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  • Jim Fox
    Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement? [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 4, 2009
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      Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement?

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tim
      Jim- I personally have relegated Gorilla glue to very marginal applications on small boats. It gives an ugly joint with the foaming action so for anything I am
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 4, 2009
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        Jim-

        I personally have relegated Gorilla glue to very marginal applications on small boats. It gives an ugly joint with the foaming action so for anything I am going to finish bright, it's Titebond or equal for no-gap joints that will be epoxied over (this means strip to strip). Epoxy for gap filling. Plus Gorilla is only water resistant (read the label) so it can't be wet constantly or it will fail. It is as expensive as epoxy, just faster. Not many joints on an uncovered canoe that Gorilla is good for, but other boats that have lots of hidden joints can use it to advantage.

        I just finished putting woodwork on a fiberglass hull and did use Gorilla on the gunwales as they had a lot of surface area and I don't care about the looks of the boat (it's for knocking about). Also used PL Premium on the decks, will see how that holds up.

        Contact cement would be interesting, but you would still need a clamping system to hold the strip against the station molds. I think any time gained in gluing would be small and extra sanding time would more than cancel it out. Plus any error made while putting the strips together means tearing it off. The carpenter glues allow wiggling things around for awhile if you need alignment.

        Tim Greiner

        --- Jim Fox wrote:
        >
        > Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement?
        >
        >
      • Jim Fox
        Mostly I m just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some speed. I ve been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago decided
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 4, 2009
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          Mostly I'm just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some speed. I've been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago decided Gorilla glue was more trouble than it was worth for furniture at least. I thought contact cement could be used possibly with cove and bead, but it's a one shot deal, I've had pretty good luck cleaning it up with a scraper, but I'm not sure I'd trust it's strength in a situation like this. As for Titebond, best glue out there, but it too is only water resistant label warnings or not. A friend of mine builds surfboards, I'll find out what they use to glue stringers.
          --- On Fri, 12/4/09, Tim <casey51234@...> wrote:


          From: Tim <casey51234@...>
          Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
          To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, December 4, 2009, 4:00 PM


           




          Jim-

          I personally have relegated Gorilla glue to very marginal applications on small boats. It gives an ugly joint with the foaming action so for anything I am going to finish bright, it's Titebond or equal for no-gap joints that will be epoxied over (this means strip to strip). Epoxy for gap filling. Plus Gorilla is only water resistant (read the label) so it can't be wet constantly or it will fail. It is as expensive as epoxy, just faster. Not many joints on an uncovered canoe that Gorilla is good for, but other boats that have lots of hidden joints can use it to advantage.

          I just finished putting woodwork on a fiberglass hull and did use Gorilla on the gunwales as they had a lot of surface area and I don't care about the looks of the boat (it's for knocking about). Also used PL Premium on the decks, will see how that holds up.

          Contact cement would be interesting, but you would still need a clamping system to hold the strip against the station molds. I think any time gained in gluing would be small and extra sanding time would more than cancel it out. Plus any error made while putting the strips together means tearing it off. The carpenter glues allow wiggling things around for awhile if you need alignment.

          Tim Greiner

          --- Jim Fox wrote:
          >
          > Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement?
          >
          >








          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • alan gearhart
          Regular wood glue works best! Watch out for waterproof glues it will leave dark lines. The glue doe s not have to be waterproof. A wet rag on glue up will
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 5, 2009
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            Regular wood glue works best! Watch out for waterproof glues it will leave dark lines. The glue doe's not have to be waterproof. A wet rag on glue up will take care of a lot of scraping. A feather board with 36 grit will do a fast and easy fairing then 80 and 120 on sander. Yes a cabinet scraper is about the only way for those tight curved inside areas. Just be sure to wet the project and check for scratch marks.




            ________________________________
            From: Jim Fox <djamesfox@...>
            To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, December 4, 2009 4:56:50 PM
            Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?



