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Re: Huron Cruiser mid project report

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  • drippy70
    Update... I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We re going to epoxy and glass the hull tomorrow. I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2 tungsten carbide
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 5 9:04 AM
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      Update...

      I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass the hull tomorrow.

      I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80 grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it didn't take that long.

      I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo filling.

      I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.

      Thanks.

      Newbie Steve
    • James D. Marco
      Hi Steve, Sounds good. The stains will probably cover with the glass. Cedar is easy to work with. Any dents can be wetted, then sanded over...most of the dent
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 5 9:56 AM
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        Hi Steve,
        Sounds good. The stains will probably cover with the glass.
        Cedar is easy to work with. Any dents can be wetted, then sanded
        over...most of the dent will come out. Enough to glass over with no
        problems, usually. You will want an extra pair of hands with the
        glassing.
        Good Luck!
        jdm
        At 12:04 PM 3/5/2010, you wrote:
        >Update...
        >
        >I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass the hull tomorrow.
        >
        >I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80 grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it didn't take that long.
        >
        >I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo filling.
        >
        >I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.
        >
        >Thanks.
        >
        >Newbie Steve
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
        Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
        B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
        Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gary Jackson
        You could also try wetting the dent and then using a damp rag and an iron. The heat from the iron and the moisture may well raise the dent. Gary
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 5 10:05 AM
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          You could also try wetting the dent and then using a damp rag and an iron. The heat from the iron and the moisture may well raise the dent.

          Gary

          ________________________________
          From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James D. Marco
          Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 9:56 AM
          To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Huron Cruiser mid project report



          Hi Steve,
          Sounds good. The stains will probably cover with the glass.
          Cedar is easy to work with. Any dents can be wetted, then sanded
          over...most of the dent will come out. Enough to glass over with no
          problems, usually. You will want an extra pair of hands with the
          glassing.
          Good Luck!
          jdm
          At 12:04 PM 3/5/2010, you wrote:
          >Update...
          >
          >I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass the hull tomorrow.
          >
          >I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80 grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it didn't take that long.
          >
          >I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo filling.
          >
          >I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.
          >
          >Thanks.
          >
          >Newbie Steve
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
          Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
          B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
          Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


          ________________________________
          If this email is spam, report it here:
          http://www.OnlyMyEmail.com/ReportSpam<http://www.onlymyemail.com/view/?action=reportSpam&Id=MTAxOTMyOjEwNTQyODI1NzA6Z2phY2tzb25AamVpLWNzLmNvbTpkZWxldGVk>


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • James D. Marco
          Good thought, Gary! jdm ... James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 5 11:36 AM
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            Good thought, Gary!
            jdm
            At 01:05 PM 3/5/2010, you wrote:
            >You could also try wetting the dent and then using a damp rag and an iron. The heat from the iron and the moisture may well raise the dent.
            >
            >Gary
            >
            >________________________________
            >From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James D. Marco
            >Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 9:56 AM
            >To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Huron Cruiser mid project report
            >
            >
            >
            >Hi Steve,
            >Sounds good. The stains will probably cover with the glass.
            >Cedar is easy to work with. Any dents can be wetted, then sanded
            >over...most of the dent will come out. Enough to glass over with no
            >problems, usually. You will want an extra pair of hands with the
            >glassing.
            >Good Luck!
            >jdm
            >At 12:04 PM 3/5/2010, you wrote:
            >>Update...
            >>
            >>I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass the hull tomorrow.
            >>
            >>I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80 grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it didn't take that long.
            >>
            >>I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo filling.
            >>
            >>I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.
            >>
            >>Thanks.
            >>
            >>Newbie Steve
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>------------------------------------
            >>
            >>Yahoo! Groups Links
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
            >Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
            >B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
            >Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >________________________________
            >If this email is spam, report it here:
            >http://www.OnlyMyEmail.com/ReportSpam<http://www.onlymyemail.com/view/?action=reportSpam&Id=MTAxOTMyOjEwNTQyODI1NzA6Z2phY2tzb25AamVpLWNzLmNvbTpkZWxldGVk>
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >------------------------------------
            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
            Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
            B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
            Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • drippy70
            Thanks for the input Marc and Gary. I haven t done anything with the few dents left in the hull. My stapler probably set staples too deep for optimum finish
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 5 11:42 AM
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              Thanks for the input Marc and Gary. I haven't done anything with the few dents left in the hull. My stapler probably set staples too deep for optimum finish appearance but I was able to use all full length strips until the football and so I guess I'll live with extra staple tracks left in the hull.

