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Gunwales Questions

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  • drippy70
    I m about to glass and epoxy the inner hull of my Huron Cruiser which means I need to settle on details for gunwale design. I read that people replace their
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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      I'm about to glass and epoxy the inner hull of my Huron Cruiser which means I need to settle on details for gunwale design.

      I read that people replace their gunwales. Do you glue and use screws to attach the gunwales or just screws or just glue?

      Do you pre-bend the gunwale stock before applying it to avoid mis-shaping the hull?

      What's the preferred dimensions of the inner and outer gunwales I intend to scarf join black walnut or cherry or ash. It seems that dimensions I see in my reference books are larger than what I'm reading here.

      My wife asked if she could have my Huron Cruiser strongback. She wants to paint it and use it for a jump in the riding arena. She's serious. What would you do? (grin)

      Thanks.

      Newbie Steve
    • Charles & Dana Scott
      Steve, the shape of the hull in the water is what gives the canoe it s speed and/or stability. The hull at the waterline won t change all that much regardless
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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        Steve, the shape of the hull in the water is what gives the canoe it's speed
        and/or stability. The hull at the waterline won't change all that much
        regardless what you use for gunwale material. If you put the thwart, or
        thwarts in the places where the plans say they should be, you will achieve
        the shape the designers wanted.



        Gunwales can be attached with bolts, screws, or bonded without any attaching
        hardware.



        As to giving your strongback to your wife for her to use as a horse jump,
        that's a no brainer: Of COURSE give it to her. She'll thank you, perhaps
        even be impressed by your generosity, and you can always retrieve it in the
        future should you want to fabricate another canoe. ;-) If you paint it
        yourself, so as to protect it from the elements, so much the better.



        Corky Scott



        _____

        From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of drippy70
        Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 10:07 AM
        To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Gunwales Questions





        I'm about to glass and epoxy the inner hull of my Huron Cruiser which means
        I need to settle on details for gunwale design.

        I read that people replace their gunwales. Do you glue and use screws to
        attach the gunwales or just screws or just glue?

        Do you pre-bend the gunwale stock before applying it to avoid mis-shaping
        the hull?

        What's the preferred dimensions of the inner and outer gunwales I intend to
        scarf join black walnut or cherry or ash. It seems that dimensions I see in
        my reference books are larger than what I'm reading here.

        My wife asked if she could have my Huron Cruiser strongback. She wants to
        paint it and use it for a jump in the riding arena. She's serious. What
        would you do? (grin)

        Thanks.

        Newbie Steve





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John
        Steve, I am going to disagree with Corky on giving your wife the strongback. Make her a jump with an adjustable a jump rail that will fall if the horse or
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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          Steve,

          I am going to disagree with Corky on giving your wife the strongback.

          Make her a jump with an adjustable a jump rail that will fall if the horse or rider should hit it. Google - horse jump plans (a 4 x 4, 2 ea 2 x 6 and some dowel). It would be easier and safer on the horse and rider as your strong back won't give. Just make the 2 end towers and use a section of 3" or 4" PVC pipe for the rail. She can then start the horse(s) jumping low rails and move the rail higher over time. It will also be easier to move (lighter weight) in the arena that the strong back (heavy). The added benefit for you is you still have the strong back to build you next canoe.
        • Charles & Dana Scott
          My lack of experience with horses and jumping them is showing. I agree with Steve on his very sensible suggestion. Corky Scott _____ From:
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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            My lack of experience with horses and jumping them is showing. I agree with
            Steve on his very sensible suggestion.



            Corky Scott



            _____

            From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John
            Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:06 AM
            To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gunwales Questions





            Steve,

            I am going to disagree with Corky on giving your wife the strongback.

            Make her a jump with an adjustable a jump rail that will fall if the horse
            or rider should hit it. Google - horse jump plans (a 4 x 4, 2 ea 2 x 6 and
            some dowel). It would be easier and safer on the horse and rider as your
            strong back won't give. Just make the 2 end towers and use a section of 3"
            or 4" PVC pipe for the rail. She can then start the horse(s) jumping low
            rails and move the rail higher over time. It will also be easier to move
            (lighter weight) in the arena that the strong back (heavy). The added
            benefit for you is you still have the strong back to build you next canoe.