            Mostly I'm just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some speed. I've been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago decided Gorilla glue was more trouble than it was worth for furniture at least. I thought contact cement could be used possibly with cove and bead, but it's a one shot deal, I've had pretty good luck cleaning it up with a scraper, but I'm not sure I'd trust it's strength in a situation like this. As for Titebond, best glue out there, but it too is only water resistant label warnings or not. A friend of mine builds surfboards, I'll find out what they use to glue stringers.
            --- On Fri, 12/4/09, Tim <casey51234@yahoo. com> wrote:

            From: Tim <casey51234@yahoo. com>
            Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
            To: cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Friday, December 4, 2009, 4:00 PM



            Jim-

            I personally have relegated Gorilla glue to very marginal applications on small boats. It gives an ugly joint with the foaming action so for anything I am going to finish bright, it's Titebond or equal for no-gap joints that will be epoxied over (this means strip to strip). Epoxy for gap filling. Plus Gorilla is only water resistant (read the label) so it can't be wet constantly or it will fail. It is as expensive as epoxy, just faster. Not many joints on an uncovered canoe that Gorilla is good for, but other boats that have lots of hidden joints can use it to advantage.

            I just finished putting woodwork on a fiberglass hull and did use Gorilla on the gunwales as they had a lot of surface area and I don't care about the looks of the boat (it's for knocking about). Also used PL Premium on the decks, will see how that holds up.

            Contact cement would be interesting, but you would still need a clamping system to hold the strip against the station molds. I think any time gained in gluing would be small and extra sanding time would more than cancel it out. Plus any error made while putting the strips together means tearing it off. The carpenter glues allow wiggling things around for awhile if you need alignment.

            Tim Greiner

            --- Jim Fox wrote:
            >
            > Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement?
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jim Fox
            Actually I m not a fan of the wet rag method. It forces the glue into the pores and requires deeper sanding. I wait a few hours (again Titebond, not TB2) the
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 5, 2009
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              Actually I'm not a fan of the wet rag method. It forces the glue into the pores and requires deeper sanding. I wait a few hours (again Titebond, not TB2) the glue gets leathery and excess will slide off with a decent chisel.
              What I was looking for in my previous post(s) was a way (a contact type glue) to eliminate both staples and clamping.The opposite example would be when I use hide glue to allow more working time on more complicated projects. There must be some adhesive that would allow a strip to be seated for good (as a staple does) without the wait time involved in clamping.

              --- On Sat, 12/5/09, alan gearhart <finewood58@...> wrote:

              From: alan gearhart <finewood58@...>
              Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
              To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, December 5, 2009, 6:22 AM







               









              Regular wood glue works best! Watch out for waterproof glues it will leave dark lines. The glue doe's not have to be waterproof. A wet rag on glue up will take care of a lot of scraping. A feather board with 36 grit will do a fast and easy fairing then 80 and 120 on sander. Yes a cabinet scraper is about the only way for those tight curved inside areas. Just be sure to wet the project and check for scratch marks.



              ____________ _________ _________ __

              From: Jim Fox <djamesfox@yahoo. com>

              To: cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com

              Sent: Fri, December 4, 2009 4:56:50 PM

              Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?



              Mostly I'm just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some speed. I've been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago decided Gorilla glue was more trouble than it was worth for furniture at least. I thought contact cement could be used possibly with cove and bead, but it's a one shot deal, I've had pretty good luck cleaning it up with a scraper, but I'm not sure I'd trust it's strength in a situation like this. As for Titebond, best glue out there, but it too is only water resistant label warnings or not. A friend of mine builds surfboards, I'll find out what they use to glue stringers.

              --- On Fri, 12/4/09, Tim <casey51234@ yahoo. com> wrote:



              From: Tim <casey51234@ yahoo. com>

              Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?

