Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Interior stem tapes applied

Expand Messages
  • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
    Lots of sanding this weekend and a little epoxy work. I got the scraper from Newfound Woodworks and also the foam addition for the orbital sander. I found
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 5, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Lots of sanding this weekend and a little epoxy work. I got the scraper from Newfound Woodworks and also the foam addition for the orbital sander.

      I found both to be of marginal use. The scraper wasn't as effective as the rounded rasp at taking off the hardened glue, although it did work, and took the glue off right down to the wood while the rasp leaves a bit left.

      The foam piece for the orbital sander was a bit of a disappointment in that it just did not seem to get the job done. I found that using the 60 grit pad with the original base and LOTS of movement with the sander worked fine. Yes, it tended to dull the sandpaper at the edges of the pad leaving the inside of the pad unused, but no biggie, I'm saving them for use in other projects that have wood to sand that is flat.

      Having the vacuum attached I'm finding is a really good thing. It does suck up most of the sawdust not only from the hull, but keeps it from hanging in the air too. I'm getting used to using it with the hose attached but it really seems to be putting a strain on the shop vac. It keeps chugging away, but does sound strained trying to suck through the sander. If I could open a port in the hose somehow to bleed off some vacuum, I'd do it.

      I also filleted both stems mixing colloidal suspension with the epoxy to thicken it, then applied it with my fingers to achieve the fillet. Once that cured, I sanded it out and painted on more epoxy and applied the fiberglass tape that I'd cut out on a 45 degree bias. It formed around the curve of the hull very nicely, with no ripples. I finished wetting that out and called it a day. Newfound recommends applying tape like this because they suggest slicing the fiberglass along the stems when that goes on, and bonding it to either side of the stem. It just makes for an easier job than trying to set it around the stem without slicing it. Having the tape already on the stems means you don't have to deal with unfiberglassed wood after you're done.

      The hull is all sanded on the inside now, although I need to go over it more carefully for missed globs of glue that once sanded resembles the wood. I think there are a few of those I need to take care of. I was wondering if it mattered, and noticed that when I applied the resin for the tape the wood took on a different hue from one spot of glue that hadn't quite been removed. So before I apply the sealer coat of epoxy, I need to look it over again.

      Corky Scott
    • Craig Addis
      ... effective as the rounded rasp at taking off the hardened glue, although it did work, and took the glue off right down to the wood while the rasp leaves a
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 5, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com, charles.k.scott@... wrote:
        > I found both to be of marginal use. The scraper wasn't as
        effective as the rounded rasp at taking off the hardened glue,
        although it did work, and took the glue off right down to the wood
        while the rasp leaves a bit left.
        >

        Which scraper blade? The crescent shaped one held at different
        angles to the hull worked well for me, personally, but different
        folks like different methods and different tools.

        >
        > If I could open a port in the hose somehow to bleed off some
        vacuum, I'd do it.
        >

        Check your hose's ends - I know the one that I got to go with my
        Bosch sander has a little bleed port that you can open up by rotating
        a ring on the fitting where it hooks up to the sander. Makes the
        shop-vac happier!

        > I also filleted both stems mixing colloidal suspension with the
        epoxy to thicken it, then applied it with my fingers to achieve the
        fillet.
        >

        ??? Filleted the inside stem or the outside one?

        > The hull is all sanded on the inside now, although I need to go
        over it more carefully for missed globs of glue that once sanded
        resembles the wood. I think there are a few of those I need to take
        care of. I was wondering if it mattered, and noticed that when I
        applied the resin for the tape the wood took on a different hue from
        one spot of glue that hadn't quite been removed. So before I apply
        the sealer coat of epoxy, I need to look it over again.
        >

        Glue is your enemy here. It shows up like crazy with the epoxy. Go
        over your hull with a damp sponge when you think you've got it all.
        Circle the glue spots with a pencil (Lightly!) and then go back and
        get the offending areas. Sand all over to get the grain that you
        raised with the sponge before the sealer coat.
      • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
        ... Filleted the inside stems. The outside stems are flush with the hull, no filleting necessary. The inside stems just need something to round off where they
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 5, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- You wrote:
          ??? Filleted the inside stem or the outside one?
          --- end of quote ---

          Filleted the inside stems. The outside stems are flush with the hull, no filleting necessary.

          The inside stems just need something to round off where they meet the hull so that the fiberglass does not have a sharp bend to conform to. Fiberglass likes curves, not sharp corners.

          The filleting has a secondary benefit of stiffening and strengthening the bow and stern.

          Corky Scott
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.