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Re: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Kerf Blade Wobble

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  • charles.k.scott@dartmouth.edu
    ... Thanks everyone for the information. I live about 500 km round trip to the nearest tool outlet so I want to be prepared in knowing what I am looking for.
    Message 1 of 31 , Nov 1, 2007
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      --- You wrote:
      Thanks everyone for the information. I live about 500 km round trip
      to the nearest tool outlet so I want to be prepared in knowing what I
      am looking for. I will check out first all the suggestions everyone
      have mentioned to date and any more that may be added.
      I do own and use a good 12 inch Delta planner but I guess it may be a
      touch of lazyness or efficiency that if I can remove one step of the
      work I will. I do like the cut from that blade so would like to
      continue with it.

      Murray
      --- end of quote ---

      There also are, or used to be, planing blades that did not have carbon teeth. The teeth also were not cronked to alternate sides. This meant that the blade cut a kerf exactly the same width as the blade, so it made for a very smooth saw cut.

      None of the blades I had lasted very long, but they sure cut smoothly while they were sharp. It was as if the wood you ripped had been planed.

      Corky Scott
    • Craig Addis
      One of the big issues that I had when I was designing the router table was the adjustability of the whole thing. First, 1 S4S red cedar isn t as thick as it
      Message 31 of 31 , Nov 2, 2007
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        One of the big issues that I had when I was designing the router
        table was the adjustability of the whole thing.

        First, 1" S4S red cedar isn't as thick as it used to be. (less than
        3/4" actual thickness!) I also wanted to be able to put cove and
        bead edges on wider assemblies that are to be used as feature strips
        (Up to about 3" wide)

        Second, I knew from building a quick-and-dirty plywood router table
        with a clamped on fence that the adjustment to get a good cove cut
        without edges that were either too thin, or too thick, that I needed
        good adjustability. You've got to be able to adjust the thing to
        within a gnat's behind to be able to get those right.

        Third, I wanted to be able to do other thicknesses of strip (up to
        1/2" thick)

        Some things that I'd like to change about the design:

        -I used a screw to adjust the cutter's centerline to the fence to get
        a good cove depth. It works well, but I didn't allow for a similar
        adjustment for the total strip width (Distance between cutter-
        heads.) A big "duh" moment on my part, there.

        -Make the table longer on the in and out-feed.

        - Make some allowance on the table to improve the mounting of
        featherboards to the table - either a t-slot or some threaded inserts.

        -Bring the vertical fences down to the table surface instead of using
        the edge of a piece of plywood.

        -I would make some mount for a shop-vac hose or some other dust
        collection system to be integral with the table - this thing cuts a
        lot of stock and makes lots of dust and chips.

        -Put a junction box on the table with two sockets and a single power
        switch so that I can turn both routers on and off at the same time as
        a safety procedure.

        -I _might_ add a power feeder - it could be as simple as a surplus AC
        gearmotor with a rubber faced wheel.

        If I write an article, it will be about revision "B" of this thing.

        Craig Addis
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