              To: cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com

              Date: Friday, December 4, 2009, 4:00 PM



              Jim-



              I personally have relegated Gorilla glue to very marginal applications on small boats. It gives an ugly joint with the foaming action so for anything I am going to finish bright, it's Titebond or equal for no-gap joints that will be epoxied over (this means strip to strip). Epoxy for gap filling. Plus Gorilla is only water resistant (read the label) so it can't be wet constantly or it will fail. It is as expensive as epoxy, just faster. Not many joints on an uncovered canoe that Gorilla is good for, but other boats that have lots of hidden joints can use it to advantage.



              I just finished putting woodwork on a fiberglass hull and did use Gorilla on the gunwales as they had a lot of surface area and I don't care about the looks of the boat (it's for knocking about). Also used PL Premium on the decks, will see how that holds up.



              Contact cement would be interesting, but you would still need a clamping system to hold the strip against the station molds. I think any time gained in gluing would be small and extra sanding time would more than cancel it out. Plus any error made while putting the strips together means tearing it off. The carpenter glues allow wiggling things around for awhile if you need alignment.



              Tim Greiner



              --- Jim Fox wrote:

              >

              > Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement?

              >

              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Charles & Dana Scott
              I m thinking that carpenters glue still looks to be the best type to use because it dries fairly quickly, has good strength and can be cleaned up with water.
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 5, 2009
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                I'm thinking that carpenters glue still looks to be the best type to use
                because it dries fairly quickly, has good strength and can be cleaned up
                with water. Almost no other glue has those three characteristics. I really
                don't mind that you have to wait a bit before adding another strip, in
                reality by the time I've glued one strip and then glued the one on the other
                side, the first strip is almost dry enough to apply another strip on top of
                it. Especially if you are cleaning up the squeeze out as you go.



                I suppose contact cement would work, but as has been pointed out, it doesn't
                really have the ability to wiggle around or slide the strip in place like
                carpenters glue, plus you can't clean it up with water. That last bit may
                not be very important if very little squeeze out occurs.



                Corky Scott



                _____

                From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Fox
                Sent: Friday, December 04, 2009 4:57 PM
                To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip
                joints?






                Mostly I'm just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some
                speed. I've been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago
                decided Gorilla glue was more trouble than it was worth for furniture at
                least. I thought contact cement could be used possibly with cove and bead,
                but it's a one shot deal, I've had pretty good luck cleaning it up with a
                scraper, but I'm not sure I'd trust it's strength in a situation like this.
                As for Titebond, best glue out there, but it too is only water resistant
                label warnings or not. A friend of mine builds surfboards, I'll find out
                what they use to glue stringers.
                _,___



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Anthony Spezio
                Corky, I hate to me a Me Too but I have to go along with you on this. I find that  Elmer s Carpenter glue works even better than Titebond 2. I have used a
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 5, 2009
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                  Corky,
                  I hate to me a "Me Too" but I have to go along with you on this. I find that  Elmer's Carpenter glue works even better than Titebond 2. I have used a verity of glues and what I prefer is the Elmer's Probond Professional strength Interior/Exterior Glue. It sets up faster than Titebond or White glue, easy to wipe off with a damp rag and leaves no stain.
                  Arkansas Tony

                  --- On Sat, 12/5/09, Charles & Dana Scott <charles.k.scott@...> wrote:

                  From: Charles & Dana Scott <charles.k.scott@...>
                  Subject: RE: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
                  To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, December 5, 2009, 11:06 AM







                   









                  I'm thinking that carpenters glue still looks to be the best type to use

                  because it dries fairly quickly, has good strength and can be cleaned up

                  with water. Almost no other glue has those three characteristics. I really

                  don't mind that you have to wait a bit before adding another strip, in

                  reality by the time I've glued one strip and then glued the one on the other

                  side, the first strip is almost dry enough to apply another strip on top of

                  it. Especially if you are cleaning up the squeeze out as you go.



                  I suppose contact cement would work, but as has been pointed out, it doesn't

                  really have the ability to wiggle around or slide the strip in place like

                  carpenters glue, plus you can't clean it up with water. That last bit may

                  not be very important if very little squeeze out occurs.