            ___



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James D. Marco
            Ha ha... A good suggestion, from the horses viewpoint! jdm ... James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support Chemical and Biomolecular
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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              Ha ha...
              A good suggestion, from the horses viewpoint!
              jdm




              At 11:56 AM 4/1/2010, you wrote:
              >My lack of experience with horses and jumping them is showing. I agree with
              >Steve on his very sensible suggestion.
              >
              >
              >
              >Corky Scott
              >
              >
              >
              > _____
              >
              >From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
              >[mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John
              >Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:06 AM
              >To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gunwales Questions
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >Steve,
              >
              >I am going to disagree with Corky on giving your wife the strongback.
              >
              >Make her a jump with an adjustable a jump rail that will fall if the horse
              >or rider should hit it. Google - horse jump plans (a 4 x 4, 2 ea 2 x 6 and
              >some dowel). It would be easier and safer on the horse and rider as your
              >strong back won't give. Just make the 2 end towers and use a section of 3"
              >or 4" PVC pipe for the rail. She can then start the horse(s) jumping low
              >rails and move the rail higher over time. It will also be easier to move
              >(lighter weight) in the arena that the strong back (heavy). The added
              >benefit for you is you still have the strong back to build you next canoe.
              >
              >___
              >
              >
              >
              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
              Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
              B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
              Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • James D. Marco
              Steve, Well, for wood, there are four basic types of gunnels. 1) Single piece (usually the outwale) 2) Two piece (almost the standard, scuppers are a variation
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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                Steve,
                Well, for wood, there are four basic types of gunnels.
                1) Single piece (usually the outwale)
                2) Two piece (almost the standard, scuppers are a variation on this.)
                3) Wrap (usually a slot is cut up the center)
                4) none (often found in racing boats, and some odd designs....)
                Other materials:
                Aluminum, plastic, fiberglass roll, etc.... skipping these.

                Function:
                Complete the "cylinder" of a canoe and maintain stiffness.
                Incidentally mount seats, thwarts, yokes. Provide a wear strip for
                car topping and handling.
                Single:
                I have used this type on the first boat. This was a short (12'2")
                beamy (38" wide) boat and had strong curves. The mahogany reinforced
                the sides and provided an attachment for oarlocks. Since it had strong curves
                I didn't really need the inner, and dispensed with it on the second set. (The
                original cracked after it flew off the car and was jigsawed off.) Also, it was
                17" deep and picked up a lot of wind. But it would hold about 900 pounds,
                easily.
                Double:
                Many types. I'll probably use this again. Two pieces are bent between
                the inner and outer hull. Then they are screwed through the hull. Scuppers
                may be added to improve stiffness, important if you expect to encounter larger
                waves or white water. A twisty, flexible boat is often slower to respond and can
                waste energy in waves. This is what most builders use, or a variation of this.

                Wrap or Cap Rail:
                This is a single piece that has a notch in the center. It is often glued down
                permanently, then fiber glassed over...at least the outside. Much more difficult during
                wetout. I think Tim sent a link about these. Very good for weight, since the fiberglass
                bend at the top adds strength and you can make them smaller. I used them on the
                second boat, but the fiberglass would come unlaminated after a few trips. Going
                around the whole gunnel wasn't possible with the fiberglass I had...it just was not
                wide enough. After several patches, I removed it and went with a double rather than
                adding more weight with fiberglass.

                None:
                This is usually the norm for racing boats. The upper hull is stiffened by the
                addition of a third layer of graphite cloth, often rolled. This is more of a manufactured
                process and requires fine tolerances, since the graphite is a bit stiffer. Anyway, this
                is more of a specialty item. Though there was at least one boat out there that was
                built like that. Hmm...I can't find the link in a quick search....

