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Finally Starting

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  • longshot
    My son inlaw gave me an old toolcraft table saw. I purchased two thin kerf blades and a few feather boards. I got a bunch of North eastern white cedar for a
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 3 8:10 AM
      My son inlaw gave me an old toolcraft table saw. I purchased two thin
      kerf blades and a few feather boards. I got a bunch of North eastern
      white cedar for a buck a foot. It will require extra work but I have
      time. I bought two "canoe bits" for the router and I may have the use
      of a router table. I have the plans for a canoe with a stern and have
      lofted the stations and cut heavy paper patterns. Today I am replacing
      the motor in my bandsaw. One of my tenants gave me a 4 HP johnson and
      is bringing a 6 HP soon.

      Best of all I got a strongback from Craig's list for $25.00. It is
      made in three parts and is adjustable for canoes from 12 to 20 feet or
      so. Now I have to move a few things out of a room in my barn so I can
      started. The room is 35 X 12 feet and has a wood stove. I hope to get
      the hull glued up in the next three months and be ready to apply resin
      after the cold breaks.

      ...................Tom C
    • The Wolff Den
      Tom, I m a soon to be first time strip canoe builder as well. I have the patterns and stems ready, and the cedar in the garage ready to cut into strips. Any
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 3 8:29 AM
        Tom, I'm a soon to be first time strip canoe builder as well. I have the patterns and stems ready, and the cedar in the garage ready to cut into strips.

        Any chance you might send me a couple of pictures of your new strongback? I'm particularly interested in one that can be adaptable to hulls between 14 and 18 feet.

        MW





        ----- Original Message ----
        > From: longshot <longshot49@...>
        > To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, December 3, 2008 11:10:51 AM
        > Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Finally Starting
        >
        > My son inlaw gave me an old toolcraft table saw. I purchased two thin
        > kerf blades and a few feather boards. I got a bunch of North eastern
        > white cedar for a buck a foot. It will require extra work but I have
        > time. I bought two "canoe bits" for the router and I may have the use
        > of a router table. I have the plans for a canoe with a stern and have
        > lofted the stations and cut heavy paper patterns. Today I am replacing
        > the motor in my bandsaw. One of my tenants gave me a 4 HP johnson and
        > is bringing a 6 HP soon.
        >
        > Best of all I got a strongback from Craig's list for $25.00. It is
        > made in three parts and is adjustable for canoes from 12 to 20 feet or
        > so. Now I have to move a few things out of a room in my barn so I can
        > started. The room is 35 X 12 feet and has a wood stove. I hope to get
        > the hull glued up in the next three months and be ready to apply resin
        > after the cold breaks.
        >
        > ...................Tom C
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
        ... My son inlaw gave me an old toolcraft table saw. I purchased two thin kerf blades and a few feather boards. I got a bunch of North eastern white cedar for
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 3 10:52 AM
          --- You wrote:
          My son inlaw gave me an old toolcraft table saw. I purchased two thin
          kerf blades and a few feather boards. I got a bunch of North eastern
          white cedar for a buck a foot. It will require extra work but I have
          time. I bought two "canoe bits" for the router and I may have the use
          of a router table. I have the plans for a canoe with a stern and have
          lofted the stations and cut heavy paper patterns. Today I am replacing
          the motor in my bandsaw. One of my tenants gave me a 4 HP johnson and
          is bringing a 6 HP soon.

          Best of all I got a strongback from Craig's list for $25.00. It is
          made in three parts and is adjustable for canoes from 12 to 20 feet or
          so. Now I have to move a few things out of a room in my barn so I can
          started. The room is 35 X 12 feet and has a wood stove. I hope to get
          the hull glued up in the next three months and be ready to apply resin
          after the cold breaks.

          ...................Tom C
          --- end of quote ---

          Nice that you can get started Tom. Router tables are relatively inexpensive, or you can make one up yourself using particle board or perhaps you can score some plywood from somewhere. Or even some melamine coated particle board so that the strips slide easily.

          Here's a website that does a very good job of describing the process of creating bead and cove strips.

          http://www.michneboat.com/Builder%27s%20Corner.htm

          Have a good time.