                  Corky Scott



                  _____



                  From: cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com

                  [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Jim Fox

                  Sent: Friday, December 04, 2009 4:57 PM

                  To: cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com

                  Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip

                  joints?



                  Mostly I'm just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some

                  speed. I've been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago

                  decided Gorilla glue was more trouble than it was worth for furniture at

                  least. I thought contact cement could be used possibly with cove and bead,

                  but it's a one shot deal, I've had pretty good luck cleaning it up with a

                  scraper, but I'm not sure I'd trust it's strength in a situation like this.

                  As for Titebond, best glue out there, but it too is only water resistant

                  label warnings or not. A friend of mine builds surfboards, I'll find out

                  what they use to glue stringers.

                  _,___



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Tim
                  Jim- If you are planning to build only one or two canoes, and like most of us have a few hours on evenings and most weekends as free time, then IMHO the Ted
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 5, 2009
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                    Jim-

                    If you are planning to build only one or two canoes, and like most of us have a few hours on evenings and most weekends as free time, then IMHO the Ted Moore system is the best for economy of time/money.
                    He advocates making "C" shaped plywood brackets to clamp to the forms, and wedges to hold the strips in place. I followed this although bolted the brackets to the forms, and made better brackets for rounding the bilge.

                    There are ways, I am sure, to speed the process up- one would be: Make brackets with clamps that attach to the forms with hand toggles (think Vise-grip or Carr-Lane) and gravity activated holding system for the strips. These would have something like a weighted handle and a peg to fit in a hole in the bracket for the pivot. About 4 of these for holding the strip against the form, and 1 to press the strips together, per form per side- about 120 & 30 for doing both sides of a tandem. Plus 30 straight brackets for the sides/bottom, and 30 curved for the bilges. These would be expensive and time-consuming to build, but if you are planning on mass production would be worthwhile.

                    A better cost/benefit effort might be in sanding- specifically in making attachments, etc. for power sanding that is done by hand now. You could figure out a way to power a fairing board, and make a contoured, padded shoe for a linear to use inside the bilge round.

                    Tim Greiner

                    --- Jim Fox wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Mostly I'm just curious about ways to avoid stapling and maintaining some speed. I've been a furnituremaker for the past 25 years or so. Long ago decided Gorilla glue was more trouble than it was worth for furniture at least. I thought contact cement could be used possibly with cove and bead, but it's a one shot deal, I've had pretty good luck cleaning it up with a scraper, but I'm not sure I'd trust it's strength in a situation like this. As for Titebond, best glue out there, but it too is only water resistant label warnings or not. A friend of mine builds surfboards, I'll find out what they use to glue stringers.

                    > --- Tim wrote:
                    >
                    > Jim-
                    >
                    > I personally have relegated Gorilla glue to very marginal applications on small boats. It gives an ugly joint with the foaming action so for anything I am going to finish bright, it's Titebond or equal for no-gap joints that will be epoxied over (this means strip to strip). Epoxy for gap filling. Plus Gorilla is only water resistant (read the label) so it can't be wet constantly or it will fail. It is as expensive as epoxy, just faster. Not many joints on an uncovered canoe that Gorilla is good for, but other boats that have lots of hidden joints can use it to advantage.
                    >
                    > I just finished putting woodwork on a fiberglass hull and did use Gorilla on the gunwales as they had a lot of surface area and I don't care about the looks of the boat (it's for knocking about). Also used PL Premium on the decks, will see how that holds up.
                    >
                    > Contact cement would be interesting, but you would still need a clamping system to hold the strip against the station molds. I think any time gained in gluing would be small and extra sanding time would more than cancel it out. Plus any error made while putting the strips together means tearing it off. The carpenter glues allow wiggling things around for awhile if you need alignment.
                    >
                    > Tim Greiner
                    >
                    > --- Jim Fox wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Has anyone tried either gorilla glue or contact cement?
                    > >
                    >
                  • Kurt Maurer
                    ... type glue) to eliminate both staples and clamping. Would hot melt glue possibly be what you re looking for? Seems to me that we often confuse the issues of
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 6, 2009
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                      Jim Fox sez:
                      > What I was looking for in my previous post(s) was a way (a contact
                      type glue) to eliminate both staples and clamping.