                Attachment of the gunnels: Corky already did a pretty good job describing that stuff.
                I have found that not using glue(epoxy) was the best. If they get really dinged up they
                are easy to replace. But, if you are sure about thwarts, yokes and seats, go ahead an glue
                them. I think the hull will pick up more damage than the gunnels. That said, I parked a
                boat at a dock overnight and the wave action dug a deep gouge into one gunnel after
                destroying a life jacket I was using as a bumper. Soo, things can happen, too. (Like,
                always remove the boat from the water....live and learn...I was young and being dumb.)
                I don't do whitewater, generally speaking, so, my gunnels are probably lighter
                than what would otherwise be called for.
                Anyway, I used 5/4 mahogany for three boats. 3/8"x1" on the inner and 1/2"x1" on
                the outer. With the hull and 2 layers of fiberglass sandwiched between. The curve of the
                boards was placed opposite. Simply flip the inner over. This will not straighten it but it
                comes pretty close. The inner was routed with a 3/8" roundover bit except at the thwarts
                and yoke... Since I didn't have blueprints, I had to do this after. Soo, they were on, off, on,
                and off. Another reason for no glue.
                I never had a reason for bending them before hand. Even Winonah sent me
                some that were just straight.
                The outer was routed with a 1/2" cove bit set a little shallow, so there was about an
                1/8" left on the bottom. Then just hand sanded clean. Mahogany is pretty soft. I could have
                used a 3/8" bit, but I didn't have one. The top was routed with a 1/4" round over bit. Again,
                a little shallow. (The outer gunwale turns a bit of water. You cannot stop the water, but you
                CAN redirect it.)
                This was a bit painful to route, soo a third strip of pine was cut to act as a holder for
                the router. An inch is not enough to stabilize the router on. Allow for both radius with the
                screw hole layouts and you can screw it down for routing if you attempt this. The 3/8 pilot
                hole will just fit between the routes. 'Corse, with the Huron, you could go larger and never
                notice the weight.
                Yes, the gunnels will try to push any tumblehome out. On two of my boats I added
                extra, thinking that when it did, it would be compensated for. The first was a tandem and
                that worked OK. Only two small places of tumble home were added in. On the second, I
                continued the tumble home down the hull and it did push it out a bit. This caused a slight
                flattening of the bottom of the boat. This in turn caused a reverse rocker...not good. My
                thought was to improve stiffness of the whole boat by increasing the tumblehome for the
                length of the hull. The yoke saved me though. Cutting it to the dimension I had designed
                for, left it about 1" short. After installation, the reverse rocker (slight) went away, and the
                boat came out OK. But, I was worried about it after adding the gunnels. I had designed in
                a 1/2" rocker, now there is less than a 1/4". Most of the flatness went away and much of
                the tumblehome returned. But, sharply curved tumblhomes are not a good idea on most
                boats. Soo, I pretty much did away with the tumblehome on smaller boats, including the
                Nimble Weed. Though, the overall stiffness of the boat I tried it on was really good. I need
                to balance out some of the overall design characteristics of the wood, gunnels, thwarts,
                rocker, flare, stability, etc a bit better before I go back to playing with it again. Always room
                to learn more. This was a mistake that worked out, but which can be avoided. From a
                print, you should be fine, Steve. Stick with the print and what it calls for at this stage.
                Once the scarfs are made, you can pretty much ignore them. Other than not putting
                the joints on the inner and outer together, that is. Theoretically speaking, they should be
                as strong as the wood. That is about the same as spelling assume.
                My thoughts only . . .
                jdm
                At 10:07 AM 4/1/2010, you wrote:
                >I'm about to glass and epoxy the inner hull of my Huron Cruiser which means I need to settle on details for gunwale design.
                >
                >I read that people replace their gunwales. Do you glue and use screws to attach the gunwales or just screws or just glue?
                >
                >Do you pre-bend the gunwale stock before applying it to avoid mis-shaping the hull?
                >
                >What's the preferred dimensions of the inner and outer gunwales I intend to scarf join black walnut or cherry or ash. It seems that dimensions I see in my reference books are larger than what I'm reading here.
                >
                >My wife asked if she could have my Huron Cruiser strongback. She wants to paint it and use it for a jump in the riding arena. She's serious. What would you do? (grin)
                >
                >Thanks.
                >
                >Newbie Steve
                >
                >
                >
                >------------------------------------
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
                Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
                B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
                Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • drippy70
                Thanks for the input on my gunwale questions. I do have instructions from Bear Mountain Boats that were sent along with the plans. I forgot what they said
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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                  Thanks for the input on my gunwale questions. I do have instructions from Bear Mountain Boats that were sent along with the plans. I forgot what they said about gunwales because frankly I've read so much other stuff as well. I'll have to go back and read the instructions.

