Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

new member intro and question

Expand Messages
  • Ron Niklasson
    Hi all, I m a woodworker from the mountains of northwest Georgia. My kids are grown and gone from the house and I want to spend some quality time with my wife.
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 18, 2006
      Hi all,
      I'm a woodworker from the mountains of northwest
      Georgia. My kids are grown and gone from the house and
      I want to spend some quality time with my wife. She
      likes to fish and I like the water. I have the
      woodworking tools and have decided to try to build a
      wood strip canoe. I've researched wooden canoes online
      and just purchased the book "Canoecraft". Being cheap,
      I saw plans in the book and thought that 20 dollars
      for the book with 8 different canoe plans was cheaper
      than 35 dollars for one set of plans from a canoe
      company that I found online. After reading some of the
      book, I discovered they talked about "lofting" the
      plans. $35 is starting to sound a little better. On
      the other hand, I get to learn something new and have
      more freedom to learn how to alter plans to make a
      better canoe.
      That said, does anyone have a link to a good
      description on how to loft plans and what all the
      measurements mean?
      Thanks in advance,
      Ron

      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com
    • Scott & Jane
      Hi Ron, I am building the Redbird from the book that you have. Trust me, the lofting is really pretty simple. Read through the directions a few times and it
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 18, 2006
        Hi Ron,



        I am building the Redbird from the book that you have. Trust me, the
        lofting is really pretty simple. Read through the directions a few times
        and it will become clear. I would recommend photocopying the table of
        offsets at an enlarged size and then label all the columns as either an �X�
        dimension or a �Y� dimension. Then just draw it out one point at a time and
        connect the dots!



        I am 3 planks away from closing the bottom of the hull and still have the
        short pieces to finish at the bow and stern.



        Best of luck,



        Scott Carroll

        Lakeside, CA.



        _____

        From: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Niklasson
        Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2006 10:38 AM
        To: cedarstripcanoes@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Cedar Strip Canoes] new member intro and question



        Hi all,
        I'm a woodworker from the mountains of northwest
        Georgia. My kids are grown and gone from the house and
        I want to spend some quality time with my wife. She
        likes to fish and I like the water. I have the
        woodworking tools and have decided to try to build a
        wood strip canoe. I've researched wooden canoes online
        and just purchased the book "Canoecraft". Being cheap,
        I saw plans in the book and thought that 20 dollars
        for the book with 8 different canoe plans was cheaper
        than 35 dollars for one set of plans from a canoe
        company that I found online. After reading some of the
        book, I discovered they talked about "lofting" the
        plans. $35 is starting to sound a little better. On
        the other hand, I get to learn something new and have
        more freedom to learn how to alter plans to make a
        better canoe.
        That said, does anyone have a link to a good
        description on how to loft plans and what all the
        measurements mean?
        Thanks in advance,
        Ron

        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        HYPERLINK "http://mail.yahoo.com"http://mail.yahoo.com



        SPONSORED LINKS


        HYPERLINK
        "http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Canoeing+and+kayaking&w1=Canoeing+and+k
        ayaking&w2=Paddling+gear&w3=Wood+strip&c=3&s=62&.sig=JhycYP_YqMUmP-sAQDAwDA"
        Canoeing and kayaking

        HYPERLINK
        "http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Paddling+gear&w1=Canoeing+and+kayaking&
        w2=Paddling+gear&w3=Wood+strip&c=3&s=62&.sig=rXZnTnLPis3OfCqNfzZmVw"Paddling
        gear

        HYPERLINK
        "http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Wood+strip&w1=Canoeing+and+kayaking&w2=
        Paddling+gear&w3=Wood+strip&c=3&s=62&.sig=xVDEvyeT1nBkImo36eXQqw"Wood strip



        _____

        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS



        * Visit your group "HYPERLINK
        "http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cedarstripcanoes"cedarstripcanoes" on the
        web.

        * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        HYPERLINK
        "mailto:cedarstripcanoes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe"ced
        arstripcanoes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the HYPERLINK
        "http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/"Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        _____


        --
        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.11/264 - Release Date: 2/17/2006



        --
        No virus found in this outgoing message.
        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.11/264 - Release Date: 2/17/2006



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jon
        Ron, Don t let yourself be intimidated by the lofting process. Lofting is nothing more than plotting a curve from X - Y coordinates! Imagine a big piece of
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 18, 2006
          Ron,

          Don't let yourself be intimidated by the lofting process. Lofting is nothing more than plotting a curve from X - Y coordinates!

          Imagine a big piece of graph paper with lines set 2" apart. On the table of heights, the Profile 0 line is the centerline. The Butt 2 line corresponds the first line located 2" to the right and left of the centerline. The Butt 4 line corresponds with the lines 2" outside of those.

          The Table of Breadths correspond to the horizontal lines of the 'big graph paper.' The WL ## corresponds the the ## of inches above the bottom line of the graph. For example, WL10 is the horizontal line that is 10" above the bottom of the graph.

          If you loft onto a piece of paper, you may loft one side only and then when you transfer it to your plywood, you do one half at a time.

          When plotting the heights, you simply put a dot on each verticle line (i.e. Butt 2", Butt 4", Butt 6", etc) at the height as listed on the table. When plotting the half-breadths, you put a dot on each horizontal line (i.e. WL 10", WL 12", WL 14", etc) at the the distance from the centerline as listed on the table.

          Take the 'sheer' dimension listed on the table of heights and the sheer dimension listed on the table of widths for each station and plot that point. That is where the gunwale is.

          Once you get all the ponts plotted, you just "connect the dots" ... of course, you want to use a batten so that you end up with a smooth curve.

          Once you are done with that, you have a line that curves out and toward the bottom from the top of the graph paper. Think the head of a mushroom. When I did my forms, I drew the line past the two sheer dimensions so that there was extra plywood past the point where the gunwale would start. I put a notch in the form at the sheer dimensions so I knew where to stop stripping.

          Keep in mind that if the first half-breadth is listed as WL 10, there is ten inches of plywood below that point of the canoe. That means that your first strip is going to start out about 10" above the strongback for that particular station. Station 0 will start out the highest. The form should look something like a mushrooh head when you are done.

          If you are lofting from Canoecraft, please be aware that there are a couple of dimensions that are incorrect in the book ... see http://www.bearmountainboats.com/canoestems.htm for corresctions.

          There is also a resource you should look through at http://www.bearmountainboats.com/faq_02.htm Make sure you click on the link to handy instructions: http://www.bearmountainboats.com/offset_lofting.htm (note, these are for a kayak but they might be of assistance.

          Good luck!

          Jon

          Ron Niklasson <starryguy59@...> wrote:
          Hi all,
          I'm a woodworker from the mountains of northwest
          Georgia. My kids are grown and gone from the house and
          I want to spend some quality time with my wife. She
          likes to fish and I like the water. I have the
          woodworking tools and have decided to try to build a
          wood strip canoe. I've researched wooden canoes online
          and just purchased the book "Canoecraft". Being cheap,
          I saw plans in the book and thought that 20 dollars
          for the book with 8 different canoe plans was cheaper
          than 35 dollars for one set of plans from a canoe
          company that I found online. After reading some of the
          book, I discovered they talked about "lofting" the
          plans. $35 is starting to sound a little better. On
          the other hand, I get to learn something new and have
          more freedom to learn how to alter plans to make a
          better canoe.
          That said, does anyone have a link to a good
          description on how to loft plans and what all the
          measurements mean?
          Thanks in advance,
          Ron

          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com


          SPONSORED LINKS
          Canoeing and kayaking Paddling gear Wood strip

          ---------------------------------
          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


          Visit your group "cedarstripcanoes" on the web.