              I've struggled with the artisan approach to canoe building from the outset. I certainly can see how you can get caught up in perfection related to finish appearance...but I guess that's another subject. My second boat will look better than my first but for now I can't wait to see how my build looks under glass and how my design mods perform.

              I'm a little unsure how the fabric will lay over the stems but I read that you should slit and overlap where wrinkles are about to form. Also, how many of the three planned coats of epoxy will we be able to apply in one day? I read that you don't have to necessarily sand between coats. I plan to heat and keep my shop at about 70 degrees throughout the day.

              Newbie Steve
            • drippy70
              Sorry, I meant James not Marc.
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 5 11:43 AM
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                Sorry, I meant James not Marc.

                --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "drippy70" <hodtay@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks for the input Marc and Gary. I haven't done anything with the few dents left in the hull. My stapler probably set staples too deep for optimum finish appearance but I was able to use all full length strips until the football and so I guess I'll live with extra staple tracks left in the hull.
                >
                > I've struggled with the artisan approach to canoe building from the outset. I certainly can see how you can get caught up in perfection related to finish appearance...but I guess that's another subject. My second boat will look better than my first but for now I can't wait to see how my build looks under glass and how my design mods perform.
                >
                > I'm a little unsure how the fabric will lay over the stems but I read that you should slit and overlap where wrinkles are about to form. Also, how many of the three planned coats of epoxy will we be able to apply in one day? I read that you don't have to necessarily sand between coats. I plan to heat and keep my shop at about 70 degrees throughout the day.
                >
                > Newbie Steve
                >
              • James D. Marco
                Yeah, at the curves, sometimes you have to cut a small V out. A lot will depend on the cloth you choose. With some heavy applicator trowling, it is possible
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 5 12:30 PM
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                  Yeah, at the curves, sometimes you have to cut a small "V" out. A lot will
                  depend on the cloth you choose. With some heavy applicator trowling, it
                  is possible to move the fibers around a bit. Lighter cloth moves more than
                  denser cloth. One batch I got was quite loose, the other was thinner
                  individual threads, but but more densely woven. Hard to say without trying
                  a piece. Like I say, it will take some fussing, soo, another person will help.
                  A sharp set of shears (smaller ones, ~7") works well, but keep a bucket
                  of acetone/paint thinner handy...about a 50/50 mix. This will let you clean
                  off after a couple cuts. Squeeze the top closed, to keep the stuff from
                  evaporating too quick. A few rags will help to wipe them down, too. Some
                  people say a razor knife works well, but this seems to pull fibers out of the
                  cloth more than a scissors. Overlapping is OK. A power sander can grind
                  off the excess glass later. It is hard on sand paper, though.
                  You should lay all the epoxy on in one day. If it totally hardens, then you
                  should sand it before putting on another coat. If it is still "green" (ie, fairly
                  firm, hard but not cured) it will chemically bond with a new coat. If you wait 24
                  hours, you will have to sand it...this makes a mechanical bond...OK for a most
                  stuff, but for filling a weave, you really want a chemical bond. This will depend
                  on the manufacturer, the type of hardener, and the temperature the epoxy is
                  at. One trick, keep the epoxy in the 'fridge. Mix it cold, and, then spread it out
                  ASAP. DO NOT, leave it in a bucket. It will heat up and set very fast. Mix smaller
                  batches...maybe a pint at a time. Have several trays handy. Don't mix older stuff
                  with fresh mixed stuff...it will harden too fast. I would recommend three buckets
                  and three trays at a minimum.
                  70F sounds a bit too warm. I would go with the minimum that the
                  manufacturer recommends for temp range. This will give you the most amount
                  of time to work. If you have to stop, scissor the glass off before wetting. Then lay
                  out what you have. A 6" lap will only add a couple ounces to clean it later on.
                  If it stiffens before it is down, you are in trouble.Tear it off before the epoxy sets
                  too hard, cutting back as clean as possible. You will need to let it harden and lap
                  it, later on. Sanding it clean after hardening, of course. Then continue.
                  DO NOT use a kerosene or unvented propane heater. This will add a
                  lot of moisture to the air. At about 70% humidity, the epoxy will "blush" or turn
                  a bit milky. Not what you want, I am sure.
                  My thoughts only . . .
                  jdm
                  At 02:42 PM 3/5/2010, you wrote:
                  >Thanks for the input Marc and Gary. I haven't done anything with the few dents left in the hull. My stapler probably set staples too deep for optimum finish appearance but I was able to use all full length strips until the football and so I guess I'll live with extra staple tracks left in the hull.
                  >
                  >I've struggled with the artisan approach to canoe building from the outset. I certainly can see how you can get caught up in perfection related to finish appearance...but I guess that's another subject. My second boat will look better than my first but for now I can't wait to see how my build looks under glass and how my design mods perform.
                  >
                  >I'm a little unsure how the fabric will lay over the stems but I read that you should slit and overlap where wrinkles are about to form. Also, how many of the three planned coats of epoxy will we be able to apply in one day? I read that you don't have to necessarily sand between coats. I plan to heat and keep my shop at about 70 degrees throughout the day.
                  >
                  >Newbie Steve
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >------------------------------------
                  >
                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  James Marco, Computer Operations Manager & Desktop Support
                  Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and, Biomedical Engineering Departments
                  B59 Olin Hall, Cornell University
                  Ithaca, NY 14853 Office Phone: 607-255-7312