                  As for the horse jump, my wife's arena is full of proper jumps, barrels, trotting poles, tarps, and whatever else. I think she figures that the more different things her horses are familiar with will make it easier when they're out and about. She's more horse crazy than I am paddle crazy so it's best to just give her what she wants. Anyway I think she was half kidding but I'm not sure.

                  Here is the direction I'm going (I think):

                  I'll use a narrower outwale. It makes sense since I'm used to the tumblehome on my Prism (it's significantly more than the Huron Cruiser).

                  I'll use a scuppered inwale to reduce weight and provide tiedown locations. It's also a place for the water to escape instead of running down my arms when I portage. I intend to leave drain holes in the bow and stern as well.

                  I'll assemble the gunwales with fasteners, before cutting the scuppers while I locate and attach the seats and the thwarts. I'll then remove the inwales and use a 1/2" ball end mill in a router to cut the scuppers, dodging the various mounting holes.

                  I'll finally reassemble the gunwales with fasteners and glue.

                  This plan may change. Any comments?

                  My family (25 relatives) will be over for Easter and they've all heard about my strip canoe project. THe outer hull is complete including the final sanding prep for the varnish. I'm temped to get a can of spar varnish and give the outer hull a coat so I can show it off.

                  Newbie Steve
                • James D. Marco
                  Sounds good to me. There are hundreds of different ways to do it. All of them are correct as long as the boat floats. Keep the wife happy, she will be the
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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                    Sounds good to me. There are hundreds of different ways to do it. All of them
                    are correct as long as the boat floats. Keep the wife happy, she will be the
                    other propeller in the canoe...sometimes anyway....
                    Enjoy your work!
                    jdm
                    At 03:56 PM 4/1/2010, you wrote:
                    >Thanks for the input on my gunwale questions. I do have instructions from Bear Mountain Boats that were sent along with the plans. I forgot what they said about gunwales because frankly I've read so much other stuff as well. I'll have to go back and read the instructions.
                    >
                    >As for the horse jump, my wife's arena is full of proper jumps, barrels, trotting poles, tarps, and whatever else. I think she figures that the more different things her horses are familiar with will make it easier when they're out and about. She's more horse crazy than I am paddle crazy so it's best to just give her what she wants. Anyway I think she was half kidding but I'm not sure.
                    >
                    >Here is the direction I'm going (I think):
                    >
                    >I'll use a narrower outwale. It makes sense since I'm used to the tumblehome on my Prism (it's significantly more than the Huron Cruiser).
                    >
                    >I'll use a scuppered inwale to reduce weight and provide tiedown locations. It's also a place for the water to escape instead of running down my arms when I portage. I intend to leave drain holes in the bow and stern as well.
                    >
                    >I'll assemble the gunwales with fasteners, before cutting the scuppers while I locate and attach the seats and the thwarts. I'll then remove the inwales and use a 1/2" ball end mill in a router to cut the scuppers, dodging the various mounting holes.
                    >
                    >I'll finally reassemble the gunwales with fasteners and glue.
                    >
                    >This plan may change. Any comments?
                    >
                    >My family (25 relatives) will be over for Easter and they've all heard about my strip canoe project. THe outer hull is complete including the final sanding prep for the varnish. I'm temped to get a can of spar varnish and give the outer hull a coat so I can show it off.
                    >
                    >Newbie Steve
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >------------------------------------
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
                    Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
                    B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
                    Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Tim
                    Steve- All sounds good, the only thing I question is using both glue & screws- seems like belt & suspenders. Glue is strong enough and is best if you are
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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                      Steve-

                      All sounds good, the only thing I question is using both glue & screws- seems like belt & suspenders. Glue is strong enough and is best if you are generally careful with your equipment and you use robust materials to not need replacement for a long time. If you view the gunwales as disposable, then just screw them.