                      Would hot melt glue possibly be what you're looking for?

                      Seems to me that we often confuse the issues of finding alternatives to
                      staples with ensuring good edge-to-edge bonding. Making sure each strip
                      is securely clamped to its neighbor until the glue cures is a really
                      good idea whether staples are being used or not. Getting all the
                      stripwork to remain securely snugged up against all the forms all the
                      time is a trick that staples guarantee no more than other methods; they
                      just win the overall raw speed contest.

                      Whenever I am confronted with a problem that could become a tedious
                      and/or time-consuming affair, I look to see what the professionals do.
                      In the case of strip building, it's hard to top Rob Macks of Laughing
                      Loon for generously helping anybody and everybody who will listen. Some
                      folks object to his know-it-all style, but if you can blow off what you
                      don't like and keep what you do, then you're in for a world of free and
                      valuable advice from a guy who's built hundreds of boats. Go to the link
                      below and scroll down the page 'til you get to the shop tips links:

                      http://www.laughingloon.com/canoe.kayak.html

                      In the meantime, I've come to trust Titebond II, and recommend it. I
                      leave the wet rag out of strip-building for the reasons mentioned. I
                      allow the beads of squeeze-out to harden fully, and then a carbide
                      scraper from Lowe's knocks 'em off easy as pie. Kinda fun in a weird
                      sort of way, actually.

                      --
                      Cheers,
                      Kurt Maurer
                      League City, Texas
                    • Jim Fox
                        I allow the beads of squeeze-out to harden fully, and then a carbide scraper from Lowe s knocks em off easy as pie. Kinda fun in a weird sort of way,
                      Message 10 of 17 , Dec 6, 2009
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                          I allow the beads of squeeze-out to harden fully, and then a carbide

                        scraper from Lowe's knocks 'em off easy as pie. Kinda fun in a weird

                        sort of way, actually.
                        It is fun though try slipping the excess off with a chisel when the glue is leathery. It's fun too. I built my last one wishing I had a clear shot at the inside to do just that!
                        --- On Sun, 12/6/09, Kurt Maurer <NGC704@...> wrote:

                        From: Kurt Maurer <NGC704@...>
                        Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
                        To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Sunday, December 6, 2009, 10:26 AM







                         









                        Jim Fox sez:

                        > What I was looking for in my previous post(s) was a way (a contact

                        type glue) to eliminate both staples and clamping.



                        Would hot melt glue possibly be what you're looking for?



                        Seems to me that we often confuse the issues of finding alternatives to

                        staples with ensuring good edge-to-edge bonding. Making sure each strip

                        is securely clamped to its neighbor until the glue cures is a really

                        good idea whether staples are being used or not. Getting all the

                        stripwork to remain securely snugged up against all the forms all the

                        time is a trick that staples guarantee no more than other methods; they

                        just win the overall raw speed contest.



                        Whenever I am confronted with a problem that could become a tedious

                        and/or time-consuming affair, I look to see what the professionals do.

                        In the case of strip building, it's hard to top Rob Macks of Laughing

                        Loon for generously helping anybody and everybody who will listen. Some

                        folks object to his know-it-all style, but if you can blow off what you

                        don't like and keep what you do, then you're in for a world of free and

                        valuable advice from a guy who's built hundreds of boats. Go to the link

                        below and scroll down the page 'til you get to the shop tips links:



                        http://www.laughing loon.com/ canoe.kayak. html



                        In the meantime, I've come to trust Titebond II, and recommend it. I

                        leave the wet rag out of strip-building for the reasons mentioned. I

                        allow the beads of squeeze-out to harden fully, and then a carbide

                        scraper from Lowe's knocks 'em off easy as pie. Kinda fun in a weird

                        sort of way, actually.