          Corky Scott
        • longshot
          ... thin ... eastern ... have ... use ... have ... replacing ... and ... is ... or ... can ... get ... resin ... inexpensive, or you can make one up yourself
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 3 6:08 PM
            --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, charles.k.scott@... wrote:
            >
            > --- You wrote:
            > My son inlaw gave me an old toolcraft table saw. I purchased two
            thin
            > kerf blades and a few feather boards. I got a bunch of North
            eastern
            > white cedar for a buck a foot. It will require extra work but I
            have
            > time. I bought two "canoe bits" for the router and I may have the
            use
            > of a router table. I have the plans for a canoe with a stern and
            have
            > lofted the stations and cut heavy paper patterns. Today I am
            replacing
            > the motor in my bandsaw. One of my tenants gave me a 4 HP johnson
            and
            > is bringing a 6 HP soon.
            >
            > Best of all I got a strongback from Craig's list for $25.00. It
            is
            > made in three parts and is adjustable for canoes from 12 to 20 feet
            or
            > so. Now I have to move a few things out of a room in my barn so I
            can
            > started. The room is 35 X 12 feet and has a wood stove. I hope to
            get
            > the hull glued up in the next three months and be ready to apply
            resin
            > after the cold breaks.
            >
            > ...................Tom C
            > --- end of quote ---
            >
            > Nice that you can get started Tom. Router tables are relatively
            inexpensive, or you can make one up yourself using particle board or
            perhaps you can score some plywood from somewhere. Or even some
            melamine coated particle board so that the strips slide easily.
            >
            > Here's a website that does a very good job of describing the
            process of creating bead and cove strips.
            >
            > http://www.michneboat.com/Builder%27s%20Corner.htm
            >
            > Have a good time.
            >
            > Corky Scott
            >



            Thanks for that website Corky it answersed a few questions of mine
            and he used two blades with a spacer to cut two strips at once. I
            have a couple of metal lathes in the cellar and some aluminum stock
            that could make a spacer and a couple of stabilizers. I think I'll
            spend a day doing that

            ...............................Tom C
          • longshot
            ... have the patterns and stems ready, and the cedar in the garage ready to cut into strips. ... strongback? I m particularly interested in one that can be
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 3 6:41 PM
              --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, The Wolff Den
              <onebadscooter@...> wrote:
              >
              > Tom, I'm a soon to be first time strip canoe builder as well. I
              have the patterns and stems ready, and the cedar in the garage ready
              to cut into strips.
              >
              > Any chance you might send me a couple of pictures of your new
              strongback? I'm particularly interested in one that can be adaptable
              to hulls between 14 and 18 feet.
              >
              > MW
              >


              I got that strongback home and stuck it in the barn. I took three
              photos of it and I was going to post them but then I read the file on
              photo's in the file section, and I did everything wrong. However by
              the time I fix the details it wouldn't do you much good.

              Please excuse my messy barn that has been collecting stuff for three
              generations. It is my fault though, someone is throwing something out
              and I say don't do that and when I junk something I need it next
              week. Ok enough crying.

              The guy I bought the strongback from built a redwood canoe from Canoe
              Magzine Dec 1978. He mailed me copies of the article that I received
              today. He borrowed part of their strongback when he designed his. His
              is really cool.

              He made a frame out of two 2X6X10's and attached folding legs. Then
              he made two pieces that look like ironing board tops from 2X4's and I
              guess 2X12's. The ends are tapered just like the shape of a canoe.
              These two pieces slide back and forth for lenght and are held in
              place with long through bolts Sighting across the top it is dead
              level. I can't believe how lucky I was getting this for $25.00.

              I will put the photos in a folder called adjustable strongback. If
              you want me to take some measurements let me know......Tom C
            • longshot
              ... the patterns and stems ready, and the cedar in the garage ready to cut into strips. ... strongback? I m particularly interested in one that can be
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 3 6:50 PM
                --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, The Wolff Den
                <onebadscooter@...> wrote:
                >
                > Tom, I'm a soon to be first time strip canoe builder as well. I have
                the patterns and stems ready, and the cedar in the garage ready to cut
                into strips.
                >
                > Any chance you might send me a couple of pictures of your new
                strongback? I'm particularly interested in one that can be adaptable
                to hulls between 14 and 18 feet.
                >
                > MW
                >
                >