                      Good to hear about the project, glad it's going well.

                      Tim Greiner

                      --- Steve wrote:
                      >
                      > Thanks for the input on my gunwale questions. I do have instructions from Bear Mountain Boats that were sent along with the plans. I forgot what they said about gunwales because frankly I've read so much other stuff as well. I'll have to go back and read the instructions.
                      >
                      > As for the horse jump, my wife's arena is full of proper jumps, barrels, trotting poles, tarps, and whatever else. I think she figures that the more different things her horses are familiar with will make it easier when they're out and about. She's more horse crazy than I am paddle crazy so it's best to just give her what she wants. Anyway I think she was half kidding but I'm not sure.
                      >
                      > Here is the direction I'm going (I think):
                      >
                      > I'll use a narrower outwale. It makes sense since I'm used to the tumblehome on my Prism (it's significantly more than the Huron Cruiser).
                      >
                      > I'll use a scuppered inwale to reduce weight and provide tiedown locations. It's also a place for the water to escape instead of running down my arms when I portage. I intend to leave drain holes in the bow and stern as well.
                      >
                      > I'll assemble the gunwales with fasteners, before cutting the scuppers while I locate and attach the seats and the thwarts. I'll then remove the inwales and use a 1/2" ball end mill in a router to cut the scuppers, dodging the various mounting holes.
                      >
                      > I'll finally reassemble the gunwales with fasteners and glue.
                      >
                      > This plan may change. Any comments?
                      >
                      > My family (25 relatives) will be over for Easter and they've all heard about my strip canoe project. THe outer hull is complete including the final sanding prep for the varnish. I'm temped to get a can of spar varnish and give the outer hull a coat so I can show it off.
                      >
                      > Newbie Steve
                      >
                    • Steve Taylor
                      Hi guys! Steve was giggling about the comments on the wife s (that would be me) horse jump/strongback thingy. I like the quote below best keep the wife
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 2, 2010
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                        Hi guys!

                        Steve was giggling about the comments on the wife's (that would be me) horse jump/strongback thingy. I like the quote below best "keep the wife happy". I am all for that. Actually, I would like to take the legs off, so that it is on the ground (or just above) and then there would be more things to do with it. I did jump large, solid objects in my younger years and, as I am now suffering from the long term effects of unplanned dismounts (the horse version of "wet exits" I no longer go crashing over jumps. I also liked the suggestion that Steve make me more and safer obstacles. Yes! and furniture for our rather bare home. Alas, he is obsessed with canoe building and we may never have furniture :-(

                        The canoe is very beautiful, though.

                        What do the rest of you do with the strongback when you are finished with them?

                        Penny (The Wife)





                        Sounds good to me. There are hundreds of different ways to do it. All of them
                        are correct as long as the boat floats. Keep the wife happy, she will be the
                        other propeller in the canoe...sometimes anyway....
                        Enjoy your work!
                        jdm
                        At 03:56 PM 4/1/2010, you wrote:





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Tim
                        Penny- My strongback is taken apart (3 pieces 8 , 4 , 4 & legs) and stored in the garage. I live up in Oregon so leaving it outside would soon see it mushroom
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 2, 2010
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                          Penny-

                          My strongback is taken apart (3 pieces 8', 4', 4' & legs) and stored in the garage. I live up in Oregon so leaving it outside would soon see it mushroom food;-( The using-it-as-a-jump would make me nervous if I was doing the jumping, I thought those things were lighter so the horse could kick them down easier.

