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[Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Too much chatter!

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  • John Howard
    Corky, Jeff, Like doh! As Corky pointed out you need a SHARP Blade, otherwise it wont matter what kind, brand or cost of plane, chisel, knife or other cutting
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 22, 2007
      Corky, Jeff,

      Like doh! As Corky pointed out you need a SHARP Blade, otherwise it
      wont matter what kind, brand or cost of plane, chisel, knife or other
      cutting tool, powered or unpowered you use. I use both metal and wood
      body planes, each one with it's own characteristics. If you can't
      sharpen the blades yourself (and you should really learn how), find a
      service that can do it for you.

      Like Corky, I have used and still use a grinding wheel, oil stones
      and leather strop. Unlike Corky, I have stopped looking for the
      newest and latest sharpening machine. I know, some people prefer
      water stones, sandpaper, or machines, but the oil stones work for me.
      It is the method my father taught me and still works. Being right
      handed, my left fore arm is usually "bare of hair" from "testing" the
      sharpness of the blades after a sharpening session. It takes lots of
      practice to learn how to grind a blade freehand without burning it
      and to "stone" the blade, but once learned, you can touch up a blade
      in no time. And don't wait to sharpen a blade that needs it, stop and
      do it.

      Yes, there are a lot of guides to attach to your blades and other
      tools that can make it easier and faster to sharpen your tools, but
      learning how to do it correctly is worth the time spent learning no
      matter what method or system you use.

      A few more points to ponder;

      1. Wash your hands after sharpening your tools, especially if you
      have stopped in the middle of a project to touch up the blade. Dirty
      finger prints are ugly and a pain to remove.
      2. Clean your tools for the same reason, a streak of oil or dirt is
      also ugly.
      3. Wax the base of your planes with a good hard wax, the plane will
      slide over the surface easier. I use paste wax like Turtle Wax or
      Johnson's. The wax will also help control rust.
      4. A thicker Blade will "chatter" less than a thin one, but don't
      rush out to buy one unless you really need it.
      5. A flat "sole" (bottom) helps. Some of the cheaper planes can be
      concave resulting in a thicker in the middle shaving. Sand paper on
      the table saw (or other flat surface) can help flatten the "sole".
      6. A sharp blade with a polished, flat back will usually stay sharper
      longer, be easier to and faster to sharpen than a sharp blade with
      the factory back. Pay atension to the back, it is time well spent.
      7. Use the proper size plane for the job. Don't try to true up a long
      board with a block plane or use a jack plane to touch up a spot.
      8. It will take time to properly sharpen and tune both the plane and
      blade. Cheap planes take longer, so invest wisely, but don't go nuts.
      I use mostly Stanley (being a carpenter and Stanley are availeable
      every where), but brands like Record and Lie-Neilson are good planes
      (and much more expensive). Wood Body planes are also nice, usually
      have a much thicker blade and are often lighter in weight (less
      tireing). I often use my Stanley Block plane to rough trim and use my
      wooden block plane to finish (lighter and easier to control).
      9. Treat your planes (and chisels) with care, lay them on their side
      to keep the blade sharp and have a special place to store them, don't
      toss them in the tool box where other tools can damage the blades you
      just spent time sharpening.
    • Tim Greiner
      Jeffrey- A buddy of mine bought the glass and sandpaper with jig setup and has had nothing but good things to say about that system- economical, easy to use
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 22, 2007
        Jeffrey-

        A buddy of mine bought the glass and sandpaper with jig setup and has
        had nothing but good things to say about that system- economical,
        easy to use and produces a nice edge.

        All the advice I've seen in the last posts has been good.

        Sometimes the wood simply won't cooperate with a plane- my boat is a
        mix of Western Red and Alaska Yellow cedars, the WRC planes easily
        while the AYC tears out and changes grain direction so often that
        planing was worse than sanding. In a case like that, the high speed
        sander is the best bet.

        Tim Greiner

        --- jeffrey wrote:
        >
        > My block plane & spokeshave skills have much to be desired. I'm
        getting
        > too much chatter, particularly on the hardwoods. Every now & then I
        > have a Zen moment when these tools work well for me....a rare
        > occurance. I have no problem keeping them sharp with a stone & jig
        but
        > that's about all I have in common with these hand tools.
        >
        > Any "plane" words of advice? Does the ground angle of the blade
        make
        > any difference? Is a fine stone good enough? Should I mess with the
        > angle of the blade as it is mounted in the tool? Should I cut
        slightly
        > off perpendicular to the grain of wood?
        >
      • jeffrey hoover
        Tim, You have confirmed what I have suspected but don t have the plane experience to be sure. The different woods that I am using are all behaving different
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 22, 2007
          Tim,



          You have confirmed what I have suspected but don't have the "plane"
          experience to be sure. The different woods that I am using are all behaving
          different regardless of how sharp I make the tool. Mahogany is the worst &
          redwood is the best. Strangely, the redder the redwood the better it planes.
          Fortunately, I have lots of grinding & sanding tools.



          The glass & sandpaper sharpening technique sounds interesting. I don't have
          a very nice set of stones & don't have the cash for expensive sharpening
          tools.



          Thanks!

          Jeff

          -----Original Message-----
          From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim Greiner
          Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2007 1:56 PM
          To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] Re: Too much chatter!



          Jeffrey-

          A buddy of mine bought the glass and sandpaper with jig setup and has
          had nothing but good things to say about that system- economical,
          easy to use and produces a nice edge.

          All the advice I've seen in the last posts has been good.

          Sometimes the wood simply won't cooperate with a plane- my boat is a
          mix of Western Red and Alaska Yellow cedars, the WRC planes easily
          while the AYC tears out and changes grain direction so often that
          planing was worse than sanding. In a case like that, the high speed
          sander is the best bet.

          Tim Greiner

          --- jeffrey wrote:
          >
          > My block plane & spokeshave skills have much to be desired. I'm
          getting
          > too much chatter, particularly on the hardwoods. Every now & then I
          > have a Zen moment when these tools work well for me....a rare
          > occurance. I have no problem keeping them sharp with a stone & jig
          but
          > that's about all I have in common with these hand tools.
          >
          > Any "plane" words of advice? Does the ground angle of the blade
          make
          > any difference? Is a fine stone good enough? Should I mess with the
          > angle of the blade as it is mounted in the tool? Should I cut
          slightly
          > off perpendicular to the grain of wood?
          >





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