                Oh yeah the two center stations are mounted on T shaped sections of
                thick stock that are screwed in place...........Tom C
              • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
                ... Thanks for that website Corky it answersed a few questions of mine and he used two blades with a spacer to cut two strips at once. I have a couple of metal
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 8 8:33 AM
                  --- You wrote:
                  Thanks for that website Corky it answersed a few questions of mine
                  and he used two blades with a spacer to cut two strips at once. I
                  have a couple of metal lathes in the cellar and some aluminum stock
                  that could make a spacer and a couple of stabilizers. I think I'll
                  spend a day doing that

                  ...............................Tom C
                  --- end of quote ---

                  Tom, I found that website by googling "cedar strip canoe". There are a number of others that you might be interested in. John Michne is an obvious craftsman, perfectly willing to go to extraordinary lengths to get show quality cedar strip canoes.

                  There is another website that shows off art show quality canoes, that website can be found here: http://www.woodsongcanoes.com/canoes.htm

                  They are SO finely made that they also offer a polished mahogany stand for the canoe so that it can be displayed in the house, like the piece of art that it actually is.

                  You don't want to know how much they get for those things. You also wouldn't want to own one and put it in the water. Inevitably there are dings and scratches...

                  Mine looks nice, but it is a working canoe. Tippy, but working.

                  Corky
                • jahoove
                  Hi Tom, I used a spacer & a couple of planer blades for cutting strips. I had this old dado set which was destined for the trash so I took one of the cutters &
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 12 5:17 AM
                    Hi Tom,

                    I used a spacer & a couple of planer blades for cutting strips. I had
                    this old dado set which was destined for the trash so I took one of
                    the cutters & ground the ends off. This made a perfect spacer. One
                    thing you might want to avoid is feather boarding the planks too tight
                    (the side featherboards). This can overheat & dull the outside blade
                    plus it scorches the wood.

                    I used my strongback as an in-feed table. Tacked a fence on it. It
                    worked very well given the 20' planks of redwood that I had to rip.

                    --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, charles.k.scott@... wrote:
                    >
                    > --- You wrote:
                    > Thanks for that website Corky it answersed a few questions of mine
                    > and he used two blades with a spacer to cut two strips at once. I
                    > have a couple of metal lathes in the cellar and some aluminum stock
                    > that could make a spacer and a couple of stabilizers. I think I'll
                    > spend a day doing that
                    >
                    > ...............................Tom C
                    > --- end of quote ---
                    >
                    > Tom, I found that website by googling "cedar strip canoe". There
                    are a number of others that you might be interested in. John Michne
                    is an obvious craftsman, perfectly willing to go to extraordinary
                    lengths to get show quality cedar strip canoes.
                    >
                    > There is another website that shows off art show quality canoes,
                    that website can be found here:
                    http://www.woodsongcanoes.com/canoes.htm
                    >
                    > They are SO finely made that they also offer a polished mahogany
                    stand for the canoe so that it can be displayed in the house, like
                    the piece of art that it actually is.
                    >
                    > You don't want to know how much they get for those things. You
                    also wouldn't want to own one and put it in the water. Inevitably
                    there are dings and scratches...
                    >
                    > Mine looks nice, but it is a working canoe. Tippy, but working.
                    >
                    > Corky
                    >
                  • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
                    ... Hi Tom, I used a spacer & a couple of planer blades for cutting strips. I had this old dado set which was destined for the trash so I took one of the
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 12 6:13 AM
                      --- You wrote:
                      Hi Tom,

                      I used a spacer & a couple of planer blades for cutting strips. I had
                      this old dado set which was destined for the trash so I took one of
                      the cutters & ground the ends off. This made a perfect spacer. One
                      thing you might want to avoid is feather boarding the planks too tight
                      (the side featherboards). This can overheat & dull the outside blade
                      plus it scorches the wood.
                      --- end of quote ---

                      Several things can help the process of ripping the strips. Using feather boards is a good idea as long as you don't use them to push the plank against the blade itself. In addition to a feather board to hold the plank firmly to the fence, it is also a good idea to clamp featherboards to the fence to hold the plank down tight to the table. You should have two, one in front of the blade and one after. They reduce or eliminate chatter.

                      Having someone to help you pull the strips through is a great help, but not absolutely necessary. I never had anyone to help while milling the strips and things worked out fine.