                          Steve hasn't told you what an excellent coffee table a cedar strip canoe makes? Shame on him. Most wives object to the jumping over it to get to the VCR, but you have already admitted that that would be fun for you. As soon as I build a couple wannigans (see post 4186) I will send him the plans, two sets of legs and they're either end tables or stools/chairs. Furniture problem solved!

                          Tim Greiner

                          --- Penny wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi guys!
                          >
                          > Steve was giggling about the comments on the wife's (that would be me) horse jump/strongback thingy. I like the quote below best "keep the wife happy". I am all for that. Actually, I would like to take the legs off, so that it is on the ground (or just above) and then there would be more things to do with it. I did jump large, solid objects in my younger years and, as I am now suffering from the long term effects of unplanned dismounts (the horse version of "wet exits" I no longer go crashing over jumps. I also liked the suggestion that Steve make me more and safer obstacles. Yes! and furniture for our rather bare home. Alas, he is obsessed with canoe building and we may never have furniture :-(
                          >
                          > The canoe is very beautiful, though.
                          >
                          > What do the rest of you do with the strongback when you are finished with them?
                          >
                          > Penny (The Wife)
                          >
                          >
                          > Sounds good to me. There are hundreds of different ways to do it. All of them
                          > are correct as long as the boat floats. Keep the wife happy, she will be the
                          > other propeller in the canoe...sometimes anyway....
                          > Enjoy your work!
                          > jdm
                          >
                        • James D. Marco
                          Hi Penny, There are several versions of canoe furniture. Small canoes made into coffee tables, canoe bookshelves, canoe seats, well, lots of stuff. At least
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 2, 2010
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                            Hi Penny,
                            There are several versions of canoe furniture.
                            Small canoes made into coffee tables, canoe bookshelves,
                            canoe seats, well, lots of stuff. At least you have no worries
                            about wet exits.
                            I don't use a strong back, per sait. I use my work bench
                            and a piece hung off it. Though, I have helped a couple people
                            build theirs. Sorry, no help there. When I am done it is just the
                            stations and plywood. Generally I reuse the plywood for odds
                            and ends, keeping the stations.
                            Yes, I well know procrastination. I got mad when I put
                            two holes in the wrong spot in a drawer front on a cherry Queen
                            Ann Highboy. I didn't work on it for 4 years....still a little upset.
                            I had the template backwards....bloody thing....another story....
                            Anyway, canoes make OK furniture, but, I am really not sure
                            if you want the whole house decked out in them. It is certainly
                            possible, though. Be happy! Steve will do his best ...
                            My thoughts only . . .
                            jdm

                            At 10:30 AM 4/2/2010, you wrote:
                            >Hi guys!
                            >
                            >Steve was giggling about the comments on the wife's (that would be me) horse jump/strongback thingy. I like the quote below best "keep the wife happy". I am all for that. Actually, I would like to take the legs off, so that it is on the ground (or just above) and then there would be more things to do with it. I did jump large, solid objects in my younger years and, as I am now suffering from the long term effects of unplanned dismounts (the horse version of "wet exits" I no longer go crashing over jumps. I also liked the suggestion that Steve make me more and safer obstacles. Yes! and furniture for our rather bare home. Alas, he is obsessed with canoe building and we may never have furniture :-(
                            >
                            >The canoe is very beautiful, though.
                            >
                            >What do the rest of you do with the strongback when you are finished with them?
                            >
                            >Penny (The Wife)
                          • Steve Taylor
                            hhhmmmm... canoe bookshelves would be very nice. May be not the whole house, but a couple would be pretty. Great idea! Thanks, Penny ... From: James D.
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 3, 2010
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                              hhhmmmm... canoe bookshelves would be very nice. May be not the whole house, but a couple would be pretty. Great idea!