                        --

                        Cheers,

                        Kurt Maurer

                        League City, Texas






















                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Kurt Maurer
                        Jim Fox sez: It is fun though try slipping the excess off with a chisel when the glue is leathery. This must be one of those places where the written word
                        Message 11 of 17 , Dec 7, 2009
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                          Jim Fox sez: "It is fun though try slipping the excess off with a chisel
                          when the glue is leathery."

                          This must be one of those places where the written word can come across
                          a little less clearly than intended. My radar picked up this: using a
                          chisel sounds like a great way to accidentally dig in and do some
                          frustrating damage to the woodwork. But when Jim says it's fun, I can
                          dig it; makes things a lot clearer to me. Tells me it works pretty darn
                          good, and I aim to try it next time.

                          --
                          Cheers,
                          Kurt Maurer
                          League City, Texas
                        • Jim Fox
                          Sharp chisels aren t as inclined to accidentally slip in and gouge; that is usually the result of dull chisels being pushed to hard. Learned that the hard
                          Message 12 of 17 , Dec 7, 2009
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                            Sharp chisels aren't as inclined to accidentally slip in and gouge; that is usually the result of dull chisels being pushed to hard. Learned that the hard way, though I had to repeat the process several times until I assimilated it.

                            --- On Mon, 12/7/09, Kurt Maurer <NGC704@...> wrote:


                            From: Kurt Maurer <NGC704@...>
                            Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
                            To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Monday, December 7, 2009, 10:16 AM


                             



                            Jim Fox sez: "It is fun though try slipping the excess off with a chisel
                            when the glue is leathery."

                            This must be one of those places where the written word can come across
                            a little less clearly than intended. My radar picked up this: using a
                            chisel sounds like a great way to accidentally dig in and do some
                            frustrating damage to the woodwork. But when Jim says it's fun, I can
                            dig it; makes things a lot clearer to me. Tells me it works pretty darn
                            good, and I aim to try it next time.

                            --
                            Cheers,
                            Kurt Maurer
                            League City, Texas








                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Tim
                            Actually, it makes wonderful sense-at least on the outside, especially at the bilge turn. The glue joint is right where you are going to be taking off material
                            Message 13 of 17 , Dec 7, 2009
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                              Actually, it makes wonderful sense-at least on the outside, especially at the bilge turn. The glue joint is right where you are going to be taking off material to fair the hull, so any gouges (if not deep) are a bonus. Inside- not so much, especially at the bilge turn as minimum sanding is at the joint. A scraper might be better there.

                              Tim Greiner

                              --- Kurt Maurer wrote:
                              >
                              > Jim Fox sez: "It is fun though try slipping the excess off with a chisel
                              > when the glue is leathery."
                              >
                              > This must be one of those places where the written word can come across
                              > a little less clearly than intended. My radar picked up this: using a
                              > chisel sounds like a great way to accidentally dig in and do some
                              > frustrating damage to the woodwork. But when Jim says it's fun, I can
                              > dig it; makes things a lot clearer to me. Tells me it works pretty darn
                              > good, and I aim to try it next time.
                              >
                              > --
                              > Cheers,
                              > Kurt Maurer
                              > League City, Texas
                              >
                            • Kurt Maurer
                              Ol Jim and I are just gettin on like a couple of long-lost twins or something. I 100% agree on his sharp tools comment. -- Cheers, Kurt Maurer League City,
                              Message 14 of 17 , Dec 8, 2009
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                                Ol' Jim and I are just gettin' on like a couple of long-lost twins or
                                something. I 100% agree on his sharp tools comment.

