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Out of the cradle and onto the scale

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  • Charles & Dana Scott
    I finished installing the seats this morning which means the canoe is done, other than varnishing the wooden dowels that conceal the carriage bolts. I decided
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 11, 2010
      I finished installing the seats this morning which means the canoe is done,
      other than varnishing the wooden dowels that conceal the carriage bolts. I
      decided that it was time to see how heavy it was. If it was light enough, I
      should be able to lift it up out of the cradle and carry it outside. So I
      slid the massive sliding shop door open and pulled the canoe up by it's
      gunwales, pulling on the opposite side until it was sitting on it's side.
      Then I crouched down and hefted it onto my shoulders. I carefully swung it
      around until it was pointing outside, and walked it out. It wasn't bad,
      much lighter than the Winisk, and the thwart shaped to fit my shoulders
      worked nicely.



      Then I went back inside the house and brought out the bathroom scale and set
      it on a piece of stiff plywood. I picked the canoe up by the gunwale and
      walked it to the scale and set the canoe down on the scale so that the canoe
      was resting on it's side. It didn't want to stay that way of course so I
      had to hold on to it and balance it while trying to hold it still so that
      the scale would stop fluctuating. I finally decided that it was about 52
      lbs.



      I haven't tried that method of weighing the Winisk, but it's MUCH more
      difficult to lift onto my shoulders. I have to lower it onto two saw horses
      and be very careful about getting my legs ready to push up because it's
      quite a load.



      But I can easily carry the Freedom 15 simply by grabbing onto the middle of
      the gunwale and lifting it up. I got it off my back and onto the ground by
      squatting down and leaning to one side.



      I'm not done with it yet, I'm still fussing with the hull's finish. I've
      got it back inside the shop again, this time on saw horses as I've
      dismantled the strongback while the canoe was outside. I'm not satisfied
      with the last coat of varnish so it's getting sanded down for another try.
      I may have to wipe the varnish on with a cloth to satisfy my quest for a
      smooth finish. That works, I've done it before, but it puts such a thin
      layer of varnish on that you have to do it four or five times to get enough
      coverage.



      I'm not trying to be a perfectionist, I just know I can do better. A young
      woman I know who built a stripper kayak came over to walk up the
      mountain/hill in back of our house and she parked just around the corner.
      Her kayak was on the car. I went down to look over the job she'd done and
      it was obvious she'd had no one to show her how to apply epoxy, or rather
      what to do once it had cured. It looked like the epoxy had been applied
      with a trowel, and no attempt had been made to sand it smooth before calling
      it done.



      I don't think it's too over the top to try to get a finish that is
      reasonably smooth. We're into the heating season now so I'm going to have
      to heat up the shop to varnish. I have a forced hot air furnace that I'm
      pretty sure stirs up the air and causes dust to coat the wet varnish. That
      I can deal with, what I'm striving for is to apply the varnish so that it
      dries smooth. The hull has to be smooth before the varnish is applied, but
      the varnish has to lay out smooth too.



      Corky Scott



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James D. Marco
      Corky, Yeah, the Winisk sounds heavy. I usually just step on the scale without the boat, then once again with the boat on my shoulders. A bit more accurate
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 11, 2010
        Corky,
        Yeah, the Winisk sounds heavy. I usually just step on the scale
        without the boat, then once again with the boat on my shoulders. A bit
        more accurate than trying to balance it. 52# sounds good. Could have
        been quite a bit heavier!
        A few coats of varnish will add a little. Dust is always the big
        bug-a-boo. Even walking around the shop will stir some up. I vacuum
        stuff before trying to finish...even then it never comes out all that great.
        Rubbing it down helps a lot.
        Yeah, I know what you mean about her boat. I have seen some
        really nice looking boats, with thick, really thick epoxy coatings. Closer,
        they look pretty poor. Mostly it is sanding, but many times, they also
        allowed the fiberglass to float up. You cannot sand it clean without also
        sanding into and through the glass.
        Anyway, Good Luck with your final coats!
        jdm


        At 03:33 PM 10/11/2010, you wrote:
        >I finished installing the seats this morning which means the canoe is done,
        >other than varnishing the wooden dowels that conceal the carriage bolts. I
        >decided that it was time to see how heavy it was. If it was light enough, I
        >should be able to lift it up out of the cradle and carry it outside. So I
        >slid the massive sliding shop door open and pulled the canoe up by it's
        >gunwales, pulling on the opposite side until it was sitting on it's side.
        >Then I crouched down and hefted it onto my shoulders. I carefully swung it
        >around until it was pointing outside, and walked it out. It wasn't bad,
        >much lighter than the Winisk, and the thwart shaped to fit my shoulders
        >worked nicely.
        >
        >
        >
        >Then I went back inside the house and brought out the bathroom scale and set
        >it on a piece of stiff plywood. I picked the canoe up by the gunwale and
        >walked it to the scale and set the canoe down on the scale so that the canoe
        >was resting on it's side. It didn't want to stay that way of course so I
        >had to hold on to it and balance it while trying to hold it still so that
        >the scale would stop fluctuating. I finally decided that it was about 52
        >lbs.
        >
        >
        >
        >I haven't tried that method of weighing the Winisk, but it's MUCH more
        >difficult to lift onto my shoulders. I have to lower it onto two saw horses
        >and be very careful about getting my legs ready to push up because it's
        >quite a load.
        >
        >
        >
        >But I can easily carry the Freedom 15 simply by grabbing onto the middle of
        >the gunwale and lifting it up. I got it off my back and onto the ground by
        >squatting down and leaning to one side.
        >
        >
        >
        >I'm not done with it yet, I'm still fussing with the hull's finish. I've
        >got it back inside the shop again, this time on saw horses as I've
        >dismantled the strongback while the canoe was outside. I'm not satisfied
        >with the last coat of varnish so it's getting sanded down for another try.
        >I may have to wipe the varnish on with a cloth to satisfy my quest for a
        >smooth finish. That works, I've done it before, but it puts such a thin
        >layer of varnish on that you have to do it four or five times to get enough
        >coverage.
        >
        >
        >
        >I'm not trying to be a perfectionist, I just know I can do better. A young
        >woman I know who built a stripper kayak came over to walk up the
        >mountain/hill in back of our house and she parked just around the corner.
        >Her kayak was on the car. I went down to look over the job she'd done and
        >it was obvious she'd had no one to show her how to apply epoxy, or rather
        >what to do once it had cured. It looked like the epoxy had been applied
        >with a trowel, and no attempt had been made to sand it smooth before calling
        >it done.
        >
        >
        >
        >I don't think it's too over the top to try to get a finish that is
        >reasonably smooth. We're into the heating season now so I'm going to have
        >to heat up the shop to varnish. I have a forced hot air furnace that I'm
        >pretty sure stirs up the air and causes dust to coat the wet varnish. That
        >I can deal with, what I'm striving for is to apply the varnish so that it
        >dries smooth. The hull has to be smooth before the varnish is applied, but
        >the varnish has to lay out smooth too.
        >
        >
        >
        >Corky Scott
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