                              Thanks, Penny


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: James D. Marco
                              To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, April 02, 2010 12:06 PM
                              Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Gunwales Questions



                              Hi Penny,
                              There are several versions of canoe furniture.
                              Small canoes made into coffee tables, canoe bookshelves,
                              canoe seats, well, lots of stuff. At least you have no worries
                              about wet exits.
                              I don't use a strong back, per sait. I use my work bench
                              and a piece hung off it. Though, I have helped a couple people
                              build theirs. Sorry, no help there. When I am done it is just the
                              stations and plywood. Generally I reuse the plywood for odds
                              and ends, keeping the stations.
                              Yes, I well know procrastination. I got mad when I put
                              two holes in the wrong spot in a drawer front on a cherry Queen
                              Ann Highboy. I didn't work on it for 4 years....still a little upset.
                              I had the template backwards....bloody thing....another story....
                              Anyway, canoes make OK furniture, but, I am really not sure
                              if you want the whole house decked out in them. It is certainly
                              possible, though. Be happy! Steve will do his best ...
                              My thoughts only . . .
                              jdm

                              At 10:30 AM 4/2/2010, you wrote:
                              >Hi guys!
                              >
                              >Steve was giggling about the comments on the wife's (that would be me) horse jump/strongback thingy. I like the quote below best "keep the wife happy". I am all for that. Actually, I would like to take the legs off, so that it is on the ground (or just above) and then there would be more things to do with it. I did jump large, solid objects in my younger years and, as I am now suffering from the long term effects of unplanned dismounts (the horse version of "wet exits" I no longer go crashing over jumps. I also liked the suggestion that Steve make me more and safer obstacles. Yes! and furniture for our rather bare home. Alas, he is obsessed with canoe building and we may never have furniture :-(
                              >
                              >The canoe is very beautiful, though.
                              >
                              >What do the rest of you do with the strongback when you are finished with them?
                              >
                              >Penny (The Wife)





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Steve Taylor
                              Yes! we need a coffee table and the cedar strips look so beautiful. Please send plans! If I can t jump em I can always go around. Some jumps are meant to
                              Message 14 of 14 , Apr 3, 2010
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Yes! we need a coffee table and the cedar strips look so beautiful. Please send plans! If I can't jump 'em I can always go around.

                                Some jumps are meant to come apart if the horse hits them, others - not. The cross country jumps are generally solid (as seen in the Olympics) but the jumps in the arena are meant to come apart. The powers that be are considering requiring that all jumps come apart (due to the obvious danger, the jumps are BIG) but horsey people are often resistant to change and they ain't no sissies, so who knows how long that will take.

                                Penny






                                Penny-

                                My strongback is taken apart (3 pieces 8', 4', 4' & legs) and stored in the garage. I live up in Oregon so leaving it outside would soon see it mushroom food;-( The using-it-as-a-jump would make me nervous if I was doing the jumping, I thought those things were lighter so the horse could kick them down easier.

                                Steve hasn't told you what an excellent coffee table a cedar strip canoe makes? Shame on him. Most wives object to the jumping over it to get to the VCR, but you have already admitted that that would be fun for you. As soon as I build a couple wannigans (see post 4186) I will send him the plans, two sets of legs and they're either end tables or stools/chairs. Furniture problem solved!

                                Tim Greiner

                                --- Penny wrote:
                                >
                                > Hi guys!
                                >
                                > Steve was giggling about the comments on the wife's (that would be me) horse jump/strongback thingy. I like the quote below best "keep the wife happy". I am all for that. Actually, I would like to take the legs off, so that it is on the ground (or just above) and then there would be more things to do with it. I did jump large, solid objects in my younger years and, as I am now suffering from the long term effects of unplanned dismounts (the horse version of "wet exits" I no longer go crashing over jumps. I also liked the suggestion that Steve make me more and safer obstacles. Yes! and furniture for our rather bare home. Alas, he is obsessed with canoe building and we may never have furniture :-(
                                >
                                > The canoe is very beautiful, though.
                                >
                                > What do the rest of you do with the strongback when you are finished with them?
                                >
                                > Penny (The Wife)
                                >

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