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
                * St. Tigernach of Clogher
                * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                _______________________________________

                REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
                Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
                ________________________________________


                St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
                ----------------------------------------------------
                9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
                whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
                Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
                July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


                St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
                (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
                ----------------------------------------------------
                Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
                succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
                While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
                from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
                tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
                a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
                king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
                (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
                he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
                in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
                whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
                was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
                506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
                Husenbeth).

                Another life:

                As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
                written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
                history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
                the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
                father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
                "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
                godmother.

                When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
                adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
                sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
                morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
                advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
                princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
                Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
                the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
                St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
                in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

                The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
                Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
                was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
                of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
                saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
                earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
                teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
                of all.

                Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
                to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
                is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
                accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
                Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
                blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

                As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
                succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
                the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
                buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
                the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
                Flanagan, Neeson).


                Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
                O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
                being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
                on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
                our God to grant us His great mercy.


                St. Merryn (Merin)
                --------------------------------
                6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
                titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
                Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
                period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
                For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
                whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

                Sources:
                ========

                Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
                (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

                Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                London: Virtue & Co.

                Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
                (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

                For All the Saints:
                http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                These Lives are archived at:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
              • emrys@globe.net.nz
                Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 3 5:40 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
                  * St. Tigernach of Clogher
                  * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
                  =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                  _______________________________________

                  REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
                  Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
                  ________________________________________


                  St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
                  whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
                  Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
                  July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


                  St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
                  (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
                  succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
                  While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
                  from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
                  tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
                  a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
                  king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
                  (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
                  he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
                  in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
                  whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
                  was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
                  506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
                  Husenbeth).

                  Another life:

                  As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
                  written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
                  history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
                  the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
                  father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
                  "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
                  godmother.

                  When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
                  adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
                  sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
                  morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
                  advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
                  princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
                  Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
                  the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
                  St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
                  in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

                  The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
                  Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
                  was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
                  of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
                  saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
                  earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
                  teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
                  of all.

                  Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
                  to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
                  is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
                  accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
                  Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
                  blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

                  As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
                  succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
                  the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
                  buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
                  the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
                  Flanagan, Neeson).


                  Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
                  O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
                  being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
                  on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
                  our God to grant us His great mercy.


                  St. Merryn (Merin)
                  --------------------------------
                  6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
                  titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
                  Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
                  period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
                  For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
                  whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

                  Sources:
                  ========

                  Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                  P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                  Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                  (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                  Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                  (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                  Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                  Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                  Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                  Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                  Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                  Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
                  (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

                  Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                  Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                  London: Virtue & Co.

                  Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
                  (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

                  For All the Saints:
                  http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                  An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                  http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                  These Lives are archived at:
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                  ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                • emrys@globe.net.nz
                  Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 2 5:35 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
                    * St. Tigernach of Clogher
                    * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    _______________________________________

                    REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
                    Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
                    ________________________________________


                    St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
                    ----------------------------------------------------
                    9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
                    whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
                    Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
                    July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


                    St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
                    (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
                    ----------------------------------------------------
                    Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
                    succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
                    While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
                    from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
                    tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
                    a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
                    king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
                    (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
                    he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
                    in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
                    whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
                    was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
                    506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
                    Husenbeth).

                    Another life:

                    As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
                    written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
                    history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
                    the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
                    father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
                    "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
                    godmother.

                    When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
                    adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
                    sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
                    morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
                    advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
                    princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
                    Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
                    the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
                    St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
                    in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

                    The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
                    Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
                    was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
                    of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
                    saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
                    earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
                    teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
                    of all.

                    Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
                    to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
                    is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
                    accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
                    Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
                    blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

                    As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
                    succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
                    the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
                    buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
                    the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
                    Flanagan, Neeson).


                    Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
                    O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
                    being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
                    on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
                    our God to grant us His great mercy.


                    St. Merryn (Merin)
                    --------------------------------
                    6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
                    titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
                    Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
                    period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
                    For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
                    whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

                    Sources:
                    ========

                    Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                    P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                    Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                    (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                    Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                    (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                    Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                    Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                    Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                    Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                    Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                    Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                    Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
                    (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

                    Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                    Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                    London: Virtue & Co.

                    Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
                    (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

                    For All the Saints:
                    http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                    An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                    http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                    These Lives are archived at:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                    ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                  • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                    Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 3 9:06 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                      * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
                      * St. Tigernach of Clogher
                      * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
                      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                      _______________________________________

                      REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
                      Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
                      ________________________________________


                      St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
                      ----------------------------------------------------
                      9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
                      whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
                      Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
                      July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


                      St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
                      (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
                      ----------------------------------------------------
                      Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
                      succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
                      While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
                      from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
                      tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
                      a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
                      king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
                      (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
                      he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
                      in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
                      whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
                      was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
                      506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
                      Husenbeth).