                      I chose to rip the strips slightly oversize, rather than try to get them exactly 1/4" wide using the table saw. I also have a band saw which some people have used to try to get the most possible strips out of a plank of cedar because it has such a narrow blade there is less wastage. But I did not use it to rip strips.

                      But since I had to scarf so many pieces together, I figured I'd rip them oversize (3/8"), glue them together at the scarf joints and then run them through the planer to get them down to the correct width. I thought that this would not only clean up any saw marks, but would also smooth out the glue joints. This was in fact how things worked out. I ended up with smooth strips of varying color and shade, all in one length, which were of the proper dimension to then bead and cove.

                      The bead and cove operation was relatively seamless, but there is one hint: Create the bead edge first. It is a LOT less fragile than the cove edge, so you can use the feather board to hold it tight to the router table fence without damaging it. You would not be able to do that with the cove edge, unless you created a bead edge feather board to fit to it, which would be going through a whole lot of trouble.

                      Corky Scott
                    • djohnson450@comcast.net
                      A feather board should never be placed in a position where it is pushing against a blade.  Not only will it shorten blade life, it is unsafe.  The purpose of
                      Message 10 of 17 , Dec 12 8:09 AM
                        A feather board should never be placed in a position where it is pushing against a blade.  Not only will it shorten blade life, it is unsafe.  The purpose of a feather board is to hold the wood against the fence not the blade.  I would also caution against using a spacer, such as a dado spacer, and altering it.  If it is not perfectly balanced it will ruin the bearings on the arbor shaft real quick.  Having a feather board up against a blade will also throw off the balance and ruin the bearings.



                        DavidJ




                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "charles k scott" <charles.k.scott@...>
                        To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, December 12, 2008 6:13:33 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
                        Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Finally Starting






                        --- You wrote:
                        Hi Tom,

                        I used a spacer & a couple of planer blades for cutting strips. I had
                        this old dado set which was destined for the trash so I took one of
                        the cutters & ground the ends off. This made a perfect spacer. One
                        thing you might want to avoid is feather boarding the planks too tight
                        (the side featherboards). This can overheat & dull the outside blade
                        plus it scorches the wood.
                        --- end of quote ---

                        Several things can help the process of ripping the strips. Using feather boards is a good idea as long as you don't use them to push the plank against the blade itself. In addition to a feather board to hold the plank firmly to the fence, it is also a good idea to clamp featherboards to the fence to hold the plank down tight to the table. You should have two, one in front of the blade and one after. They reduce or eliminate chatter.

                        Having someone to help you pull the strips through is a great help, but not absolutely necessary. I never had anyone to help while milling the strips and things worked out fine.

                        I chose to rip the strips slightly oversize, rather than try to get them exactly 1/4" wide using the table saw. I also have a band saw which some people have used to try to get the most possible strips out of a plank of cedar because it has such a narrow blade there is less wastage. But I did not use it to rip strips.

                        But since I had to scarf so many pieces together, I figured I'd rip them oversize (3/8"), glue them together at the scarf joints and then run them through the planer to get them down to the correct width. I thought that this would not only clean up any saw marks, but would also smooth out the glue joints. This was in fact how things worked out. I ended up with smooth strips of varying color and shade, all in one length, which were of the proper dimension to then bead and cove.

                        The bead and cove operation was relatively seamless, but there is one hint: Create the bead edge first. It is a LOT less fragile than the cove edge, so you can use the feather board to hold it tight to the router table fence without damaging it. You would not be able to do that with the cove edge, unless you created a bead edge feather board to fit to it, which would be going through a whole lot of trouble.

                        Corky Scott



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • jeff
                        If you want to alter a saw blade there is a balancing tool avaible that you can use. It s cone shaped, and sets on a spike. You place the blade on the cone and
                        Message 11 of 17 , Dec 12 8:28 AM
                          If you want to alter a saw blade there is a balancing tool avaible that you can use. It's cone shaped, and sets on a spike. You place the blade on the cone and then make a note of witch side is heaver the remove metal from that side till you get it ballanced. It works like an old style tire ballancer, if your familar with them.
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: djohnson450@...
                          To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, December 12, 2008 11:09 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Finally Starting




                          A feather board should never be placed in a position where it is pushing against a blade. Not only will it shorten blade life, it is unsafe. The purpose of a feather board is to hold the wood against the fence not the blade. I would also caution against using a spacer, such as a dado spacer, and altering it. If it is not perfectly balanced it will ruin the bearings on the arbor shaft real quick. Having a feather board up against a blade will also throw off the balance and ruin the bearings.