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Charles & Dana Scott
                  Newbie Steve, if the errors you mention are obvious now, they will be obvious when you apply the epoxy and fiberglass. The fiberglass becomes a pane of glass,
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 5 1:22 PM
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                    Newbie Steve, if the errors you mention are obvious now, they will be
                    obvious when you apply the epoxy and fiberglass. The fiberglass becomes a
                    pane of glass, once the epoxy is applied, to the hull. So what you see now,
                    is what you will see when you apply fiberglass and epoxy.



                    If these blemishes bother you, you need to deal with them now, before you
                    apply the epoxy and resin.



                    In terms of fairing the hull, the color of the hull doesn't matter. It's
                    the smoothness of the hull that gets you the glide through the water. But
                    everyone looks at your effort while you drive up and put it in the water,
                    just remember that.



                    If there is the opportunity to make the hull the way you want it to look
                    now, before you enclose it in fiberglass and epoxy, in other words make it
                    the way you want it, now is the time.



                    Corky Scott



                    _____

                    From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of drippy70
                    Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 12:04 PM
                    To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Huron Cruiser mid project report





                    Update...

                    I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass
                    the hull tomorrow.

                    I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great
                    to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80
                    grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it
                    didn't take that long.

                    I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It
                    worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will
                    disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove
                    those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe
                    the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known
                    the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo
                    filling.

                    I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of
                    fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final
                    blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The
                    stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.

                    Thanks.

                    Newbie Steve





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • drippy70
                    Thanks for the advice. I m actually proud of how the hull looks but never satified (grin). I filled the few areas I thought might remain after three coats of
                    Message 9 of 14 , Mar 5 2:21 PM
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                      Thanks for the advice. I'm actually proud of how the hull looks but never satified (grin). I filled the few areas I thought might remain after three coats of epoxy and of course never having epoxied a canoe with clear before I don't know what will be visible in the end. Dad is coming to help with the fiberglass and I think I mentioned he owned and operated a fiberglassing business in the 50s He might say to stop and do some more work on the hull before we start. My plan is to hit the hull quickly with 80 grit on the longboard sander to take out the 40 grit scratches I think might show through, wipe it down with an acetoned dampened rag and then epoxy. Some staple tracks still remain but the hull is smooth.

                      I'll post some photos after tomorrow's session.

                      --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Charles & Dana Scott" <charles.k.scott@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Newbie Steve, if the errors you mention are obvious now, they will be
                      > obvious when you apply the epoxy and fiberglass. The fiberglass becomes a
                      > pane of glass, once the epoxy is applied, to the hull. So what you see now,
                      > is what you will see when you apply fiberglass and epoxy.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > If these blemishes bother you, you need to deal with them now, before you
                      > apply the epoxy and resin.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > In terms of fairing the hull, the color of the hull doesn't matter. It's
                      > the smoothness of the hull that gets you the glide through the water. But
                      > everyone looks at your effort while you drive up and put it in the water,
                      > just remember that.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > If there is the opportunity to make the hull the way you want it to look
                      > now, before you enclose it in fiberglass and epoxy, in other words make it
                      > the way you want it, now is the time.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Corky Scott
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                      > [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of drippy70
                      > Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 12:04 PM
                      > To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Huron Cruiser mid project report
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Update...
                      >
                      > I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass
                      > the hull tomorrow.
                      >
                      > I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great
                      > to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80
                      > grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it
                      > didn't take that long.
                      >
                      > I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It
                      > worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will
                      > disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove
                      > those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe
                      > the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known
                      > the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo
                      > filling.
                      >
                      > I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of
                      > fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final
                      > blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The
                      > stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.
                      >
                      > Thanks.
                      >
                      > Newbie Steve
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • windward72
                      Congratulations on your first build! You re done with the fun part now comes the messy part. As far as filling in the gaps, it really makes a big difference
                      Message 10 of 14 , Mar 6 2:43 PM
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                        Congratulations on your first build! You're done with the fun part now comes the messy part.

