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Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] I just bought canoe plans( prospector)

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  • jeff moore
    I d go ahead and build it. after its put together she ll be amazed at how stiff it is. ... From: john To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday,
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 16, 2009
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      I'd go ahead and build it. after its put together she'll be amazed at how stiff it is.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: john
      To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 16, 2009 10:23 AM
      Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] I just bought canoe plans( prospector)





      well many thanks nick and charles. I was figureing 1/4 inch be fine. but the wife has the issues. seeing how i will be takeing my young children along with me on it. had her read your responces and she seems to be softening on her stance. I build and trim houses she said not boats so she was worried i was makeing a mistake she still not sure but you guys been a great help already. the half inch idea was attempt for me to enjoy building boat and still being able to take kids. but think issue is all but resolved thanks for the info on the bending through any curves in the boat. guess i was over thinking things a little there. --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Scott" <charles.k.scott@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi new guy, if you are talking about half inch thick strips, that would be
      > in my opinion *WAY* overkill. You would find the canoe unacceptably heavy.
      > The now standard ¼" thick strips have evolved to that dimension over many
      > years and is considered perfectly strong. What you might want to do is
      > visit a person who has a cedar strip canoe and see for yourself. Be sure to
      > bring your wife. Better yet, see if you can borrow the canoe and try it
      > out. You will discover that despite the ¼" thickness of the strips, the
      > hull is adequately strong.
      >
      >
      >
      > As to needing to bend the strips, the only bending that requires
      > extraordinary measures is for the stems. Gluing the strips in place does
      > not stress them so much as to require a heat gun or steaming, normally. If
      > you have a complex shape that involves a convex curve, perhaps some effort
      > to pre-shape the strips might be helpful. But the canoe I built did have
      > such a shape and held it's curves pretty closely just by clamping the strips
      > to the forms as I applied them.
      >
      >
      >
      > Remember, the hull is a sandwich of fiberglass and lightweight cedar. The
      > fiberglass and resin bind the cedar into a very stiff shape. Just don't go
      > running rocky rapids with it, unless you don't care how scratched the hull
      > will become.
      >
      >
      >
      > Corky Scott
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of john
      > Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 12:53 PM
      > To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] I just bought canoe plans( prospector)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I just purchased the plans for the prospector canoe. Now I have done a fair
      > bit of reading and fact that I am a carpenter by trade stepping into marine
      > carpentry does not worry me in the slightest. what my related experience has
      > not been able to help me with is I am figureing there will be some need for
      > bending some of the strips as I build the canoe. the typical 1/4 in
      > thickness I keep hearing as the standards for the strips a simple heat gun
      > if needed I beleive would do the job to aid in every thing going together.
      > Now my quandry is this canoe will see family activities and my kids are
      > 7,5,2 the wife seen the 1/4 inch number and I am unable to get her to
      > realize that the canoe will not buckle in the center and sinkk like the
      > titanic first time out. couple that with fact that my personel stomping
      > grounds the rivers and lakes can get low and there may be issues there. I am
      > sure going with slightly thicker strips not an issue beyond weight. now
      > haveing never built a canoe before and already thinking of going away from
      > the norm I want to know is say going with 1/2 inch strips going to create (
      > to me at least ) extra problems as i try to mold the wood to the curve of
      > the canoe? If so advice on the steam bending or boiling of wood would be
      > nice as i have not been able to find any reading material about it and know
      > no one with the knowledge.
      > any other insights into building wood strip canoe would be well met also.
      > thanks
      > signed the new guy.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • john
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 18, 2009
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        my seven yr old son has been canoeing with me a fair bit my daughter now 5 has recently started to also. the lazy rivers I typically travel are great for forced dumps which i have done a couple times with son so he knows what to do if it was to happen as for PFd's if i so much as hinted they not needed wife would slit my throat LOL. --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, charles.k.scott@... wrote:
        >
        > --- You wrote:
        > well many thanks nick and charles. I was figureing 1/4 inch be fine. but the wife has the issues. seeing how i will be takeing my young children along with me on it. had her read your responces and she seems to be softening on her stance.
        > --- end of quote ---
        >
        > No one will fault your wife for being concerned about the kids. They should all be wearing PFD's and also understand about not moving around too much, and also what to do should the canoe capsize.
        >
        > This is best done by practicing in shallow water, without a lot of current.
        >
        > The cedar strip canoes are just canoes. Canoes can be really stable, or pretty radical depending on what design you make.
        >
        > Corky Scott
        >
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