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Re: RE: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Newbie with lots of questions

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  • hodtay@hughes.net
    Thanks for the response. I ve ordered Susan Van Leuven s book and I should be getting it any day. The grain orientation you describe makes sense. I think I
    Message 1 of 62 , Jan 26, 2010
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      Thanks for the response.

      I've ordered Susan Van Leuven's book and I should be getting it any day. The grain orientation you describe makes sense. I think I can avoid the planer step if do a good job setting up my table saw to rip the strips.

      The biggest problem I'll have is getting the 18' long planks home. I have until Saturday to figure it out.

      Do you cove and groove your stock?

      Steve


      On Jan 26, 2010, Charles & Dana Scott <charles.k.scott@...> wrote:

        You can use almost any thickness of cedar stock to begin ripping your
      strips, but having planks that are the correct length is a LOT of help. It
      means you do not have to scarf them together to make the length you need to
      cover the entire length of the hull. So if your canoe is to be 16 feet, see
      if you can find planks that are 17 feet. If not, you will have to scarf
      them together at some point during the covering process.

      If you have 2x4 or 2x6 stock, you need to rip it down to ¾” before you begin
      ripping the strips. Susan Van Leuven suggests that you look at the plank
      and cut off sub planks such that they are ¾” thick, then rip them at ¼” or
      slightly thicker, if you have a plane you can then use to get them down to
      the pre-requisite ¼” thickness. She further suggests that you rip off your
      sub planks such that when you rip your strips, the grain is vertical, like
      this:

      _
      _
      _
      _
      _

      She said that if you rip the strips such that the rings are oriented the
      other way, like this:

      ____________

      ____________

      ____________

      When the strips have their grain oriented like the second example, it
      increases the possibility of splitting when the strip is bent sharply.

      I’ve been ripping strips myself and had a 16ft 2x6 cedar plank for material.
      I checked the grain and determined how to mill it and… set it up wrong.

      So I went ahead and milled all the sub planks at 1”, and went ahead and
      ripped all the strips from the sub planks. It worked out ok, each sub plank
      rendered six strips, if I’m remembering correctly.

      So for those of you who are wondering, yes, I’m making my strips 1 inch
      tall, rather than ¾”. The canoe design I’m building doesn’t have any
      dramatic curves in it so I think I’ll be fine with the 1” height strips.

      Corky Scott

      _____

      From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of drippy70
      Sent: Tuesday, January 26, 2010 2:57 PM
      To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Newbie with lots of questions

      More newbie questions...

      I've located a local lumber company that stocks randem lengths of kiln dried
      red western cedar. Over the phone it sounds like they have the stock I need
      to make strips. Any advice on how to go about selecting "two by" stock for
      milling in my shop? Should I not be milling my own stock?

      I don't have a router table but I have a Unisaw Delta table saw. Does
      anybody cove and groove strips on a table saw?

      Another question, is redwood or alder wood suitable for strip building?

      Gil Gilpatrick's canoe strip building book arrived yesterday and I stayed up
      half the night reading it. Good stuff learned.

      I'm hoping to start stripping building on Superbowl Sunday.

      Steve

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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    • dcarm1@comcast.net
      In 1989 I wanted buy a canoe. A friend told me about David Hazen s book The Strippers Guide to Canoe Building . I ran out and bought a copy and 2 months later
      Message 62 of 62 , Jan 20, 2010
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        In 1989 I wanted buy a canoe. A friend told me about David Hazen's book The Strippers Guide to Canoe Building . I ran out and bought a copy and 2 months later was paddling my home built cedar stripper 16' Micmac. It was a really fun and rewarding experience and I recommend Hazen's book. He has plans and instructions as well as an interesting personal history.


        --dc




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "drippy70" <hodtay@...>
        To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 9:56:50 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
        Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Newbie with lots of questions






        I want to build a cedar strip canoe. I ordered a boat plan and an instruction book from Northwest Canoe to get an idea of details. I called Northwest Canoe and had a nice visit with a guy who answered a bunch of questions. I already have a great shop for the project and I am an experienced woodworker. Dad owned a fiberglass shop in the 50s where he made boat hulls, race car bodies and camper shells. I plan to team up with him for the epoxy and glass work. What's the best way for me to get started?

        I own and paddle a Wenonah Prism - Tuff-weave, Bell Yellowstone Solo - Royalex and a Wenonah Widerness - Royalex. Now I want a tandem boat that I can also paddle solo so I think I want to build a Bell Northstar hull or something very close. Is that strip canoe design out there or can someone suggest a similarly designed strip plan?

        Is there a California strip canoe builder who offers instruction, help or advice? I live near Stockton, CA.

        More questions to come.

        Steve




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