Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

dwclow: It wasn't made from a kit.

Expand Messages
  • iron_eddy
    Three major important things happened to get this canoe paddling. Went to Maine to buy a pair of work boots and find a canoe building book. Got the work boots
    Message 1 of 716 , Sep 30, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Three major important things happened to get this
      canoe paddling. Went to Maine to buy a pair of work
      boots and find a canoe building book. Got the work
      boots then made way for the book section. There it was,
      though I didn't know it at the time, Gilpatrick's canoe
      building book. Flipping through the pages I immediately
      knew I could do this. Everything seemed so simple. Now
      I had my instructions.<br>I didn't pick the lumber
      for the cedar strips. Our local lumber yards don't
      carry cedar planks. But it was one of these lumber
      yards that ordered the cedar planks for me. I watched
      and listened as the lumber yard worker ordered the
      timbers from another yard. He explained to the other
      company that the cedar planks were to be used for
      building a canoe. He kept reiterating that fact. I
      provided only the board foot quantity and
      thickness.<br>Two weeks later the lumber arrived. It looked all
      beat up. Rough. There was still bark on some planks.
      The planks were cupped. The ends were cracked and
      splitting.<br>Two things went right. I paid the lumber yard to
      plane the cedar planks to 7\8in. thick. I spoke with
      the man who was to do the planning. I told him the
      timbers would be used for building a canoe. He knew his
      work well. He planned all the planks to exactly 7\8in.
      thick(+-1\64in.)while keeping material waste to a minimum. Consistancy
      of cedar strip width is very important when
      stripping the canoes hull. <br>Back to that phone
      conversation: "it's going to be used to build a canoe", he
      reiterated again and again. The lumber consisted of 7
      planks. They came in lengths from 6 to 12 foot long(my
      canoe is a 16 footer). I spent one Sunday afternoon
      stripping all those freshly plane boards into canoe strips.
      6 of those planks produced strips that had nice
      longitudinal straight grains. The grains ran the whole length
      of the strip on a great majority of them. One plank
      produced irregular grains. Those resulting strips were
      warped and twisted. I didn't use any of those strips on
      the canoe. Good thing I ordered a few extra board
      feet. <br>Conclusions: Good reliable instruction book;
      Consistant planning of all cedar planks to the same
      thickness; and cedar strips having longitudinal straight
      grain. <br>This was my foundation. And it was strong.
      And I got lucky with the book and the cedar planks.
      I'm no expert at choosing grains.<br>Ricky I.
    • gabriel1127604
      ... Hey JR! So glad to see everybody back! I had almost given up hope. As regards request for pics, be patient a little bit and I will dig through old photos
      Message 716 of 716 , Mar 24, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        > JRsloan wrote:
        > Reply: Hard to argue with a guy about armorplate if he never gets a
        > ding. Meanwhile, how about a pix of this rig so the rest of us can
        > see what we're trying to copy??? JR

        Hey JR!

        So glad to see everybody back! I had almost given up hope.

        As regards request for pics, be patient a little bit and I will dig
        through old photos and post these later this week.

        Gabe
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.