                        As far as filling in the gaps, it really makes a big difference when there are no voids before laying up the glass. It's worth taking the time to do the filets in every possible void, they will turn into problematic bubbles when laying up the glass. Even after I filled and faired the hull I was still chasing bubbles for 2 hours while the slow kick epoxy cured.

                        I like the "no outer stem" look. It's a good idea to lay up a strip about 4" wide on the stems and along the keel line to give it added strength and stiffness. It's better to over engineer in this area especially without an outer stem than fix a weakness later. I also like to use a hefty filet on the inner stem and lay up another strip of glass on the inside for added strength. It can get a little ugly in the tight spot though. I decked mine and installed a water tight bulkhead for bouyancy (I fully expect to fall out of it at some point) so I didn't care how it looked.

                        If you're anything like me, you'll find that paddling a boat you have built yourself is one of the most rewarding things ever. Although, sometimes it is a bit of a hassle when 10 people stop you on the way to the water to ask you about it every time you go out. but then again who doesn't like to talk at length about the 300 hours you just spent building your boat?

                        Cheers!

                        Casey
                        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "drippy70" <hodtay@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Update...
                        >
                        > I finished stripping and fairing the hull. We're going to epoxy and glass the hull tomorrow.
                        >
                        > I found a nice Hyde brand 2-1/2" tungsten carbide scraper that worked great to fare the hull. Between the scraper and my longboard sander with 40 and 80 grit paper I faired the hull without the use of any power tools and it didn't take that long.
                        >
                        > I tried the exopy, filler and wood dust method of filling a few boo-boos. It worked okay but it left dark areas around the fills that I hope will disappear when I epoxy the hull. I didn't want to sand deep enough to remove those stains. I think I'll try a water based wood filler next time. Maybe the boo-boos weren't really bad enough to warrent filling and had I known the stains would be so difficult to remove I would have forgone the boo-boo filling.
                        >
                        > I plan a single layer of e-glass on the outer hull with two extra layers of fabric on the stems (strips cut on the bias and applied before the final blanket of fabric is applied). Any suggestions or comments on this plan? The stems have no outer stems and the leading edge is about a 3/8" round-over.
                        >
                        > Thanks.
                        >
                        > Newbie Steve
                        >
                      • James D. Marco
                        Steve, How did you make out with fiberglass? Good I hope. jdm
                        Message 11 of 14 , Mar 8 1:16 AM
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                          Steve,
                          How did you make out with fiberglass? Good I hope.
                          jdm
                        • Steve Taylor
                          I m very happy with how the HC outer hull turned out. The blemishes and imperfections seem to add charactor and they are all mistakes I can eliminate next
                          Message 12 of 14 , Mar 8 7:10 AM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I'm very happy with how the HC outer hull turned out. The blemishes and
                            imperfections seem to add charactor and they are all mistakes I can
                            eliminate next time.

                            Dad, who came over to help was really worried about the set time of the
                            epoxy and had us mixing small batches and rushing a little. Once we saw how
                            long the pot life was we took a more leisurely pace.

                            The West System epoxy works great and it was easy to follow the application
                            steps listed in all the stuff I've read. We laid the fiberglass blanket
                            over the hull and I cut it to fit. From the crop I cut pieces to clad the
                            stems. We pulled the blanket back from the stems and epoxied the strips.
                            Each stem got two layers of fiberglass before the blanket was pulled back
                            over and epoxied down. The wear points on the stems have a total of three
                            layers of glass. You can see a little cloudiness in the three layer build
                            up. We were rushing and we had a little trouble folding the glass over the
                            leading edge. The stems are strong and during the final sanding before the
                            varnish I'll do a little dressing up of that area.

                            Dad and my nephew applied the first two coats of epoxy while I mixed the
                            batches of epoxy and worked the squeegee. After everyone left and the
                            second coat set a little I applied the third coat myself. It was fun to put
                            on that coat alone and privately watch the hull come to life. I know it's
                            easy to be over-critical about the imperfections but the stems don't really
                            look so bad and they are certainly strong.

                            The hull looks rich and strong and somehow the way the western red cedar
                            darkened makes it look really cool. I'm glad I'm doing this project!!!

                            Anyway, thanks for your interest. I'll post photos tonight after work.

                            Newbie Steve


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: James D. Marco
                            To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, March 08, 2010 1:16 AM
                            Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Huron Cruiser mid project report



                            Steve,
                            How did you make out with fiberglass? Good I hope.
                            jdm
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