                      Another life:

                      As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
                      written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
                      history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
                      the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
                      father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
                      "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
                      godmother.

                      When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
                      adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
                      sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
                      morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
                      advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
                      princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
                      Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
                      the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
                      St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
                      in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

                      The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
                      Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
                      was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
                      of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
                      saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
                      earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
                      teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
                      of all.

                      Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
                      to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
                      is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
                      accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
                      Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
                      blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

                      As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
                      succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
                      the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
                      buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
                      the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
                      Flanagan, Neeson).


                      Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
                      O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
                      being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
                      on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
                      our God to grant us His great mercy.


                      St. Merryn (Merin)
                      --------------------------------
                      6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
                      titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
                      Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
                      period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
                      For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
                      whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

                      Sources:
                      ========

                      Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                      P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                      Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                      (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                      Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                      (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                      Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                      Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                      Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                      Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                      Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                      Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                      Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
                      (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

                      Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                      Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                      London: Virtue & Co.

                      Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
                      (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

                      For All the Saints:
                      http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                      An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                      http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                      These Lives are archived at:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                      ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                    • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                      Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 3 7:38 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                        * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
                        * St. Tigernach of Clogher
                        * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
                        =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                        _______________________________________

                        REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
                        Julian Calender. Drop me a note at ambrois@...
                        ________________________________________


                        St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
                        ----------------------------------------------------
                        9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
                        whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
                        Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
                        July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


                        St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
                        (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
                        ----------------------------------------------------
                        Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
                        succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
                        While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
                        from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
                        tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
                        a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
                        king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
                        (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
                        he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
                        in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
                        whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
                        was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
                        506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
                        Husenbeth).

                        Another life:

                        As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
                        written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
                        history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
                        the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
                        father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
                        "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
                        godmother.

                        When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
                        adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
                        sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
                        morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
                        advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
                        princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
                        Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
                        the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
                        St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
                        in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

                        The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
                        Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
                        was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
                        of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
                        saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
                        earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
                        teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
                        of all.

                        Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
                        to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
                        is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
                        accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
                        Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
                        blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

                        As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
                        succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
                        the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
                        buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
                        the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
                        Flanagan, Neeson).


                        Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
                        O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
                        being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
                        on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
                        our God to grant us His great mercy.


                        St. Merryn (Merin)
                        --------------------------------
                        6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
                        titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
                        Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
                        period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
                        For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
                        whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

                        Sources:
                        ========

                        Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                        P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                        Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                        (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                        Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                        (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                        Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                        Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                        Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                        Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                        Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                        Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                        Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
                        (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

                        Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                        Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                        London: Virtue & Co.

                        Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
                        (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

                        For All the Saints:
                        http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/ss-index.htm

                        An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West
                        http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/saintsa.htm

                        These Lives are archived at:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                        ¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤
                      • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
                        Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= * St. Gwerir of Liskeard * St. Tigernach of Clogher * St. Merryn of Cornwall
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 3 11:37 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Celtic and Old English Saints 4 April

                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                          * St. Gwerir of Liskeard
                          * St. Tigernach of Clogher
                          * St. Merryn of Cornwall and Brittany
                          =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                          _______________________________________

                          REMINDER: You can receive the Saints' Lives on the
                          Julian Calender. Drop me a note at emrys@...
                          ________________________________________


                          St. Gwerir (Guier) of Liskeard, Hermit
                          ----------------------------------------------------
                          9th century. A taciturn hermit monk in Liskeard, Cornwall, England, at
                          whose grave King Alfred is said to have been cured of a serious illness.
                          Saint Gwerir's cell was occupied after his death by Saint Neot (f.d.
                          July 31) (Benedictines, Encyclopaedia).


                          St. Tigernach of Clogher, Bishop
                          (Tigernake, Tierney, Tierry, Terry)
                          ----------------------------------------------------
                          Died 549. Abbot Saint Tigernach of Cluanois (Clones) Abbey in Monaghan
                          succeeded Saint Macartan (f.d. March 26) as bishop of Clogher, Ireland.
                          While the details of his life are unreliable because they were written
                          from tradition centuries after his death, he is said to have had a
                          tragic childhood and to have died blind. They say that he was the son of
                          a famous general named Corbre and Dearfraych, the daughter of an Irish
                          king named Eochod. He was baptized by Bishop Saint Conleth of Kildare
                          (f.d. May 3) with Saint Brigid as his godmother. While still a youth,
                          he was captured by pirates and taken to the British king, who placed him
                          in the monastery of Rosnat. There he learned to serve God with his
                          whole heart, mind, soul, and strength. When he returned to Ireland, he
                          was reluctantly consecrated bishop, and, upon the death of Macartan in
                          506, took over that see (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopaedia,
                          Husenbeth).