                          DavidJ
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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
                          ... If you want to alter a saw blade there is a balancing tool avaible that you can use. It s cone shaped, and sets on a spike. You place the blade on the cone
                          Message 12 of 17 , Dec 12 8:38 AM
                            --- You wrote:
                            If you want to alter a saw blade there is a balancing tool avaible that you can use. It's cone shaped, and sets on a spike. You place the blade on the cone and then make a note of witch side is heaver the remove metal from that side till you get it ballanced. It works like an old style tire ballancer, if your familar with them.
                            --- end of quote ---

                            I actually used to balance tires using such a device when I was an auto mechanic back in 1973. The process is called "static" balancing. Unfortunately it did not balance the tire "dynamically", although it was usually close enough.

                            These days the balancing machines tell you where and how much weight is required both on the inside and outside of the rim, and the spots for the weights are usually not directly opposite each other, nor are they the same weight.

                            Corky Scott
                          • jahoove
                            Corky, That s interesting. I didn t think about balancing my dado cutter spacer after I chopped the ends off. Good thought. However, I didn t notice any
                            Message 13 of 17 , Dec 12 8:57 AM
                              Corky,

                              That's interesting. I didn't think about balancing my dado cutter
                              spacer after I chopped the ends off. Good thought. However, I didn't
                              notice any problem after cutting all the strips. My old dado cutter &
                              planer blades were all designed for a 5/8" arbor & rated for the RPMs
                              so I wasn't too worried about it. I searched for a 1/4" thick bushing
                              all over the place.


                              --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, charles.k.scott@... wrote:
                              >
                              > --- You wrote:
                              > If you want to alter a saw blade there is a balancing tool avaible
                              that you can use. It's cone shaped, and sets on a spike. You place
                              the blade on the cone and then make a note of witch side is heaver
                              the remove metal from that side till you get it ballanced. It works
                              like an old style tire ballancer, if your familar with them.
                              > --- end of quote ---
                              >
                              > I actually used to balance tires using such a device when I was an
                              auto mechanic back in 1973. The process is called "static"
                              balancing. Unfortunately it did not balance the tire "dynamically",
                              although it was usually close enough.
                              >
                              > These days the balancing machines tell you where and how much
                              weight is required both on the inside and outside of the rim, and the
                              spots for the weights are usually not directly opposite each other,
                              nor are they the same weight.
                              >
                              > Corky Scott
                              >
                            • jahoove
                              Corky, I was taught to avoid planing glue but that was long ago & glue has changed a lot. How were the glued scarf joints on your planer blades? What kind of
                              Message 14 of 17 , Dec 12 9:16 AM
                                Corky,

                                I was taught to avoid planing glue but that was long ago & glue has
                                changed a lot. How were the glued scarf joints on your planer blades?
                                What kind of planer do you use & does the manual mention any
                                materials to avoid?

