Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

No shortcuts with urethane

Expand Messages
  • Charles Scott
    I ve posted about trying the wipe on method for urethaning the hull and achieving a satisfactory coat in the past few weeks. I had sold my first canoe to a
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 5, 2013
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I've posted about trying the wipe on method for urethaning the hull
      and achieving a satisfactory coat in the past few weeks. I had sold
      my first canoe to a couple who live down in Florida and they wanted to
      display it outside their house as an "Object D'art" so to speak,
      rather than paddle it much. The canoe had been stuck in the rafters
      of my car port for three years and was a bit dusty and was showing the
      effects of earlier paddles before we more or less permanently hung it
      up for something lighter and more stable.

      So I was committed to refurbishing it for the new owners who had
      committed not only to purchasing it, but paying for shipping from
      Vermont to Florida.

      But I had never had great luck simply applying urethane. Inevitably
      on the vertical surfaces, it eventually sagged or dripped or seemed
      unevenly applied, no matter how hard I concentrated. A note here, I'm
      not a perfectionist, but I feel I'm skilled and experienced enough to
      be able to apply a coating of something and not be totally disgusted
      with the results. But urethane has been tantalizingly out of reach in
      terms of achieving what I thought ought to be achievable. I thought
      I'd found the solution when I tried the "wipe on" method for applying
      urethane. It takes many coats to achieve a nice finish, but each coat
      dries quickly and you can cover a lot of surface with a pad of cotton
      rag. But despite the advantages, I've learned that you still have to
      pay attention. You cannot apply too much at once and you need to
      squeeze out the pad prior to applying so that you don't apply too much
      in one place. Because the urethane is thinned by a 1: 1 ratio, it
      dries quickly. But you can still overdo it, I discovered.

      Patience is a virtue when it comes to urethane. You just cannot rush
      things if you want a smooth finish. You have to make sure that as you
      wipe on, you overlap and smooth things out. Having lighting that
      allows you to see what you just applied is vital. You have to look at
      an angle for every stroke and make sure that what you're doing is
      melding with the previous coat. If you don't, you will have to
      re-sand and try again, and again.

      But I'm finally at a point where each coat is beginning to cover and
      show nicely.

      One thing I've read about is that some builders polished their
      surfaces. I'd like to try that but there doesn't seem to be much
      information about that technique. Can anyone step in here and
      comment?

      Thanks, Corky Scott

      Sent from my iPad
    • Jim Marco
      Corky, I think I would avoid polishing. I tried that on a couple boats, but, needed to do a 100% sanding to recoat them at the end of a season (following
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 14, 2013
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Corky,
        I think I would avoid polishing. I tried that on a couple boats, but, needed to do a 100% sanding to recoat them at the end of a season (following spring, I should say.) For some things it makes sense, but many polishes (like Butchers Wax and others) will get into every scratch, meaning that it needs to be removed before recoating. It will add a measure of water repellency to a clean surface, though.
        My thoughts only . . .
        jdm

        -----Original Message-----
        From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charles Scott
        Sent: Friday, July 05, 2013 1:49 PM
        To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] No shortcuts with urethane

        I've posted about trying the wipe on method for urethaning the hull and achieving a satisfactory coat in the past few weeks. I had sold my first canoe to a couple who live down in Florida and they wanted to display it outside their house as an "Object D'art" so to speak, rather than paddle it much. The canoe had been stuck in the rafters of my car port for three years and was a bit dusty and was showing the effects of earlier paddles before we more or less permanently hung it up for something lighter and more stable.

        So I was committed to refurbishing it for the new owners who had committed not only to purchasing it, but paying for shipping from Vermont to Florida.

        But I had never had great luck simply applying urethane. Inevitably on the vertical surfaces, it eventually sagged or dripped or seemed unevenly applied, no matter how hard I concentrated. A note here, I'm not a perfectionist, but I feel I'm skilled and experienced enough to be able to apply a coating of something and not be totally disgusted with the results. But urethane has been tantalizingly out of reach in terms of achieving what I thought ought to be achievable. I thought I'd found the solution when I tried the "wipe on" method for applying urethane. It takes many coats to achieve a nice finish, but each coat dries quickly and you can cover a lot of surface with a pad of cotton rag. But despite the advantages, I've learned that you still have to pay attention. You cannot apply too much at once and you need to squeeze out the pad prior to applying so that you don't apply too much in one place. Because the urethane is thinned by a 1: 1 ratio, it dries quickly. But you can still overdo it, I discovered.

        Patience is a virtue when it comes to urethane. You just cannot rush things if you want a smooth finish. You have to make sure that as you wipe on, you overlap and smooth things out. Having lighting that allows you to see what you just applied is vital. You have to look at an angle for every stroke and make sure that what you're doing is melding with the previous coat. If you don't, you will have to re-sand and try again, and again.

        But I'm finally at a point where each coat is beginning to cover and show nicely.

        One thing I've read about is that some builders polished their surfaces. I'd like to try that but there doesn't seem to be much information about that technique. Can anyone step in here and comment?

        Thanks, Corky Scott

        Sent from my iPad


        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.