                                --
                                Cheers,
                                Kurt Maurer
                                League City, Texas
                              • hdrackal
                                I concur. My 6 year old got told off at school for complaining about the lack of sharp knives to cut fruit in class. They gave her bendy plastic ones.
                                Message 15 of 17 , Dec 9, 2009
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                                  I concur. My 6 year old got told off at school for complaining about the lack of sharp knives to cut fruit in class. They gave her bendy plastic ones. Apparently she was grumbling "how can you expect us to do a proper job if you don't give us proper tools
                                  Hayden

                                  --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, Kurt Maurer <NGC704@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Ol' Jim and I are just gettin' on like a couple of long-lost twins or
                                  > something. I 100% agree on his sharp tools comment.
                                  >
                                  > --
                                  > Cheers,
                                  > Kurt Maurer
                                  > League City, Texas
                                  >
                                • Jim Fox
                                  When my son was around three, he wanted to help me in the shop, so I taught him how to use a chisel to trim off the ends of the dowels I used to pin certain
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Dec 9, 2009
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                                    When my son was around three, he wanted to help me in the shop, so I taught him how to use a chisel to trim off the ends of the dowels I used to pin certain joints. His mother about had a heart attack when he showed her how sharp his tools were. People get hurt most often and do the most damage to wood with dull tools. Sharper is safer all the way around. He's twenty three now and still has all nine fingers.

                                    --- On Wed, 12/9/09, hdrackal <hdrackal@...> wrote:

                                    From: hdrackal <hdrackal@...>
                                    Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
                                    To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Wednesday, December 9, 2009, 6:16 PM







                                     









                                    I concur. My 6 year old got told off at school for complaining about the lack of sharp knives to cut fruit in class. They gave her bendy plastic ones. Apparently she was grumbling "how can you expect us to do a proper job if you don't give us proper tools

                                    Hayden



                                    --- In cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com, Kurt Maurer <NGC704@...> wrote:

                                    >

                                    > Ol' Jim and I are just gettin' on like a couple of long-lost twins or

                                    > something. I 100% agree on his sharp tools comment.

                                    >

                                    > --

                                    > Cheers,

                                    > Kurt Maurer

                                    > League City, Texas

                                    >






















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                                  • gyipee
                                    Hi Nine fingers did he give you one,, I remember doing my woodwork O grade at school and putting the chisel through the wood into my finger and bleeding all
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Dec 10, 2009
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                                      Hi Nine fingers did he give you one,,
                                      I remember doing my woodwork O grade at school and putting the chisel through the wood into my finger and bleeding all over my work I think they took pity on me and passed me, as it was the only pass I got at skool,
                                      Bogsdolics.

                                      --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, Jim Fox <djamesfox@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > When my son was around three, he wanted to help me in the shop, so I taught him how to use a chisel to trim off the ends of the dowels I used to pin certain joints. His mother about had a heart attack when he showed her how sharp his tools were. People get hurt most often and do the most damage to wood with dull tools. Sharper is safer all the way around. He's twenty three now and still has all nine fingers.
                                      >
                                      > --- On Wed, 12/9/09, hdrackal <hdrackal@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > From: hdrackal <hdrackal@...>
                                      > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Gorilla or Contact Cement for strip joints?
                                      > To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Date: Wednesday, December 9, 2009, 6:16 PM
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                                      > I concur. My 6 year old got told off at school for complaining about the lack of sharp knives to cut fruit in class. They gave her bendy plastic ones. Apparently she was grumbling "how can you expect us to do a proper job if you don't give us proper tools
                                      >
                                      > Hayden
                                      >
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                                      >
                                      > --- In cedarstripcanoes@ yahoogroups. com, Kurt Maurer <NGC704@> wrote:
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                                      > > Ol' Jim and I are just gettin' on like a couple of long-lost twins or
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                                      > > something. I 100% agree on his sharp tools comment.
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                                      >
                                      > > --
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                                      > > Cheers,
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                                      > > Kurt Maurer
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                                      > > League City, Texas
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