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          cedarstripcanoes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          ---------------------------------





          ---------------------------------
          Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ron Niklasson
          Hi everyone, Thanks for the information and links to the lofting sites. Maybe I should have searched a bit first, but then I wouldn t have got to talk with you
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 20, 2006
            Hi everyone,
            Thanks for the information and links to the lofting sites. Maybe I should have searched a bit first, but then I wouldn't have got to talk with you nice folks. I'm planning on building the "prospector" out of the canoecraft book. The links ya'll provided didn't list any corrections to that boat. Are the stem dimensions still reduce by 3/4"? another question, white cedar weighs in at 33 lbs per cubic foot (out of one of my woodworking books), Poplar weighs the same. Are there any disadvantages to using poplar as opposed to the white cedar?
            Thanks again,
            Ron



            ---------------------------------
            Yahoo! Mail
            Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • J. R. Sloan
            Jon, your comments below about lofting are some of the most useful words we ve had on the subject. On several sites lately I ve seen the same question come
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 7, 2006
              Jon, your comments below about "lofting" are some of the most useful
              words we've had on the subject. On several sites lately I've seen
              the same question come up in different words:"What is lofting and
              what are those little arcane phrases all about?"
              We need to be explaining the processes in words that apply to
              today's experiences. For example, describing the shapes of things
              by using profiles on graph paper (X,Y intercepts, like that)makes
              more sense than some other explanations I've read lately.

              And using forms with battens temporarily attached as profiles for
              our own large paper patterns makes more sense these days than
              spiling off with dividers to recreate the odd shapes we sometimes
              need. There's always a way to get things done; as more people try,
              more solutions show up.

              Thanks again for your thoughtful comments.

              JR Sloan




              > Ron,
              >
              > Don't let yourself be intimidated by the lofting process.
              Lofting is nothing more than plotting a curve from X - Y coordinates!
              >
              > Imagine a big piece of graph paper with lines set 2" apart. On
              the table of heights, the Profile 0 line is the centerline. The
              Butt 2 line corresponds the first line located 2" to the right and
              left of the centerline. The Butt 4 line corresponds with the lines
              2" outside of those.
              >
              > The Table of Breadths correspond to the horizontal lines of
              the 'big graph paper.' The WL ## corresponds the the ## of inches
              above the bottom line of the graph. For example, WL10 is the
              horizontal line that is 10" above the bottom of the graph.
              >
              > If you loft onto a piece of paper, you may loft one side only
              and then when you transfer it to your plywood, you do one half at a
              time.
              >
              > When plotting the heights, you simply put a dot on each verticle
              line (i.e. Butt 2", Butt 4", Butt 6", etc) at the height as listed
              on the table. When plotting the half-breadths, you put a dot on
              each horizontal line (i.e. WL 10", WL 12", WL 14", etc) at the the
              distance from the centerline as listed on the table.
              >
              > Take the 'sheer' dimension listed on the table of heights and
              the sheer dimension listed on the table of widths for each station
              and plot that point. That is where the gunwale is.
              >
              > Once you get all the ponts plotted, you just "connect the
              dots" ... of course, you want to use a batten so that you end up
              with a smooth curve.
              >
              > Once you are done with that, you have a line that curves out and
              toward the bottom from the top of the graph paper. Think the head
              of a mushroom. When I did my forms, I drew the line past the two
              sheer dimensions so that there was extra plywood past the point
              where the gunwale would start. I put a notch in the form at the
              sheer dimensions so I knew where to stop stripping.
              >
              > Keep in mind that if the first half-breadth is listed as WL 10,
              there is ten inches of plywood below that point of the canoe. That
              means that your first strip is going to start out about 10" above
              the strongback for that particular station. Station 0 will start
              out the highest. The form should look something like a mushrooh
              head when you are done.
              >
              > If you are lofting from Canoecraft, please be aware that there
              are a couple of dimensions that are incorrect in the book ... see
              http://www.bearmountainboats.com/canoestems.htm for corresctions.
              >
              > There is also a resource you should look through at
              http://www.bearmountainboats.com/faq_02.htm Make sure you click on
              the link to handy instructions:
              http://www.bearmountainboats.com/offset_lofting.htm (note, these are
              for a kayak but they might be of assistance.
              >
              > Good luck!
              >
              > Jon
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.