                                --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, charles.k.scott@... wrote:
                                >
                                > --- You wrote:
                                > Hi Tom,
                                >
                                > I used a spacer & a couple of planer blades for cutting strips. I
                                had
                                > this old dado set which was destined for the trash so I took one of
                                > the cutters & ground the ends off. This made a perfect spacer. One
                                > thing you might want to avoid is feather boarding the planks too
                                tight
                                > (the side featherboards). This can overheat & dull the outside
                                blade
                                > plus it scorches the wood.
                                > --- end of quote ---
                                >
                                > Several things can help the process of ripping the strips. Using
                                feather boards is a good idea as long as you don't use them to push
                                the plank against the blade itself. In addition to a feather board
                                to hold the plank firmly to the fence, it is also a good idea to
                                clamp featherboards to the fence to hold the plank down tight to the
                                table. You should have two, one in front of the blade and one
                                after. They reduce or eliminate chatter.
                                >
                                > Having someone to help you pull the strips through is a great help,
                                but not absolutely necessary. I never had anyone to help while
                                milling the strips and things worked out fine.
                                >
                                > I chose to rip the strips slightly oversize, rather than try to get
                                them exactly 1/4" wide using the table saw. I also have a band saw
                                which some people have used to try to get the most possible strips
                                out of a plank of cedar because it has such a narrow blade there is
                                less wastage. But I did not use it to rip strips.
                                >
                                > But since I had to scarf so many pieces together, I figured I'd rip
                                them oversize (3/8"), glue them together at the scarf joints and then
                                run them through the planer to get them down to the correct width. I
                                thought that this would not only clean up any saw marks, but would
                                also smooth out the glue joints. This was in fact how things worked
                                out. I ended up with smooth strips of varying color and shade, all
                                in one length, which were of the proper dimension to then bead and
                                cove.
                                >
                                > The bead and cove operation was relatively seamless, but there is
                                one hint: Create the bead edge first. It is a LOT less fragile than
                                the cove edge, so you can use the feather board to hold it tight to
                                the router table fence without damaging it. You would not be able to
                                do that with the cove edge, unless you created a bead edge feather
                                board to fit to it, which would be going through a whole lot of
                                trouble.
                                >
                                > Corky Scott
                                >
                              • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
                                ... Corky, That s interesting. I didn t think about balancing my dado cutter spacer after I chopped the ends off. Good thought. However, I didn t notice any
                                Message 15 of 17 , Dec 12 9:17 AM
                                  --- You wrote:
                                  Corky,

                                  That's interesting. I didn't think about balancing my dado cutter
                                  spacer after I chopped the ends off. Good thought. However, I didn't
                                  notice any problem after cutting all the strips. My old dado cutter &
                                  planer blades were all designed for a 5/8" arbor & rated for the RPMs
                                  so I wasn't too worried about it. I searched for a 1/4" thick bushing
                                  all over the place.
                                  --- end of quote ---

                                  I wasn't the guy who suggested balancing the spacers, I was just thowing in a bit of interest about a previous life. :-)

                                  Corky Scott
                                • Jim Fox
                                  A good glue like Titebond will dry considerably harder than the wood it s used on, it will chip carbide blades. At $100 a blade I avoid cutting glue joints on
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Dec 12 9:24 AM
                                    A good glue like Titebond will dry considerably harder than the wood it's used on, it will chip carbide blades. At $100 a blade I avoid cutting glue joints on my table saw.

                                    --- On Fri, 12/12/08, jahoove <jahoove@...> wrote:

                                    From: jahoove <jahoove@...>
                                    Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Finally Starting
                                    To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Friday, December 12, 2008, 12:16 PM






                                    Corky,

                                    I was taught to avoid planing glue but that was long ago & glue has
                                    changed a lot. How were the glued scarf joints on your planer blades?
                                    What kind of planer do you use & does the manual mention any
                                    materials to avoid?

                                    --- In

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
                                    ... Corky, I was taught to avoid planing glue but that was long ago & glue has changed a lot. How were the glued scarf joints on your planer blades? What kind
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Dec 12 9:30 AM
                                      --- You wrote:
                                      Corky,

                                      I was taught to avoid planing glue but that was long ago & glue has
                                      changed a lot. How were the glued scarf joints on your planer blades?
                                      What kind of planer do you use & does the manual mention any
                                      materials to avoid?
                                      --- end of quote ---

                                      I think I had several failures in the several hundred scarf joints I had to do to get the full length strips I needed. Those were the result of either the glue draining out of the joint while it was curing, or perhaps the joint being too tight.

                                      I did not go to any great lengths to get a planer blade, just picked a Freud planer blade off the rack at Home Depot that had the narrowest kerf I could find.

                                      I knew that since I was going to plane the strips after they were all glued, I did not worry about saw ridges that occur because the work stops going through the blade. I knew they'd come off in the planer.

                                      I used a Christmas special Grizzley 12.5" planer that I bought for around $210. It isn't fancy, but it does the job. The manual doesn't say not to use certain woods, but it does suggest that you limit how much you try to remove when planing hardwoods. It also suggests limiting removal of material in each pass to less than 1/16" material. I ended up being more conservative than that, removing less for each pass.

                                      Sure does make a lot of shavings! The shavings went for mulch in my wife's flower gardens.

                                      Corky Scott
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