                          Another life:

                          As Tighernach, or Tierney, lived in the sixth century and his Life was
                          written some six hundred years later, it is difficult to sort out the
                          history from the legends that have surrounded him. It seems that he was
                          the illegitimate son of a princess of Clogher, by Corib, one of her
                          father's nobles, and was given the name Tighernach, which means
                          "chieftain". At his baptism St. Brigid is said to have been his
                          godmother.

                          When still a child, Tighernach was kidnapped by raiders from Britain and
                          adopted by a petty king, who put him to bed with his two sons, but his
                          sanctity seems to have had a stifling affect on the boys and in the
                          morning they were found dead. A holy man, St. Morwen, was called in and
                          advised that the holy infant should be put between the two little
                          princes, and this time his sanctity revived them. St. Morwen took
                          Tighernach to his monastery, at a place called Rosnat. This was probably
                          the famous Candida Casa at Whithorn, and the holy man none other than
                          St. Ninian, although some think it was Menevia and St. David. However,
                          in this monastery, Tighernach received his education.

                          The Life says that he visited Rome and Tours before returning to
                          Ireland, where a prince named Fiachra gave him land in Munster, and he
                          was made a bishop. He had a lot of visitors including Duach, the Bishop
                          of Armagh, who was taken ill on his journey home but was cured by the
                          saint. On this occasion Duach is reported to have said, "Tighernach on
                          earth, Tighernach in heaven", presumably referring to our Lord's
                          teaching that he that would be chief among His disciples must be servant
                          of all.

                          Tighernach did much to induce a more civilized behaviour by warriors and
                          to dissuade them from mutilating the dead and injured after a battle. He
                          is also credited with many miracles. On the death of St. Maccarthan, he
                          accepted the see of Clogher, and later founded another monastery at
                          Clones, where he resided. For the last thirty years of his life he was
                          blind, and spent most of his time in his cell, in prayer and meditation.

                          As his end approached, he appointed his beloved disciple Comgall to
                          succeed him as abbot in his principal monastery and retired to die in
                          the other. The date of his death is given as April 4th 550, and he is
                          buried at Clones, where there is a carved High Cross, a round tower and
                          the remains of the monastic church (Baring Gould, Fisher, Bowen,
                          Flanagan, Neeson).


                          Troparion of St Tigernach Tone l
                          O holy Tigernach, thou didst glorify God as Abbot of Clones/ before
                          being called to the episcopate./ As once thou didst shepherd thy flock
                          on earth so now, in company with the Angels in heaven,/ pray to Christ
                          our God to grant us His great mercy.


                          St. Merryn (Merin)
                          --------------------------------
                          6th century. Missionary in Cornwall and Brittany. Saint Merryn is the
                          titular patron of a place in Cornwall. He may be identical with the
                          Breton saint honoured at Lanmerin and Plomelin. During the medieval
                          period, the legendary Saint Marina was believed to have been its patron.
                          For this reason, the Cornish St. Merryn observes the feast on July 7,
                          whereas the Breton feast is on April 4 (Farmer).

                          Sources:
                          ========

                          Attwater, D. (1958). A Dictionary of Saints. New York:
                          P. J. Kenedy & Sons. [Attwater 2]

                          Baring-Gould,S & Fisher, J.The Lives of the British Saints
                          (4 volumes: Charles J Clarke, 1907)

                          Benedictine Monks of Saint Augustine Abbey, Ramsgate.
                          (1947). The Book of saints. NY: Macmillan.

                          Bowen, Paul. When We Were One: A Yearbook of the
                          Saints of the British Isles Complied from Ancient Calendars.

                          Encyclopaedia of Catholic Saints, March. (1966).
                          Philadelphia: Chilton Books.

                          Farmer, D. H. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of Saints.
                          Oxford: Oxford University Press.

                          Flanagan, L A. Chronicle of Irish Saints
                          (The Blackstaff Press, Belfast, 1990)

                          Husenbeth, Rev. F. C., DD, VG (ed.). (1928). Butler's
                          Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints.
                          London: Virtue & Co.

                          Neeson, E. The Book of Irish Saints
                          (The Mercier Press, Cork, 1967)

                          For All the Saints: - new active link
                          http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

                          An Alphabetical Index of the Saints of the West - new active link
                          http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/saintsa.htm

                          These Lives are archived at:
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/celt-saints
                          ������������������������������������
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